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Origin of Rig veda

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athreya70

New member
The origins of the Rig Veda is invariably linked to the Aryan invasion.

These Aryan marauders were from one of the two broad groups of the central Asian - Steppe Aryans and were the followers of Indra.

The other group consisted of the Zende-Avestans who were the followers of Varuna.

The Indra- followers, after prolonged conflict with the Zende-Avestans slowly migrated to the plains of Punjab. It appears that their migrations through the difficult Hindu-Kush mountains was made possible by up gradation of technology through acquisitions of chariots which enhanced their mobility. This invasion by the pastoralists seems to have paved way for the setting up of the Rig Vedic age in the Punjab plains. This theory seems to have force because of the common terminology of the names of the Gods used like Ignus - Agni, Soma, Mainyu – Manya, Daevas – Devas, etcFurther this commonality is strengthened by the fact that both these groups worshipped the Pancha Bhuthas for their well being.These non Zende-Avestans are supposed to have spoken a language which represented an older version of Sanskrit. Further, they were supposed to possess a poetic sense too.

Now presuming that this nomadic group of pastoralists came and influenced the early Rig Vedic period,the question of corresponding date/dates come into picture. As per the common theme on the books on this subject, this period corresponds to the second millennium BC.

But, however, accepting the above theory in the face of any inconclusive evidence (as hypothesized so far ) will result in the stalemate of authenticity of accuracy & place of the early Vedic period. This is more so in view of the certain near contradictory ancient occurrences as listed below:
a)The said ruralized Aryan groups were supposed to have run into the urbanized Harappan Civilization. The Harappan script shows clear links to the Vedic age as per the researches conducted by foreign scholars through deciphering of 4000 seals. It is an accepted proposition that the Indus Valley Populace was of local origin.

b)It is an accepted proposition that none of the Vedic verses mention anything about the ‘Original’ habitat of the Aryan invaders.

c)The origin of the glorious language of Sanskrit – though concluded to be of Central Asian origin-doesn’t necessarily establish that the early Vedic period belongs to the central Asian Aryans because of the simple fact that there was no large-scale migration of the Aryans from Central Asia to the plains of Punjab during such period.
The established links of the Indus script with the Rig Veda along with the fact that traces of Sanskrit language being present in all Indian languages throws out an interesting inverse hypothesis:

Though the earliest version of the Sanskrit language might have been imbibed from Central Asia through osmosis of cultures, the later version of language of Sanskrit used to construct the Rig Veda might have been indigenously developed.

Hence the Rig-Veda may be of indigenous origin.

Periyavar Sangom and other elders are requested to share your views on this.

Regards
Ganesh
 

sangom

Well-known member
Dear Shri Athreya,

A very brilliant start to your thread. I have read it carefully. Some of my doubts are as under:


The established links of the Indus script with the Rig Veda along with the fact that traces of Sanskrit language being present in all Indian languages throws out an interesting inverse hypothesis:


Is there any definitive finding to show that IV script is linked to Sanskrit or its earlier form? AFAIK the IV scripts have not yet been deciphered to the satisfaction of the scholars. Iravatam Mahadevan postulates that the language could have links to Tamizh or its earlier form, does not he?

The Indra- followers, after prolonged conflict with the Zende-Avestans slowly migrated to the plains of Punjab. It appears that their migrations through the difficult Hindu-Kush mountains was made possible by up gradation of technology through acquisitions of chariots which enhanced their mobility. This invasion by the pastoralists seems to have paved way for the setting up of the Rig Vedic age in the Punjab plains. This theory seems to have force because of the common terminology of the names of the Gods used like Ignus - Agni, Soma, Mainyu – Manya, Daevas – Devas, etcFurther this commonality is strengthened by the fact that both these groups worshipped the Pancha Bhuthas for their well being.These non Zende-Avestans are supposed to have spoken a language which represented an older version of Sanskrit. Further, they were supposed to possess a poetic sense too.


If the Indra followers and Zend-Avestans had conflict and fights, how can we explain the same or similar-sounding names in their pantheon, but the good and bad personalities reversed? Will it not mean that both had same or similar beliefs but when they fell out with each other, the gods of one group became the demons of the other? Otherwise we will have to accept that the avestans had some unknown pantheon originally, they came into conflict with the vedic people but somehow, for some strange reason, accepted the gods and demons of their enemies but reversed the image (mirror image); is this natural?

The said ruralized Aryan groups were supposed to have run into the urbanized Harappan Civilization. The Harappan script shows clear links to the Vedic age as per the researches conducted by foreign scholars through deciphering of 4000 seals. It is an accepted proposition that the Indus Valley Populace was of local origin.


If we accept the relative chronology of the ten books of the rgveda as approved by most scholars (including those who support the autochthonous aryan theory, I think), is it not the conclusion that the rgvedic people were nomads in the initial stages and settled cultivation comes in subsequently? (I am raising so many question marks because these doubts are from what remains in my memory; I am just requesting your clarification, not trying to put you down, please.)

It is an accepted proposition that none of the Vedic verses mention anything about the ‘Original’ habitat of the Aryan invaders.


In respect of soma, the divine herb, it is said that its origin could not be in the Ganga-Yamuna Doab, or even the punjab plains but the mountain slopes of the Hindukush. The fact that the zend also talks positively of haoma (i.e., soma), makes even the proposal of invading vedic people and avestans in conflict somewhat unrealistic, unless we grant that both of them had, in some remote, unknown past, they had a shared culture and belief system. So, indirectly we get some indication that the vedic people had intimate knowledge of the areas in the Hindukush.

The origin of the glorious language of Sanskrit – though concluded to be of Central Asian origin-doesn’t necessarily establish that the early Vedic period belongs to the central Asian Aryans because of the simple fact that there was no large-scale migration of the Aryans from Central Asia to the plains of Punjab during such period.


As I said, even the initial books of the rgveda do not show a settle pastoralist society. If such people - nomads - migrate we will probably have no archaeological evidence to estimate their number. But the assumption that only a small trickle of such people came from central asia, mingled with the Harappans, developed the vedic sanskrit (which is different from modern - Panini's - sanskrit) as also the large rgvedic literature, it is somewhat impossible. For, the composition of such an immense volume of highly magnificent prosody, it would require either a handful of geniuses or a sufficiently large number of people with a sense of expressing their observations and feelings in poesy. Whether the Harappans had such ability is not known.

Also, I do not know whether linguists have now agreed that the development of avestan into the pre-rgvedic or rgvedic language could be justified on the basis of the small trickle of people who came down to the Punjab plains after prolonged conflict with the avestans. It usually requires a large initial group to override the existing tongue; a small group gets lost though some words from this might find its way into the existing tongue, the Harappan, in this case.

I do not know how far my doubts are relevant and how far they reveal my ignorance. Please forgive me if some of my doubts are offensive.
 

Brahmanyan

Well-known member
The origins of the Rig Veda is invariably linked to the Aryan invasion.

These Aryan marauders were from one of the two broad groups of the central Asian - Steppe Aryans and were the followers of Indra.

The other group consisted of the Zende-Avestans who were the followers of Varuna.

The Indra- followers, after prolonged conflict with the Zende-Avestans slowly migrated to the plains of Punjab. It appears that their migrations through the difficult Hindu-Kush mountains was made possible by up gradation of technology through acquisitions of chariots which enhanced their mobility. This invasion by the pastoralists seems to have paved way for the setting up of the Rig Vedic age in the Punjab plains. This theory seems to have force because of the common terminology of the names of the Gods used like Ignus - Agni, Soma, Mainyu – Manya, Daevas – Devas, etcFurther this commonality is strengthened by the fact that both these groups worshipped the Pancha Bhuthas for their well being.These non Zende-Avestans are supposed to have spoken a language which represented an older version of Sanskrit. Further, they were supposed to possess a poetic sense too.

Now presuming that this nomadic group of pastoralists came and influenced the early Rig Vedic period,the question of corresponding date/dates come into picture. As per the common theme on the books on this subject, this period corresponds to the second millennium BC.

But, however, accepting the above theory in the face of any inconclusive evidence (as hypothesized so far ) will result in the stalemate of authenticity of accuracy & place of the early Vedic period. This is more so in view of the certain near contradictory ancient occurrences as listed below:
a)The said ruralized Aryan groups were supposed to have run into the urbanized Harappan Civilization. The Harappan script shows clear links to the Vedic age as per the researches conducted by foreign scholars through deciphering of 4000 seals. It is an accepted proposition that the Indus Valley Populace was of local origin.

b)It is an accepted proposition that none of the Vedic verses mention anything about the ‘Original’ habitat of the Aryan invaders.

c)The origin of the glorious language of Sanskrit – though concluded to be of Central Asian origin-doesn’t necessarily establish that the early Vedic period belongs to the central Asian Aryans because of the simple fact that there was no large-scale migration of the Aryans from Central Asia to the plains of Punjab during such period.
The established links of the Indus script with the Rig Veda along with the fact that traces of Sanskrit language being present in all Indian languages throws out an interesting inverse hypothesis:

Though the earliest version of the Sanskrit language might have been imbibed from Central Asia through osmosis of cultures, the later version of language of Sanskrit used to construct the Rig Veda might have been indigenously developed.

Hence the Rig-Veda may be of indigenous origin.

Periyavar Sangom and other elders are requested to share your views on this.

Regards
Ganesh

Dear Sri Ganesh (Athreya),

Aryan invasion theory is based on the present Geographical divisions. People moved from region to region for generations in search of friendly climate and agricultural land.Why can't we accept it as migration by tribes. Migrants bring their way of life and culture along with them. In Mahabharata times the Land of Bharatavarsha was not confined to western Himalyas. We consider Gandhari a princess of Gandhara or Kandahar in present day Afghanistan. Kushan ruler Kanishka's capital was Purushapura (Peshawar). Prior to refinement of Sanskrit as a written language, it is said the spoken language among the common people was dialects of Prakrit.
I am not a scholar in the subject but as one who is interested in the subject of etymology, I am eager to know more about this.

Please continue,
Regards,
Brahmanyan,
Bangalore.
 

sangom

Well-known member
Dear Sri Ganesh (Athreya),

Aryan invasion theory is based on the present Geographical divisions. People moved from region to region for generations in search of friendly climate and agricultural land.Why can't we accept it as migration by tribes. Migrants bring their way of life and culture along with them. In Mahabharata times the Land of Bharatavarsha was not confined to western Himalyas. We consider Gandhari a princess of Gandhara or Kandahar in present day Afghanistan. Kushan ruler Kanishka's capital was Purushapura (Peshawar). Prior to refinement of Sanskrit as a written language, it is said the spoken language among the common people was dialects of Prakrit.
I am not a scholar in the subject but as one who is interested in the subject of etymology, I am eager to know more about this.

Please continue,
Regards,
Brahmanyan,
Bangalore.

Dear Shri Brahmanyan,

The Aryan Invasion Theory, as I have understood it, is based on the ancient landscape only - not today's geographical divisions. But it hypothesized an out and out invasion scenario, from the present day eastern Iran and Afghanistan down the Hindukush into the Sindhu regions and gradually extending towards the north. But this "out and out invasion scenario", is no longer advanced by even the western experts on this subject. Instead, they propose a "migration" scenario, which is opposed by those swearing by the "autochthonous aryans" theory.

Shri Athreya is also not suggesting an invasion theory, but only saying that the rigvedic people must have come from the NW after prolonged conflict with the people in today's eastern Afghanistan, etc. This will explain the similarity and the mirror-image pantheon of the avesta and the rigveda.

This migration and the original compilation of the rigveda must definitely have been much earlier to the composing of the Mahabharata, by which time familiarity and social intercourse with the western regions must have become normal; still, the concept of a vast "Bharata Varsha" must have been from some memories of old and it might have provoked the author of the M.Bh. to include gandhara, etc., in his epic. The actual scene of the M.Bh. war is, as everyone knows, Kurukshetra.

I would like Shri Athreya to elucidate.
 
OP
OP
A

athreya70

New member
Sirs,
My humble thanks for taking my submissions on the issue quite seriously.

The link between the Indus –Valley and the Rg-Veda has almost been formalized in the form of a research book ‘The Indus Script and the Rg-Veda’ – which is authored by a German Scholar Mr. Egbert Richter-Ushanas. In reality, the findings in this book (first published in 1997) should have been a topic of debate among our Historian-Scholars. Maybe the well-entrenched thought that the Indus script can ‘never’ be deciphered has enveloped the minds of the Historians. Anyway, since I am not an Historian – and being just its humble student, I venture to present you my thoughts accumulated on this topic.

Yes Sir, it appears that the Zend-Avesthans and the Indra followers were earlier part of the same group. Probably they fought only on the question of the Leadership issue. Further, there would be no controversy on the commonality of the ‘seeds of original thought’ between the Central Asians and the early Rg-Vedic thought. But my question here is whether the factors leading to the onset of the early Rg-Vedic age were borne out of osmosis and reverse osmosis of ideas and transfusion of Language? (Particularly in the light of revelations of Mr. Egbert’s findings!).

Further, there is no residue left in the region of Central Asia of the traces of the glorious language of Sanskrit- historically speaking of course. Or, were the plains of Punjab a recognized laboratory for the researches of the Aryan Seers to experiment with Brahmanic thoughts?

Coming to the issue of the geographic countours from which flowered the mighty Rg- Vedic verses , can we ignore the region of South India?- and of course , the sages from the South as well ? Was not Agastyar - a south Indian Rishi? By the way the forests of Kodaikanal was supposed to be a Laboratory for Sages to experiment with herbs grown therein.

Again , coming to the age of the Rg-vedic period, it almost zooms back to the period prior to the period the supposed Aryan interaction took place- which again throws up some interesting questions in my humble view :

i) The onset of the Rg-vedic period may be born out of Osmosis of ideas (both ways) .
ii) The place of Sumerkhand might have been the cradle for these seedlings to disperse(both ways).
iii) Various ‘theological’ groups interested in researching might have migrated themselves across the mountains.( It seems the original homeland of the Mishras of UP is from a place called Misr in Iran).

Further, it may be a fact that the early version of Sanskrit, Greek and Latin were all Aryan Languages – but this does not preclude the subsequent enhancement of the language of Sanskrit through its further bases .

My broad views may sound perverse- but I do stand corrected an any point I have put forth in the light of any mathematical arguments against the same.

Regards,
Ganesh.
 

sangom

Well-known member
Dear Shri Athreya,

It seems from a perusal of web pages and reviews of Ushanas' book (his real name is
Egbert Richter but he goes under the pen name of Richter-Ushanas, after uśánas, a Vedic rishi) that it is at best pseudo-scientific. Reportedly, the author himself states that his decipherment is based on intuition. Hence, my view is that we should not build a theory on the basis of Egbert Richter Ushanas' revelations. It is relevant to note that other decipherers do not claim infallibility for their findings since there is no rosetta stone in this case. From a reading of several articles and books on the indus script, it appears to me that the most probable method of approaching their decipherment is to consider them as primarily tags or labels for export consignments of goods by the sea. The symbols in each seal may denote the manufacturer's unique logo and the script part may give details of the consignment
and about its delivery.

In any discussion of the hoary past of the vedic people or avestans, we should also take into account the excavations at Nemrut Dag, Goebekli tepe, Nevali Cori, etc., in Turkey and the find of a statue of a Head with a sikha, in the remains from those excavations. This would show that some culture or civilization very similar to the brahmanic one flourished in Anatolia even much before (c.7500 BCE) the generally assumed date of the vedas of 2000 BCE. Also, it is interesting to note that, as per experts, the Nevali Cori people deliberately covered the area with soil, perhaps to preserve it for posterity! It was not destroyed or abandoned as in IVC.

It looks to me, therefore, that the seeds of the vedic tradition must have begun in very early periods around Anatolia regions and spread to the Mitanni and Hittite kingdoms, as evidenced by the Kikkuli horse-training documents. From there it could have spread eastwards to the present day Iran/Afghanistan where, most probably, one set of people started giving more attention to image or totem worship while the orthodox group stuck to the old fire worship steadfastly. This became a point of conflict and the totem-worshippers spread further east to the Punjab, may be by osmosis. One reason for our ancestors holding the view that the vedas are "anAdi" and "apourushEya" might be the fact that they had some hazy ideas about the dim past but were not able to have any clear picture about those times or areas, IMO. So, just as children's stories start with the phrase, "Once long ago, in a certain country..." they said this was beginningless (we don't know when it started) and not man-made (we don't know who composed these or how these were composed).

This totem worship hypothesis can be found in the book, "The Hymns of Atharvan
Zarathustra" by Shri Jatindra Mohan Chatterji, M.A. and published by the Parsi Zoroastrian Association, Calcutta, 1967.

I will try to give relevant extracts therefrom in my next post.




 
S

SwamiTaBra

Guest
Sirs,
My humble thanks for taking my submissions on the issue quite seriously.

The link between the Indus –Valley and the Rg-Veda has almost been formalized in the form of a research book ‘The Indus Script and the Rg-Veda’ – which is authored by a German Scholar Mr. Egbert Richter-Ushanas. In reality, the findings in this book (first published in 1997) should have been a topic of debate among our Historian-Scholars. Maybe the well-entrenched thought that the Indus script can ‘never’ be deciphered has enveloped the minds of the Historians. Anyway, since I am not an Historian – and being just its humble student, I venture to present you my thoughts accumulated on this topic.

Yes Sir, it appears that the Zend-Avesthans and the Indra followers were earlier part of the same group. Probably they fought only on the question of the Leadership issue. Further, there would be no controversy on the commonality of the ‘seeds of original thought’ between the Central Asians and the early Rg-Vedic thought. But my question here is whether the factors leading to the onset of the early Rg-Vedic age were borne out of osmosis and reverse osmosis of ideas and transfusion of Language? (Particularly in the light of revelations of Mr. Egbert’s findings!).

Further, there is no residue left in the region of Central Asia of the traces of the glorious language of Sanskrit- historically speaking of course. Or, were the plains of Punjab a recognized laboratory for the researches of the Aryan Seers to experiment with Brahmanic thoughts?

Coming to the issue of the geographic countours from which flowered the mighty Rg- Vedic verses , can we ignore the region of South India?- and of course , the sages from the South as well ? Was not Agastyar - a south Indian Rishi? By the way the forests of Kodaikanal was supposed to be a Laboratory for Sages to experiment with herbs grown therein.

Again , coming to the age of the Rg-vedic period, it almost zooms back to the period prior to the period the supposed Aryan interaction took place- which again throws up some interesting questions in my humble view :

i) The onset of the Rg-vedic period may be born out of Osmosis of ideas (both ways) .
ii) The place of Sumerkhand might have been the cradle for these seedlings to disperse(both ways).
iii) Various ‘theological’ groups interested in researching might have migrated themselves across the mountains.( It seems the original homeland of the Mishras of UP is from a place called Misr in Iran).

Further, it may be a fact that the early version of Sanskrit, Greek and Latin were all Aryan Languages – but this does not preclude the subsequent enhancement of the language of Sanskrit through its further bases .

My broad views may sound perverse- but I do stand corrected an any point I have put forth in the light of any mathematical arguments against the same.

Regards,
Ganesh.

"Further, there is no residue left in the region of Central Asia of the traces of the glorious language of Sanskrit- historically speaking of course. Or, were the plains of Punjab a recognized laboratory for the researches of the Aryan Seers to experiment with Brahmanic thoughts? "

My response:

Bettany Hughes, a British historian has reported to have unravelled evidences somewhere from central Russia on proto-Aryan languages. Kindly look into them.

Rgds.,
Swami
 

sangom

Well-known member
"Further, there is no residue left in the region of Central Asia of the traces of the glorious language of Sanskrit- historically speaking of course. Or, were the plains of Punjab a recognized laboratory for the researches of the Aryan Seers to experiment with Brahmanic thoughts? "

My response:

Bettany Hughes, a British historian has reported to have unravelled evidences somewhere from central Russia on proto-Aryan languages. Kindly look into them.

Rgds.,
Swami

Shri Swami,

I do not find any material to the point stated by you. Kindly furnish the references.
 

sangom

Well-known member
I read a small news item that appeared in the New Indian Express a couple of months back. I'm unable to retrieve that now.
May be you can try to reach her through her website: Bettany Hughes - official website - historian, author, broadcaster

With regards,
Swami

Swami,

I tried that website, google books and google search to see whether there is any mention of Betty Hughes plus proto-aryan; the result was nil. This person comes out as a favoured beauty as well!
 
S

SwamiTaBra

Guest
Swami,

I tried that website, google books and google search to see whether there is any mention of Betty Hughes plus proto-aryan; the result was nil. This person comes out as a favoured beauty as well!

As a last recourse you could send a mail to her : [email protected]
or try to contact via Facebook..

Rgds.,
Swami
 

B.Krishnamurthy

Active member
Dear Shri.Sangom,
Please go to "www.bettaney hughes.co.uk/news/html.
I could open the link and there is some mention about the news referred to by Shri.Swami.
 
Last edited:
S

SwamiTaBra

Guest
Dear Shri.Sangom,
Please go to "www.bettaney hughes.co.uk/news/html.
I could open the link and there is some mention about the news referred to by Shri.Swami.

Sir,

Thank you very much. You have better eye (or concentration) than I have despite being older.

Regards,
Swami
 
S

SwamiTaBra

Guest
Swami,

I tried that website, google books and google search to see whether there is any mention of Betty Hughes plus proto-aryan; the result was nil. This person comes out as a favoured beauty as well!

Dear Sri. Sangom,

I have copied and pasted the relevant extract from her website:

eptember 9th BBC Radio 3, 9pm 'Tracking the Aryans' - The result of our trip to the Siberian/Kazakhstan borders and to the Bronze Age site of Arkaim. Some claim this was a homeland to the Aryans, and a missing link back to proto-Indo-European, the mother tongue of 50% of the world’s population. During the wild summer solstice rituals there we met both the archaeologists working on the site and the Russian visitors in search of an identity.

Hope you find it useful.

Rgds,
Swami
 

sangom

Well-known member
Dear Sri. Sangom,

I have copied and pasted the relevant extract from her website:

eptember 9th BBC Radio 3, 9pm 'Tracking the Aryans' - The result of our trip to the Siberian/Kazakhstan borders and to the Bronze Age site of Arkaim. Some claim this was a homeland to the Aryans, and a missing link back to proto-Indo-European, the mother tongue of 50% of the world’s population. During the wild summer solstice rituals there we met both the archaeologists working on the site and the Russian visitors in search of an identity.

Hope you find it useful.

Rgds,
Swami

Dear Shri Swami,

I also came across the above excerpt and then googled to get the details of the Arkaim finds. It seems there are no evidences as to the dialect or speech of the Arkaim people but the close semblance to the sites in Turkey such as Nevali Cori, makes the Arkaim finds yet another stellar observatory built to un believable precision - as per the available technology of those times. Thus the Arkaim people must have been similar to the Nevali Cori people and so, having the characteristics of the vedic people. We don't have any more details in the public domain about expert findings, if any, specific to Arkaim.
 

saidevo

Well-known member
namaste.

Since the subject of AIT/AMT is vast, changing, controversial and takes up much time even to read about, I have not updated myself on it beyond what I read some years ago from the following links. I am sharing them here for any use to anyone interested, with no further personal opinion from me on the subject except that the AIT has been practically disproved and even the BBC has withdrawn it from its Website, as I heard sometime back.

Swamiji Shyamenandra

This sage used to maintain some years back an interesting Website at swamishyam.org where he proposed what he called an 'Intergalactic History' of Vedic civilization with his findings and opinions in several articles. This Website no longer survives, although the sage is still around here in such links as:

Swami Shyamendra Yogi
AUM » Swami Shyamendra
Antarbrahmandiya Sanskriti Kendra: An Introduction

Some the articles from his old Website, however, are still found on the Net, which include:

'Vedic Heritage Still Survives' by
Vedik World Heritage Articles

'Lovetrance Race and The Aryan Civilization'
TRUE WORLD HISTORY-Lovetrance Race and  The Aryan Civilization

Internet is so resilient that it can even bring back a dead Website!
Here is the link I found just now to the old Website of swamishyam.org
Everybody's Guide to Human Common Sense

Here is a chain of Websites:
Vedik World Heritage
 

happyhindu

Well-known member
The link between the Indus –Valley and the Rg-Veda has almost been formalized in the form of a research book ‘The Indus Script and the Rg-Veda’ – which is authored by a German Scholar Mr. Egbert Richter-Ushanas.
The word for "brick" does not exist in the rigveda. But Indus Valley Civilisation (IVC) was almost fully constructed of bricks. Based on many such evidences, linguistic evidence and possible map routes (meaning those on which travel is possible), Frits Stal puts forth the theory that Rig veda was composed to the west of IVC. And that wud be the current Afghan-Iran areas.

Further, there is no residue left in the region of Central Asia of the traces of the glorious language of Sanskrit- historically speaking of course. Or, were the plains of Punjab a recognized laboratory for the researches of the Aryan Seers to experiment with Brahmanic thoughts?
Am not sure what you wud mean by 'brahmanic thots'. However, when it comes to language, please do remember and take into consideration that the language of the BMAC is currently being reconstructed. So let us wait. According to Staal, the language of the BMAC is supposed to be of 'non-indo european' origin (!!) ....interesting isn't it...
 

prasanth1

Member
The link between the Indus Valley Civilization and anything has certainly not been formalized. There is in particular a severe cultural discrepancy between the culture of the Indus Valley (or what can be derived from it) and that of Indo European tribes of the time. The language has been associated with several roots as well, with much stronger cases being made elsewhere than with Indo-European.
 

Iyyarooraan

Well-known member
Date of VedAs

Shri C. Kunhan Raja, Ph.D. (Oxon) Professor of Sanskrit at the Universities of Madras, Teheran and Andhra, had opined the date to be about 1400 B.C. subject to correction. His book "The Quintessence of the Rigveda" published (1964) by M/s D.B. Taraporevala.. is worth reading,too.
 

srikrish85

Member
AIT.... what.... thw whole world phoo-phoos it but the we Indians carry it pn our heads.... Hmm.... a colonial mindset indeed...
 

rsundarr

New member
Sir,
I have a doubt. Pardon me for my ignorance.
I understand that many grains including black gram, barley, paddy etc., are mentioned in Rg Veda. I am unclear whether these grains, particularly black gram, was grown in the areas of Hindu Kush in those days to find a mention in Rg veda;
 
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