• Welcome to Tamil Brahmins forums.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our Free Brahmin Community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

To the younger generation on this forum: Do you prefer following the Neo-Vedanta version of Hinduism versus the orthodox version?

renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
After going through the item #18 of Shri Prasad, I was seeing
the serial 'Bhagyalakshmi' in Vijay TV where I observed that in
a birthday party after cake cutting ,one big piece from that is exchanged among members ,each one biting out a bit from it and enjoying it. Even in public places like a restaurant I have seen people sharing food item from the same bowl .The
children also follow similar practice. Soucham is important
and best learned at home .Whatever good practices we want to pass on to our youngsters should be followed by parents at home. Charity begins at home.
I got to agree, its just being clinically safe.

Sharing of saliva isn't hygienic.
If we look at it from a medical point of view, it isn't a safe practice.

Saliva can transmit many disease ranging from dental infections to Covid 19.
 

ekaputra

Member
Even in public places like a restaurant I have seen people sharing food item from the same bowl .
This sight is all too common.

And people, these days, going straight to restaurants after a haircut. If you stay in Chennai, you know that in
most restaurants, in addition to the ceiling fans, they have huge/ powerful pedestal fans going at full blast. Any 'clean up dusting' done in the saloon after a haircut is only superficial. Do they consider the high probability of loose hairs from their bodies and clothes mixing with the food items of other diners?
Sadly, for many people (these days) all traditional beliefs/ practices (including hygienic practices) are irrational and they are ready to 'throw the baby out with the bathwater'.

While, not everything 'old is gold' some traditional practices are good even today and possibly will be good even tomorrow!
 

prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
Yes, you should practice good hygiene. But find out the reason. Doing any practice without reason may not be worth following.
We do some things due to superstition, even if it is silly. As long as it does no harm, I can tolerate it.

Our own Rajiji said that she wears her lucky sari for special occasions, I suppose that is ok.
So I do understand we have an aversion for Echhai, because of hygiene.
But I never understood Patthu.

Sangomji explained it as
The concept of "Pathu" varies, IMO. Highly orthodox people of old used to term any food - with the exception of milk, and water - as Pathu. So, Chapathi was Pathu for them just as Dosa is; but fried items were not classified as Pathu if there was no prior cooking. Therefore, Poori had no Pathu, but Potato Bonda was Pathu.

The concept of "pathu" as explained by PJji was useful in the days before refrigeration. It has lost its meaning in modern days.
Etchi has relevance because of Hygiene consideration.

A younger TB friend here in the USA still follows something akin to "pathu", and it is hilarious.
We were eating dinner in their house sitting at a dining table. It was a typical TB food, some of the items were on the table and other food was on the counter. He had a small petri dish of water by his plate. Every time he will touch that water before reaching for the next item, nobody else was using this practice. I could not suppress my curiosity and I asked for an explanation. He gave me this explanation, that "it is Pathu". I wanted his explanation, he really struggled to give a meaningful explanation. LOL


In Tanzania, the Maasai tribe have an unusual tradition. They get offended if you refuse it. (that is off my list).

Blood is obtained by nicking the jugular artery of a cow precisely, allowing for blood-letting that doesn’t kill the animal. Mixed blood and milk is used as a ritual drink in special celebrations, or given to the sick.

Don't ask for salt when at a host's place in Egypt​

Looks like Egyptians get offended easily. So, if you are invited over for dinner and want to add more salt to your dish, dare not touch the saltshaker because Egyptians feel it is equivalent to insulting the host. Oops!

Throw the baby for good luck in India​

This ritual is mostly followed in Karnataka where newborn babies are thrown off the 50-feet high Sri Santeswar temple. Before you jump to a conclusion; the babies are obviously caught by the family in a cloth. Couples who are blessed with a baby after taking a vow at the temple follow this 500-year-old tradition. It is believed to bring good luck to the babies. Don't know about the babies, but I sure wish we could throw some politicians without catching them.

Eating the dead’s ash in Venezuela and Brazil​

Sure one misses their loved one's when they pass away, but eating their ash to remember them forever? A little far fetched, isn't it? That is exactly what the Yonamamo tribe from Brazil and Venezuela does. Since tradition forbids them from keeping any body part, it is burned and crushed, and the remains are divided amongst the family members and consumed by all.

Bride kidnapping by Romani Gypsies​

In a particularly disturbing custom followed by Roman Gypsies, kidnapping a girl you like is very much legal. If that wasn't weird enough, kidnapping also means that you've won her and have the right to marry her, provided that you are able to keep her as a hostage for 3-5 days. What can I say? I hope the tradition is discontinued now.

Eating the baby's placenta​

In some countries, mothers eat their own placenta after giving birth to take in other nutrients that the placenta is known to have. This tradition is followed in China, Jamaica, and some parts of India.

Why do we continue to blindly follow such customs?​


 
Last edited:

renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
Yes, you should practice good hygiene. But find out the reason. Doing any practice without reason may not be worth following.
We do some things due to superstition, even if it is silly. As long as it does no harm, I can tolerate it.

Our own Rajiji said that she wears her lucky sari for special occasions, I suppose that is ok.
So I do understand we have an aversion for Echhai, because of hygiene.
But I never understood Patthu.

Sangomji explained it as


The concept of "pathu" as explained by PJji was useful in the days before refrigeration. It has lost its meaning in modern days.
Etchi has relevance because of Hygiene consideration.

A younger TB friend here in the USA still follows something akin to "pathu", and it is hilarious.
We were eating dinner in their house sitting at a dining table. It was a typical TB food, some of the items were on the table and other food was on the counter. He had a small petri dish of water by his plate. Every time he will touch that water before reaching for the next item, nobody else was using this practice. I could not suppress my curiosity and I asked for an explanation. He gave me this explanation, that "it is Pathu". I wanted his explanation, he really struggled to give a meaningful explanation. LOL


In Tanzania, the Maasai tribe have an unusual tradition. They get offended if you refuse it. (that is off my list).



Don't ask for salt when at a host's place in Egypt​

Looks like Egyptians get offended easily. So, if you are invited over for dinner and want to add more salt to your dish, dare not touch the saltshaker because Egyptians feel it is equivalent to insulting the host. Oops!

Throw the baby for good luck in India​

This ritual is mostly followed in Karnataka where newborn babies are thrown off the 50-feet high Sri Santeswar temple. Before you jump to a conclusion; the babies are obviously caught by the family in a cloth. Couples who are blessed with a baby after taking a vow at the temple follow this 500-year-old tradition. It is believed to bring good luck to the babies. Don't know about the babies, but I sure wish we could throw some politicians without catching them.

Eating the dead’s ash in Venezuela and Brazil​

Sure one misses their loved one's when they pass away, but eating their ash to remember them forever? A little far fetched, isn't it? That is exactly what the Yonamamo tribe from Brazil and Venezuela does. Since tradition forbids them from keeping any body part, it is burned and crushed, and the remains are divided amongst the family members and consumed by all.

Bride kidnapping by Romani Gypsies​

In a particularly disturbing custom followed by Roman Gypsies, kidnapping a girl you like is very much legal. If that wasn't weird enough, kidnapping also means that you've won her and have the right to marry her, provided that you are able to keep her as a hostage for 3-5 days. What can I say? I hope the tradition is discontinued now.

Eating the baby's placenta​

In some countries, mothers eat their own placenta after giving birth to take in other nutrients that the placenta is known to have. This tradition is followed in China, Jamaica, and some parts of India.

Why do we continue to blindly follow such customs?​


I guess those days people used hands to take items instead of spoon so rapidly deteriorating items were treated differently from non rapid deteriorating items.

But whatever said and done, nothing should become a OCD.
 

usaiyer

Active member
'Pathhu' and 'Vizhuppu" have become OCD s with some
people. Luckily we don't have those weird customs obtaining
elsewhere as detailed above. Hindu culture being very ancient
has very much evolved over the years and have lot of hygienic
points for others to follow,
I was standing in the dais when Rajaji was making a public speech in Delhi long time ago and even after a long speech ,he did not even
sip some water kept for speakers. I learnt later that as a practice, some persons don't eat or drink anything outside .
Some people even avoid open dining, and dine privately.
May be ,this custom gradually changing.
 

renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
Customs pertaining to hygiene is fine but at the same time one should not identify too much with the body as if its so unstable that it would be become defiled.

Just take a throat swab and watch how much bacteria there is in a normal human itself..none of us are bacteria free.
In fact live wont be possible if we are totally 100% bacteria free.

In fact one of the reasons why the slum areas of India had less Covid 19 death is because they were having a stronger immune system being exposed to all sorts of pathogens since birth.

Try being tooooo clean..that would totally make our immune system go into an overdrive which can lead to fatal allergic reactions.

Life is about striking a balance.

One who is too clean is no different from one who is too dirty..both have disorders.


Coming to being so afraid to be "spiritualy" defiled..we have to realize that the body is just a garment..if it gets dirty, wash it! thats all.
The atma doesnt get defiled no matter even if we fall into a sewer.
if we feel we can get defiled so easily that shows we never understood hindu philosophy.
 

usaiyer

Active member
'Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must
keep moving. 'was Albert Einstein's life advice in a letter to his
son Eduard on 5thFeb.1930
My most joyous moment as a youngster was when I learnt
that I can ride the bicycle by myself with out any body 's support ,which was so far given to me.
But it takes a while and plenty of enthusiasm and efforts
to get the balance out there ,including life.
 

shankarkrupa

New member
If you consider people <45-50 as youngsters, then I am.. . Otherwise not. 🙂

I do value the anushtaanam and acharam, be it rituals, formalities, or habits. The value for some are clear and some are not. If we have done our due diligence in speaking with elders and learned and not found a satisfactory answer, it might be fine to not follow it. However, I feel a lot of people give it up because there is no one to say the answer convincingly.

I think the neo-Vedanta is nothing new but appears as new because most people do not know what is already there. As such, I think we can follow whatever path we want so long as we do not neglect the basics, the achara and anushtaana vidhigal.
 

tbs

Well-known member
hi doctor,

n fact one of the reasons why the slum areas of India had less Covid 19 death is because they were having a stronger immune system being exposed to all sorts of pathogens since birth.

Try being tooooo clean..that would totally make our immune system go into an overdrive which can lead to fatal allergic reactions.

Life is about striking a balance.

One who is too clean is no different from one who is too dirty..both have disorders.

i agreed.....more clean western countries have more covid 19 deaths....i think ...you got more

spare time in covid 19 period....may be working from home....
 
OP
P

prveeraraghavan

New member
If you consider people <45-50 as youngsters, then I am.. . Otherwise not. 🙂

I do value the anushtaanam and acharam, be it rituals, formalities, or habits. The value for some are clear and some are not. If we have done our due diligence in speaking with elders and learned and not found a satisfactory answer, it might be fine to not follow it. However, I feel a lot of people give it up because there is no one to say the answer convincingly.

I think the neo-Vedanta is nothing new but appears as new because most people do not know what is already there. As such, I think we can follow whatever path we want so long as we do not neglect the basics, the achara and anushtaana vidhigal.
What are the achara and anushtana vidhigal, as you define it?
 

sankarm

Member
I KNOW MANY OF MY RELATIVE GUYS WHO ARE INTO IT SECTOR AND MOVED TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND HAVE FORGOTTEN OUR CULTURE DUE TO EITHER THE LIFE STYLE THERE OR BECAUSE OF SHYNESS AS KEEPING VIBUTHI ON FOREHEAD AND GOING TO OFFICE IS FELT STRANGE BY SOME OF THEM. HOW TO CORRECT THEM IS REALLY A QUESTION MARK
I moved to USA in 1972. I was shy about wearing Vibuthi in public. I used to wear at home and till I went to college and then lightly erase it. After a few years nd learning about lent and ash Wednesday from my catholic friends, I started wearing Vibuthi in public. If anybody asked, my explanation was it is sacred ash, sign of my God and I wear it after shower everyday and for my prayers. Occasionally I would drop something about lent and ash Wednesday.
Incidentally I used the same temporarily giving up meat or some other desired food lent analogy to explain permanently giving up pineapple in Kashi
 

prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
I am in my 30s. I must be an anomaly here.

I was just wondering if any of you identify stronger with Neo-Vedanta over the Mathas.
What is the point of repeating your question? We had all these discussions on this topic. Did you read them and did you understand them?

If you did not get your answer the first time. why do you think you are going to get a different result this time around?
 
OP
P

prveeraraghavan

New member
What is the point of repeating your question? We had all these discussions on this topic. Did you read them and did you understand them?

If you did not get your answer the first time. why do you think you are going to get a different result this time around?

I was simply answering another person's question about "youngster" and re-iterated why I made this post. I have read through the responses.

Also, why the hostility? I think you and I actually may have a very similar mental wavelength in the context of this forum, so there is no need to create any bad blood.
 

prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
I was simply answering another person's question about "youngster" and re-iterated why I made this post. I have read through the responses.

Also, why the hostility? I think you and I actually may have a very similar mental wavelength in the context of this forum, so there is no need to create any bad blood.
There is no hostility, it is an inquiry.
I posted my answers honestly.

The story is a conversation between Nachiketa (a teenage boy) and Yama (Lord of death) from ''KATHOPANISHAD'' (5th Century BC).

Natciketa asked Yama a tough question, and Yama answered it calmly. He did not interpret it as hostility.
 

kaushiksv

Member
Myself NRI and will be 30 soon. Neo-vedanta and orthodoxy are not mutually exclusive. Everyone knows about neovedanta, so I'm gonna defend orthodoxy.

My father died before I turned 20. I was desperate for sense of belonging. Orthodoxy helps here. Most people in 20s haven't had such experiences and seem to abhor rituals. Nityakarma like Sandhyavandhana is a package that consists of meditation, basic vedic chants, shlokas, and abivadaye, which all can only benefit the individual. Over period of time, these rituals also foster interest in surrounding areas like Vedaparayanam. All these will help an individual connect with the past in a good way and draw him to the Dharmic path. Dr. Phillip Zimbardo has been saying, it is important to be past-positive. Therefore it is important for majority people to keep alive rituals like Sandhyavandanam (Nityakarma). Also, misinterpretation of ancient traditions can happen only when they are not kept alive. So, it is important to keep alive traditions, at least the good things (which is majority). More important is for people to understand the benefits, let it sink in deeply, and also tell others. I don't intend to proselytize, however I will propgate.

Someone mentioned that "vizhupu", and "pathu" becoming OCD. Again, these habits are good as long as we don't let them consume us. It is like checking the blind spot before switching lane. We tend to do it subconsciously even when the expressway is empty. If someone is blocking my view, sure it will annoy me, but I am going to stay in lane for few more seconds and then switch. It makes no sense to loose the habit though.

br,
Kaushik
 

Rudra_Maha

New member
@prveeraraghavan Hi Sir, I'm in my late 20s. For me, I identify more with the concept of Dharma shastras and rituals. Many reasons are:-

1. Upbringing. My grandfather and ancestors were priests. They've passed down some rituals, these have become a part of the family line.

2. Gives a structure to my life. At some point, some rituals like sandhyavandanam and agnihotram have made me more disciplined and structured in approach. Like it or not, whenever I feel depressed or lazy, just this single to do item in my list has made me get off the couch and perform.

3. Mantras. I'm more into learning the mantras and sort of enjoy the astika traditions. I am not a person who would advocate for renunciation of worldly pleasures to attain the super consciousness. Dharma-->Artha-->Kama--> Moksha is the route I prefer.

4. Identity. This is one important factor. It gives a purpose. When I commit to a ritual, say Samidadhanam, I try to do all the necessary activities, like cleaning the house, setting things up. By the time homam is done, almost everyone is awake at home because of me and the smoke. Just because of me being like this, many in the family have stopped being lazy and super active. They can't be sleeping beyond 7 in the morning. Thus, a ritual, gave an identity and purpose. This has benefited largely when I walk into a group of people who would generally be hostile to me, say a group of communists or others. The structure certain rituals provide to life are super strong that, others(people who've ridiculed me for being a brahmin) have themselves appreciated me for sticking to my guns without giving into their qualms.

These are some of the reasons why I'm largely a patron of the rituals. I could change in the future, but for now, I find this much more easier and definite.
 

usaiyer

Active member
Rituals are good. i like this approach and appreciate you also are able to know its benefits in molding your character.
But other activities like visiting temples, daily puja and some
helpful social activities around your neighbor hood depending on what they need can help take you farther in terms of self satisfaction and goal fulfillment.
My best wishes to this youngster.
 
Top
  Thank you for visiting TamilBrahmins.com

You seem to have an Ad Blocker on.

We depend on advertising to keep our content free for you. Please consider whitelisting us in your ad blocker so that we can continue to provide the content you have come here to enjoy.

Alternatively, consider upgrading your account to enjoy an ad-free experience along with numerous other benefits. To upgrade your account, please visit the account upgrades page

You can also donate financially if you can. Please Click Here on how you can do that.