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Saris disappearing from the big screen?

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prasad1

Well-known member
rekha.nodedisplay.jpg


A sari-clad woman walking down New York's swish Fifth Avenue would cause any number of heads to turn but sadly, Bollywood, through whose eyes much of the world sees India, has virtually discarded the six-yard wonder.

This despite the fact that Bollywood siren Sridevi wooed Anil Kapoor in "Mr India" in a sari, that Kajol made everyone fall in love with her in "Kuch Kuch Hota Hai" and the ever-gorgeous Rekha still swears by it.
These days, on the big screen, most Bollywood actresses are seen in western attire or in fusion wear - but hardly ever in a sari, unless the role involves an older woman.
One reason for this is that art imitates life and vice versa. With today's young people largely opting for Western wear, it was only natural that this would be reflected on the big screen, experts say.
"Today's generation is more inspired by fusion and Western wear," designer Leena Singh of the Ashima-Leena duo said.
She, however, was confident that the sari would one day regain the pre-eminent status it enjoyed in Bollywood till the late 1990s.

Saris disappearing from the big screen? | Bollywood.com : Entertainment news, movie, music and fashion reviews
 

Raji Ram

Well-known member
Neither the saree nor the blouse is worn in the traditional style, as shown in the above photo!

They are designed only to expose the body. Jeans and shirts are far more better.
 

nannilam_balasubramanian

Well-known member
Saris disappearing from the big screen

I am not talking about the big screen. No doubt Sari is a traditional
dress. We can proudly say that Sari, Dhoti are parts of our Vedic
culture. In the yester years, women will normally be found only in
Sari, because that was the custom. Salwar Kameez system slowly
dripped into Hindu women too. But one thing it is safer to women and
the present day girls. Dress with pants, long sleeved top and a shawl
over that has its own advantage. The shawl can be draped around the
shoulders and across the chest, normally does not attract unwanted
people eyes and saves one from some stares. Olden days, people
wearing the sari, used to cover the shoulder including the waist across
the chest, but now a days, people wear sari, uncover the waist completely
with a blouse just above the belly.

Balasubramanian
Ambattur
 

BostonSankara

New member
When I go to temple for functions I am one of very few men wearing dhoti and angavastram that aren't priests. It's sad really because #1) it's incredibly comfortable, #2) It is highly satvik to wear a dhoti, and #3) it is what is APPROPRIATE for men to wear at the temple. But hey ... I'm just a white guy caught up in the mix what do I know :)
 

KRS

Well-known member
Dear Sri BostonSankara Ji,

I readily agree with your points #s 1 & 3 above. Can you tell me where the 'highly sattvic' reference comes from?

Regards,
KRS
 

BostonSankara

New member
I have heard over the years that saris and dhotis are considered a satvik form of clothing with people making note of the fact that they are woven and are not stitched. I have no classical reference to quote other than the fact that I have heard it via word of mouth on more than one occasion.
 

KRS

Well-known member
Okay, thanks. Makes sense.

Regards,
KRS

I have heard over the years that saris and dhotis are considered a satvik form of clothing with people making note of the fact that they are woven and are not stitched. I have no classical reference to quote other than the fact that I have heard it via word of mouth on more than one occasion.
 

renuka

Well-known member
I love sarees..its one garment that can bring out the best in a woman esp the cute barely there blouses..we can be traditional and sexy and the same time.

The Saree is not disappearing but its blouses are disappearing!!

But you know what..you actually have to pay more for stitching any barely there blouses..tailor claims he needs to do more work..makes me wonder that we pay more for less???
 

Haridasa Siva

New member
In big screen, it does not matter what clothes the woman wears. She knows to reveal in any attire. I am not complaining!

In real life, women moved from saree to salwar. They first wore the dupatta in a V shape, it then moved to q shape and now there is no dupatta at all! Kali kaalam....
 

renuka

Well-known member
In big screen, it does not matter what clothes the woman wears. She knows to reveal in any attire. I am not complaining!

In real life, women moved from saree to salwar. They first wore the dupatta in a V shape, it then moved to q shape and now there is no dupatta at all! Kali kaalam....

nope..not many woman are fond of salwar kameez..I dont like it as much.
firstly it's too expensive and sarees cost much less.

Salwar Kameez somehow looks better on a Punjabi as compared to any other Indian but saree looks good on anyone..so I prefer saree.
 

Raghy

Well-known member
Greetings.

Once I said to my wife I like her better in sarees. She said I am old fashioned.... I said, 'no, it is easier to remove a saree......:heh:

Cheers!
 

Raji Ram

Well-known member
I............But you know what..you actually have to pay more for stitching any barely there blouses..tailor claims he needs to do more work..makes me wonder that we pay more for less???[/QUOTE}

Dear Renu, I am reminded of a joke.

My uncle who had a bald head used to complain that the barber charges full fee for his hair cut.

My husband told him once that he should be happy that the charge is NOT doubled, because the barber
has to search for the hair and then cut it..
:spy:
 

nannilam_balasubramanian

Well-known member
When I go to temple for functions I am one of very few men wearing dhoti and angavastram that aren't priests. It's sad really because #1) it's incredibly comfortable, #2) It is highly satvik to wear a dhoti, and #3) it is what is APPROPRIATE for men to wear at the temple. But hey ... I'm just a white guy caught up in the mix what do I know :)

You should be really proud to have your tradition with you as a Compliment and
admiration goes with it.

Balasubramanian
Ambattur
 

renuka

Well-known member
Greetings.

Once I said to my wife I like her better in sarees. She said I am old fashioned.... I said, 'no, it is easier to remove a saree......:heh:

Cheers!

Same goes with Vesthi..its the garment of mass reproduction!!
 

amala

Well-known member
Well PrasadJi I dunno about the movies and all but I sure do my bit as far as wearing saris go. But i have to admit that the Salwar Kameez is a much more easier and practical garment to wear especially if one is using public transport. Especially for those of us who have grown up in trousers and jeans!
 

amala

Well-known member
When I go to temple for functions I am one of very few men wearing dhoti and angavastram that aren't priests. It's sad really because #1) it's incredibly comfortable, #2) It is highly satvik to wear a dhoti, and #3) it is what is APPROPRIATE for men to wear at the temple. But hey ... I'm just a white guy caught up in the mix what do I know :)

How heartwarming to read that. I do feel a tad shameful for not wearing ethnic clothing as often as I'd like to for various reasons that i can't be bothered to articulate here. But us ethnic Indians, American desis et al can learn A LOT from you including the self deprecating modesty :)
 
OP
OP
prasad1

prasad1

Well-known member
I am nostalgic, and probably old fashioned. For a dressy occasion in Indian setting "sari" is still the preferred dress. I understand the western cloths and Salwar kamiz being more comfortable.
In India particularly in metro cities you can hardly find young people wearing Indian cloths. I am told that many of them do not know how to drape a sari.
A young Indian girl has written an APP for apple Iphone and tells you how to wear sari.
There is nothing wrong or right, it is just that fashion is changing.
 

guruvayurappan

Well-known member
Neither the saree nor the blouse is worn in the traditional style, as shown in the above photo!

They are designed only to expose the body. Jeans and shirts are far more better.
what ever the dress whether western,indian,punjabi,sindhi etc. it will not look obscene if it is worn in its traditional manner. we are not feeling to comment the people who are dressing in a decent manner. Even in sari ,see in many marriage albums, the women look vamps
guruvayurappan
 

Visalakshi Ramani

Well-known member
My guess for the attribute satvic...

Those days dhothis and saris were mainly made of cotton which is just a plant.

The wool, the silk and the leather are all obtained from animal sources and involve a certain amount of cruelty.

They are considered as non-satvic.

Dear Sri BostonSankara Ji,

I readily agree with your points #s 1 & 3 above. Can you tell me where the 'highly sattvic' reference comes from?

Regards,
KRS
 

Visalakshi Ramani

Well-known member
When the Big Bachchan visited Kerala recently, he dressed up in the local dhothi. :thumb:

He was immensely pleased at the convenience of the dress which he called as air-conditioned dress
(since it allowed free circulation of fresh air) :)

I feel suffocated to find the present day pregnant women wearing chudidhar - blocking fresh air and looking voluminous in addition.
:preggers:
 

Visalakshi Ramani

Well-known member
When my elder son became a citizen of USA, we all accompanied him to the swearing in ceremony.

My D. I. law's American friend also came with us. She also wore a sari like I did. So my D. I. L also changed to a sari.

We were the most colourful group in the entire gathering.

The American girl with her golden brown fringe and pony tail dressed in is a copper sulphate sari, my ivory coloured D.I.L in a bight orange sari and I in a brown and green sari.

We loved all the attention we got and the wave the governor gave us when my son spoke extempore in the gathering. :)


I am nostalgic, and probably old fashioned. For a dressy occasion in Indian setting "sari" is still the preferred dress. I understand the western cloths and Salwar kamiz being more comfortable.
In India particularly in metro cities you can hardly find young people wearing Indian cloths. I am told that many of them do not know how to drape a sari.
A young Indian girl has written an APP for apple Iphone and tells you how to wear sari.
There is nothing wrong or right, it is just that fashion is changing.
 

BostonSankara

New member
Thank you all for your kind words! Now... if only I could get the Dhoti tied right the first time instead of it taking me forever I'd be all set!
 
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