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Chinese home first aid for stroke

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Brahmanyan

Active member
I got the following information forwarded to me recently. I cannot vouch for its authenticity. Since it is a medical information, I request some of our members who are Doctors by profession to go through the information and advise whether this method is used as an approved First aid .

Brahmanyan,
Bangalore.






From a Chinese Professor .

Keep a syringe or needle in your home to do this... It's amazing and an unconventional way of recovering from stroke, read it through it can help somebody one day.

This is amazing.
Please keep this very handy. Excellent tips.
Do take a minute to read this.
You'll never know, ones life may depend on you.

My father was paralysed and later died from the result of a stroke. I wish I knew about this first aid before.
When stroke strikes, the capillaries in the brain will gradually burst. (Irene Liu)
When a stroke occurs, stay calm.

No matter where the victim is, do not move him/her. Because, if moved, the capillaries will burst.

Help the victim to sit up where he/she is to prevent him/her from falling over again and then the blood letting can begin .

If you have in your home an injection syringe that would be the best.

Otherwise, a sewing needle or a straight pin will do.

1. Place the needle/pin over fire to sterilize it and then use it to prick the tip of all ......10 fingers.
2. There are no specific acupuncture points, just prick about an mm from the fingernail.
3. Prick till blood comes out.
4. If blood does not start to drip, then squeeze with your fingers.
5. When all 10 digits is bleeding, wait a few minutes then the victim will regain consciousness.

6. If the victim's mouth is crooked , then pull on his ears until they are red.
7. Then prick each earlobe twice until two drops of blood comes from each earlobe.
After a few minutes the victim should regain consciousness.

Wait till the victim regains his normal state without any abnormal symptoms then take him to the hospital.
Otherwise, if he was taken in the ambulance in a hurry to the hospital, the bumpy trip will cause all the capillaries in his brain to burst.

If he could save his life, barely managing to walk, then it is by the grace of his ancestors.
'I learned about letting blood to save life from Chinese traditional doctor, Ha Bu Ting, who lives in Sun Juke.

Furthermore, I had practical experience with it. Therefore, I can say this method is 100% effective.
In 1979, I was teaching in Fung Gaap College in Tai Chung.

One afternoon, I was teaching a class when another teacher came running to my classroom and said in panting,
'Ms Liu, come quick, our supervisor has had a stroke !'. I immediately went to the 3rd floor.
When I saw our supervisor, Mr. Chen Fu Tien, his colour was off, his speech was slurred , his mouth was crooked - all the symptoms of a stroke.

I immediately asked one of the practicum students to go to the pharmacy outside the school to buy a syringe, which I used to prick Mr. Chen's 10 fingers tips.

When all 10 fingers were bleeding (each with a pea-sized drop of blood), after a few minutes, Mr. Chen's face regained its colour and his eyes' spirit returned,

But his mouth was still crooked . So I pulled on his ears to fill them with blood.
When his ears became red ,
I pricked his right earlobe twice to let out two drops of blood .
When both earlobes had two drops of blood each , a miracle happened .
Within 3-5 minutes the shape of his mouth returned to normal and his speech became clear.

We let him rest for a while and have a cup of hot tea , then we helped him go down the stairs, drove him to Wei Wah Hospital . He rested one night and was released the next day to return to school to teach.. Everything worked normally.
There were no ill after effects.
On the other hand, the usual stroke victim usually suffers Irreparable bursting of the brain capillaries on the way to the hospital.
As a result, these victims never recover.' (Irene Liu)
Therefore, stroke is the second cause of death.
The lucky ones will stay alive but can remain paralysed for life.

It is such a horrible thing to happen in ones life.

If we can all remember this blood letting method and start the life saving process immediately, in a short time, the victim will be revived and regain 100% normality.

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE FORWARD THIS AFTER READING . YOU NEVER KNOW IT MAY HELP SAVE A LIFE FROM STROKE


 

renuka

Well-known member
No..I would not recommend this.

Strokes are of 3 kinds:


1) Ischemic Strokes ..caused by obstruction of blood supply within a vessel that supplies blood to the brain.
87% of strokes are of this variety

2)Hemorrhagic Stroke ..which causes bleeding as a result of rupture of a malformed blood vessel or an aneurysm.

3)Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) which is a mini stroke..caused by a temporary obstruction either due to a blood clot or any infected emboli.

The very fact that the writer of this method was not aware of the different types of strokes and took it for granted that strokes are only caused by bleeding blood vessels....already casts a doubt on its authenticity.

Further more why make patient bleed and introduce infections in that process.
 
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prasad1

Active member
No..I would not recommend this.

Strokes are of 3 kinds:


1) Ischemic Strokes ..caused by obstruction of blood supply within a vessel that supplies blood to the brain.
87% of strokes are of this variety

2)Hemorrhagic Stroke ..which causes bleeding as a result of rupture of a malformed blood vessel or an aneurysm.

3)Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) which is a mini stroke..caused by a temporary obstruction either due to a blood clot or any infected emboli.

The very fact that the writer of this method was not aware of the different types of strokes and took it for granted that strokes are only caused by bleeding blood vessels....already casts a doubt on its authenticity.

Further more why make patient bleed and introduce infections in that process.

Unproven and half baked ideas of helping can cause more damage than help.
In underdeveloped countries Emergency medical care is in its infancy. In the western countries it is very advanced, and can reach a patient in time.
 
I won't discount the method recommended. Strokes are caused by (a) a clot in one of the arteries leading to the brain, (b) a spasm in a blood vessel in the brain (called TIA), and (c) a hemorrhagic phenomenon. Let us take each one at a time.

(a) if a clot forms, it obstructs the flow of blood supply to the brain cells. It needs to be treated with a clot buster drug in a hospital setting.
(b). TIA caused by a spasm in a blood vessel can be temporary and will restore to a normal state pretty soon. In any case when visiting a hospital that can be taken care of.
(c) hemorrhagic stroke needs a hospital treatment.

Having said all that, the pinprick method suggested can work so long as one uses sterile syringe or needle and sanguination (blood letting) is done to the extent suggested it cannot harm and to a large extent restore normalcy. The vascular system is a closed loop and when there is a path of least resistance such as a cut in a blood vessel, the flow might resume thereby relieving the symptoms. This is a mechanistic process. Remember we are not bleeding the patient to death. A pea-sized drop from 10 fingers is not the end of the world. The earlobe pricking may be more effective since it is closer to the brain in the vascular system. As a first-aid it can be done without serious consequences. By doing this you will delay complications before you take the patient to the hospital. You are buying time by doing this while waiting for the ambulance. The least you could do is this.

Chinese medicine, once discounted, is gaining popularity in the US medical system. Lots of doctors swear by the effectiveness of acupuncture (for stroke we are not talking acupuncture but just pinpricks at fingertips) for all kinds of maladies. Several doctors from the US go to China to get certified training.

Now you could take some preventive measures to avoid a stroke in the first place. First take a daily dose of aspirin (100 mg per day) to thin the blood. Second take a Magnesium tablet (400 mg Magnesium) in a chelated form (this will prevent what are known as platelets in the blood stream from agglomerating and be a precursor for clot formation). Thirdly drink lots of water everyday especially before going to bed (most strokes occur in early morning) since dehydration is a major cause of stroke (a protein in the blood called fibrinogen gets concentrated when you get dehydrated and an enzyme called thrombin goes to work to break the fibrinogen into another protein called fibrin which forms a stitch around the aggregated platelets and form a clot). Follow this simple regimen every day and you will not regret it.

There is disagreement even among doctors (cardilogists) as to how to handle the situation. Most of the time they like to "treat" the disease after you become a victim. Myself and a colleague have done research in this area and a book was written by my colleague Dr. James Crawford. The book is titled, "A stroke was my teacher". Go to Amazon.com and you can order the book there. It is a small investment that could save your life.
 
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By using sterile needle you are not going to infect the patient. As for bleeding at the fingertips it sill stop by itself soon since the clotting process will work to prevent excessive bleeding.
 

prasad1

Active member
By using sterile needle you are not going to infect the patient. As for bleeding at the fingertips it sill stop by itself soon since the clotting process will work to prevent excessive bleeding.

I am amazed at your suggestion. I thought you were a scientist in NIH. I am so happy that you are not one anymore. I would have lost faith in that august body.

In India if a person had convulsion, they would put a key or chappal in front of the persons nose, instead of rushing him to Hospital.
Convulsion, condition characterized by violent, uncontrolled spasmodic contractions and relaxations of the voluntary muscles. Convulsions may be a symptom resulting from various conditions and diseases, such as epilepsy, uremia, eclampsia, rabies, tetanus, strychnine poisoning, and cerebral tumor.
They are usually accompanied by loss of consciousness. During a convulsion the individual’s clothing should be loosened around the neck, the head should be cushioned with a pillow, and any sharp or hard objects should be removed from the area. An object should never be inserted into the person’s mouth during a convulsion. Medical treatment should be sought immediately after the convulsion ceases.

You assumed a sterile needle? You assumed the bleeding will stop? Two mistake in one sentence.
What if the patient was on heparin, or aspirin he may bleed to death. Please try this method in USA, i would not come to see you in the jail.
 
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prasad1

Active member
According to About.com's stroke expert, Dr. Jose Vega, this message was clearly authored by someone with no real medical knowledge and shouldn't be taken seriously. Following the instructions above, in fact, might do more harm than good.


"The email conveys multiple unfounded ideas about stroke," Vega writes, "but by far the most dangerous one of all is the suggestion that people should not be taken to a hospital until all their symptoms are resolved, on the grounds that 'all the capillaries in the brain will burst on the way to the hospital.' This statement is untrue and totally irresponsible."

The first thing you should do if you or someone you know exhibits symptoms of a stroke is call an ambulance. The most effective stroke treatment known, a blood thinner called tPA, must be administered within three hours of the onset of symptoms, so every minute counts. Delaying hospitalization for any reason may worsen the patient's prognosis.

Prior to the 19th century, bloodletting was a standard "cure" for practically everything, including stroke ("apoplexy"). In western medicine the practice was based on the ancient Theory of Humours, which held that all disease results from an imbalance of four bodily fluids: blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile. Siphoning off a certain amount of blood -- often copious amounts of it, actually -- was believed to restore the balance necessary for recovery from illness and long-term good health.
Like most medical advice dispensed in the form of a chain e-mail message, it has no scientific basis. In fact, following its advice can do harm.
Forcing a stroke victim to sit up is never a good idea, because it can cause a drop in blood pressure, says Dr. Larry Goldstein, director of the Duke Stroke Center.
It would be better to help the person lie down.
Pricking the victim's finger also is a bad idea, not only because it is futile, but because doing so can delay medical treatment, which is the only thing that can help.
THE BOTTOM LINE
Only emergency medical treatment can help a stroke victim.




Read more: Reality Check: Can pricking a stroke victim's fingers can help delay symptoms? - seattlepi.com
 

prasad1

Active member
What should be done if you suspect you or someone else is having a stroke?


If any of the symptoms mentioned above suddenly appear, immediate emergency medical attention should be sought. The first action should be to activate the emergency medical system in your area (call 911 if it is available). The goal is to get the stroke victim to a hospital as quickly as possible to confirm the diagnosis. An urgent medical decision is necessary in the emergency room to determine whether thrombolytic or clot busting drugs can potentially reverse the stroke situation. There is a very limited window of opportunity from the onset of symptoms to when this therapy can be used. If delays occur, the opportunity to intervene is lost.


The first priority is ensuring that the ambulance arrives as soon as possible since first responders, EMTs and paramedics may be able to help make the diagnosis and alert the hospital about the stoke victim's situation.


While waiting for the ambulance, the following first aid suggestions may be helpful:


The affected person should lie flat to promote an optimal blood flow to the brain.
If drowsiness, unresponsiveness, or nausea are present, the person should be placed in the rescue position on their side to prevent choking should vomiting occur.
Although aspirin plays a major role in stroke prevention (see below), once the symptoms of a stroke begin, it is generally recommended that additional aspirin not be taken until the patient receives medical attention. If stroke is of the bleeding type, aspirin could theoretically make matters worse. Moreover, patients with stroke may have swallowing difficulties and may choke on the pill.
Three commands, known as the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS), may help to determine if the potential for stroke exists. Ask the patient to do the following:


Smile: the face should move symmetrically
Raise both arms: looking for weakness on one side of the body
Speak a simple sentence
If a potential stroke victim cannot perform these tasks, 911 should be called to activated the emergency medical system.
Stroke Symptoms, Causes, Treatment - What should be done if you suspect you or someone else is having a stroke? on MedicineNet
 
According to About.com's stroke expert, Dr. Jose Vega, this message was clearly authored by someone with no real medical knowledge and shouldn't be taken seriously. Following the instructions above, in fact, might do more harm than good.


"The email conveys multiple unfounded ideas about stroke," Vega writes, "but by far the most dangerous one of all is the suggestion that people should not be taken to a hospital until all their symptoms are resolved, on the grounds that 'all the capillaries in the brain will burst on the way to the hospital.' This statement is untrue and totally irresponsible."

The first thing you should do if you or someone you know exhibits symptoms of a stroke is call an ambulance. The most effective stroke treatment known, a blood thinner called tPA, must be administered within three hours of the onset of symptoms, so every minute counts. Delaying hospitalization for any reason may worsen the patient's prognosis.

Prior to the 19th century, bloodletting was a standard "cure" for practically everything, including stroke ("apoplexy"). In western medicine the practice was based on the ancient Theory of Humours, which held that all disease results from an imbalance of four bodily fluids: blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile. Siphoning off a certain amount of blood -- often copious amounts of it, actually -- was believed to restore the balance necessary for recovery from illness and long-term good health.
Like most medical advice dispensed in the form of a chain e-mail message, it has no scientific basis. In fact, following its advice can do harm.
Forcing a stroke victim to sit up is never a good idea, because it can cause a drop in blood pressure, says Dr. Larry Goldstein, director of the Duke Stroke Center.
It would be better to help the person lie down.
Pricking the victim's finger also is a bad idea, not only because it is futile, but because doing so can delay medical treatment, which is the only thing that can help.
THE BOTTOM LINE
Only emergency medical treatment can help a stroke victim.




Read more: Reality Check: Can pricking a stroke victim's fingers can help delay symptoms? - seattlepi.com

Let me stop you in your tracks just there. Even the chinese treatment says it is just a first-aid and nobody is recommending to stop there. While you call the ambulance and wait for it do this first-aid so that it does not get complicated. The stroke-caused damage can be enormous with passage of time. Even in the US metro area an ambulance can take a minimum of half an hour.

You are reading some dot com site and prescribe something about which even cardiologists are contending with each other. You know most doctors are so ignorant about the causal factors of stroke. They think atrial fibrillation is the main cause for stroke. They contend that atrial fibrillation (Afib) makes the blood pool in the lower chamber of the heart and causes clotting of blood which can travel towards the brain. But in 85% of stroke occurrences , there is no Afib. It is a general condition in the vascular system. I explained in my previous message about it. Pl read that. Also instead of reading about com and old wives sites, buy and read the book I suggested. The epidemiology and causal factors of stroke are explained there.

Even if you are a medical doctor I will not pay attention to what you are stating. Apparently you do not know the basics behind ischemic attacks, stroke, and bleeding. First, if it is a clot-caused stroke there is no reason to believe that the person will bleed profusely with a pinprick. As the blood thickens due to dehydration, the situation is favorable for clot formation. If you are on coumadin, yes there is that risk. If aspirin is taken in limited quantities I suggested (100 mg per day)there is no risk of bleeding either. Besides almost nobody is using aspirin these days as pain-killers. If the person is on heparin there would not have been a clot in the first place. Heparin is usually administered under hospital settings, not taken by the patient at home as a tablet. As for spasmodic cause, many times it is temporary and resolves itself before emergency personnel arrive. But a minor intervention as suggested is not going to cause problems.

I repeat nobody is suggesting to stay put without calling 911.
 
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I am amazed at your suggestion. I thought you were a scientist in NIH. I am so happy that you are not one anymore. I would have lost faith in that august body.

In India if a person had convulsion, they would put a key or chappal in front of the persons nose, instead of rushing him to Hospital.
Convulsion, condition characterized by violent, uncontrolled spasmodic contractions and relaxations of the voluntary muscles. Convulsions may be a symptom resulting from various conditions and diseases, such as epilepsy, uremia, eclampsia, rabies, tetanus, strychnine poisoning, and cerebral tumor.
They are usually accompanied by loss of consciousness. During a convulsion the individual’s clothing should be loosened around the neck, the head should be cushioned with a pillow, and any sharp or hard objects should be removed from the area. An object should never be inserted into the person’s mouth during a convulsion. Medical treatment should be sought immediately after the convulsion ceases.

You assumed a sterile needle? You assumed the bleeding will stop? Two mistake in one sentence.
What if the patient was on heparin, or aspirin he may bleed to death. Please try this method in USA, i would not come to see you in the jail.

I am amazed that you do not know that NIH has a separate division now to try alternative medicine treatments. I am sure you would place faith on those doctors who take time to pray or recite some mantras before even looking at the patient or at a crucial time when medical attention to details is required.

There is no need to bring in convulsion here. Convulsion is a separate topic unrelated to stroke. Even there giving a key or some other metallic objects is not going to cause any harm but it functions like a lightning conductor, passing the electrical impulses in the body to the ground. Let us not discuss it here when the topic is stroke.

FYI: If you get a sterile syringe (which is packaged properly---e.g., BD insulin syringes) IT IS STERILE. Even if you take some other needle as the Chinese treatment indicates, she says heat it in a flame so that it will become sterile. You are making an unproven prognosis(that bleeding won't stop) without probably having ever done a similar treatment . Have you encountered such experience in your personal life?
 
No..I would not recommend this.

Strokes are of 3 kinds:


1) Ischemic Strokes ..caused by obstruction of blood supply within a vessel that supplies blood to the brain.
87% of strokes are of this variety

2)Hemorrhagic Stroke ..which causes bleeding as a result of rupture of a malformed blood vessel or an aneurysm.

3)Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) which is a mini stroke..caused by a temporary obstruction either due to a blood clot or any infected emboli.

The very fact that the writer of this method was not aware of the different types of strokes and took it for granted that strokes are only caused by bleeding blood vessels....already casts a doubt on its authenticity.

Further more why make patient bleed and introduce infections in that process.

Your 1, 2, 3 points are valid. As for the hemorrhagic stroke the treatment may not help. The statement made there as "rupture of capillaries" is unfortunate. But I will not discount the method in its entirety because of that statement. Hemorrhagic strokes are few and far between, anyway.
 

prasad1

Active member
Let me stop you in your tracks just there. Even the chinese treatment says it is just a first-aid and nobody is recommending to stop there. While you call the ambulance and wait for it do this first-aid so that it does not get complicated. The stroke-caused damage can be enormous with passage of time. Even in the US metro area an ambulance can take a minimum of half an hour.

You are reading some dot com site and prescribe something about which even cardiologists are contending with each other. You know most doctors are so ignorant about the causal factors of stroke. They think atrial fibrillation is the main cause for stroke. They contend that atrial fibrillation (Afib) makes the blood pool in the lower chamber of the heart and causes clotting of blood which can travel towards the brain. But in 85% of stroke occurrences , there is no Afib. It is a general condition in the vascular system. I explained in my previous message about it. Pl read that. Also instead of reading about com and old wives sites, buy and read the book I suggested. The epidemiology and causal factors of stroke are explained there.

Even if you are a medical doctor I will not pay attention to what you are stating. Apparently you do not know the basics behind ischemic attacks, stroke, and bleeding. First, if it is a clot-caused stroke there is no reason to believe that the person will bleed profusely with a pinprick. As the blood thickens due to dehydration, the situation is favorable for clot formation. If you are on coumadin, yes there is that risk. If aspirin is taken in limited quantities I suggested (100 mg per day)there is no risk of bleeding either. Besides almost nobody is using aspirin these days as pain-killers. If the person is on heparin there would not have been a clot in the first place. Heparin is usually administered under hospital settings, not taken by the patient at home as a tablet. As for spasmodic cause, many times it is temporary and resolves itself before emergency personnel arrive. But a minor intervention as suggested is not going to cause problems.

I repeat nobody is suggesting to stay put without calling 911.


Mr. Mahakavi ji,
For your information: I was reading dot.com but you failed to note that the comment was by Dr. Jose Vega
Dr. Jose Vega




Dr. Jose L Vega, MD is a male with 14 years of medical experience and practices in Emergency Medicine.
Coral Gables Hospital




Read more: Dr. Jose Vega, MD - Emergency Physician - Miami, FL - Emergency Medicine

Dr. Jose Vega MD, PhD
Neurologist - Miami, FL

Dr. Jose Vega specializes in neurology in Miami, Florida.


Secondly I am not dispensing snake oil treatment either. I know what I do not know. LOL
 
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One swallow does not a summer make!
Ask him, if you have access to him, if he says all strokes are caused by Afib. If he says "yes" I will present him with epidemiological evidence to the contrary.

The medical community is always up in arms with any preventive approaches (because it robs them of their clientele) and if a practice will kill the prescription business then they are certainly against it. My own PCP was defending Avandia when I pointed out its ill effects. I fired him soon after. Now it is well known that avandia is biting dust.

For a long time they were content with coumadin (warfarin is the trademarked proprietary drug which lost its patent long ago) as a prophylactic drug for preventing stroke. Now the drug companies are coming up with newer generation drugs (like pradaxa and its cousins) to interfere with the clotting mechanistic process (to boost their revenue) with the blessings of the medical community. The reason they want to do away with coumadin is that it is a cheap but very effective drug like aspirin. They can't make money on it.

As I said elsewhere they were opposed to the mechanism proposed by Australian scientists 30 years ago when they suggested that GERD/stomach ulcer is due to infection by Helicobacter pylori. It was shown and accepted later that it was really the case and could be treated with cheap antibiotics rather than expensive proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium and its cousins. Still this expensive habit goes on. The PPI just relieves the symptoms but does not treat the disease.

I am not saying to do away with doctors. We need them for essential services and the surgeons for life-saving techniques. What I am against is their dogma. Many dogmas do not survive the test of time. Not all doctors are party to this, I might add. I have an MD daughter who breaks barriers.
 
I got the following information forwarded to me recently. I cannot vouch for its authenticity. Since it is a medical information, I request some of our members who are Doctors by profession to go through the information and advise whether this method is used as an approved First aid .

Brahmanyan,
Bangalore.


Sir:
I'd suggest you talk to your family doctor about this. Simply ask him/her "As a first aid, before the ambulance arrives, is this procedure helpful or harmful?". The doctor should be able to explain to you in easy to understand language (not medical jargon) the process involved, the remedial measures involved, and the consequences. If the doctor does not explain to you in plain language, find another doctor. He/she may disagree with the procedure. That is OK. There are always opinions and counter-opinions. It was in olden times you considered the doctor equal to god. Nowadays you have got to question the doctor and not just listen and obey when he/she says "take this pill 3 times a day". I am a bio-medical scientist and my doctor knows that. He is very careful when he talks to me.

As an aside, many doctors quit learning new advances from new research articles in medical journals. They are more concerned with standard treatments. They also have "no time" to read. Most of them get their knowledge about drugs and their effects (including side effects) from the medical reps who in turn get a "crash" course from the drug company researchers. If this sounds cynical, it is but also factual.
 

prasad1

Active member
Mr. Brahmanyan,
How do we know someone is having a stroke?
Can a layman differentiate between a stroke and 1000 other possible ailments?
 
Pricking finger tip is the first step to get blood drop sample for glucose test!

By using sterile needle you are not going to infect the patient. As for bleeding at the fingertips it sill stop by itself soon since the clotting process will work to prevent excessive bleeding.
 
Some doctors learn from the medical representatives; sometimes the patients have to wait when the rep is giving samples of new medicines and extols their virtue!

As an aside, many doctors quit learning new advances from new research articles in medical journals. They are more concerned with standard treatments. They also have "no time" to read. Most of them get their knowledge about drugs and their effects (including side effects) from the medical reps who in turn get a "crash" course from the drug company researchers. If this sounds cynical, it is but also factual.
 
Mr. Brahmanyan,
How do we know someone is having a stroke?
Can a layman differentiate between a stroke and 1000 other possible ailments?

Yes, a layman can recognize when a stroke hits him. Here are the signs:
1. Numbness in face , arm, and/or leg----one side only. Usually if the left side artery is blocked the right side feels the effect and vice versa.
2. The patient will be confused. Slurred speech
3. Trouble speaking/understanding
4. Difficulty in walking.
5. Dizziness
6. Loss of balance/coordination
7. Severe headache.

Transient Ischemic Attacks are not that severe. You can be walking and you might experience some of the synptoms. My colleague, Dr. James Crawford, experienced a stroke when he was cutting grass. He stopped mowing and walked into the house and slumped in the chair. After a few minutes of dizziness he came back to himself. Then his wife drove him to the hospital. He has recovered now with some damage to his left side. But he can walk and drive. He wrote the book after gathering all his experience as a stroke patient and after doing elaborate meta research.
 
Pricking finger tip is the first step to get blood drop sample for glucose test!

You are right. You use tiny lancets which are commercially available in sterile package. As an extra precaution you should wipe the area of the finger with an alcohol swab (to prevent any surface contamination from entering the blood stream) and wipe off the blood and clean the surface with the same swab after the sample has been drawn into glucose strip to prevent any further infection.
 

prasad1

Active member
Is Dr. James Crawford a layman?

Dr. Crawford is a scientist with a fifty year history of biomedical research.
 
Is Dr. James Crawford a layman?

Dr. Crawford is a scientist with a fifty year history of biomedical research.

I did not say Dr. Crawford as a layman.

My post contained two sections. The first part mentioned the symptoms that can be recognized by the layman in simple language.

The second part described what kind of stroke, how did it manifest, and what were the consequences since he shared those experiences with me.

If you tried to make a connection between the two parts, it is like tying moTTait talai with muzhangAl.

In one sense all of us are laymen. Unless you personally experience a stroke for a second time when you can recall the first stroke incident, you are a layman even if you are a doctor. When something hits you you are in a shock even though you may have read about it when it happened to others. Suppose we have a woman who is pregnant and gives birth to a baby, the obstetrician may be helping her deliver and knows the procedures. But he does not know the actual experience of the mother. Only the mother knows.
 

prasad1

Active member
Anybody can define a word as they want to suit their fancy.
There are standard definition which is accepted by the world.

A layperson or layman is a person who is not an expert in a given field of knowledge. The term originally meant a member of the laity, i.e. a non-clergymen, but over the centuries shifted in definition.
The concept of describing something in layman's terms has come into wide use in the English-speaking world. To put something in layman's terms is to describe a complex or technical issue using words and terms that the average individual (someone without professional training in the subject area) can understand, so that they may comprehend the issue to some degree.


A layman can not detect a stroke. An EMT person may hypothesis a stroke and act accordingly. The Emergency room physician after diagnosis and scans may come to a preliminary diagnosis of stroke. The radiologist will confirm the diagnosis after full study. The doctor treating him may treat for the stroke.

Bleeding a person for treatment was 14th century method.
 

DR.C.NARAYANI

Active member
Very Good Morning Brahmanyan sir, Yes sir I received this as a forward mail a couple of weeks ago.,sir one thing we have to be clear to know certain things that are very vital for all. this STROKE condition occur mainly due to disturbance / block to the higher centers -brain . afall /faint can occur due to many conditions due to origin ,but to find the proper diagonisis and eventually implication of treatment is very crucial. a victim due to STROKE ,can be asked to elicit few actions ,there by the rush for treatment is done at once ,here TIME is the vital factor ,when delayed can result in medical emergency,permanent damages. the victim /person can be asked 1. to rise the arm/arms 2. to smile 3.to attempt to speak /talk few words 4.to attempt few steps to walk. these few steps can very easily assist , identify the true picture as a person when being attack by stroke cannot elicit proper smile ,the affected side on face get deviated ,cannot talk ,pronounce few words ,leads to slurred speech ,he / she cannot move his/ her arms ,legs to elicit the action of walk ,raising the arms of the affected site. so these take only few minutes to know the picture of patient ,and at once has to be taken to the hospital for the proper treatment ,as first hand line of treatment ASPIRIN has to be given .hope that one knows the value of time and people.
 
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