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Now reservation for economically backward also!!!

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GANESH65

Active member
[h=1]Balancing act: How will the 10% quota for EBCs affect the 2017 Gujarat election?

For the past few months the Gujarat government was stuck between the Constitution and Hardik Patel. It has finally found a solution by getting on the right side of Patel and on the wrong side of the Constitution.[/h]
On Friday, the Gujarat government announced a ten per cent quota for economically backward classes in the state. The new category of proposed beneficiaries is aimed at pacifying the Patidars, whose leader Patel had launched a violent agitation for reservation in 2015.
According to the state government, the new category would include members of all general categories (the ones not included in SC/ST and OBC) with family income less than Rs 6 lakh. Chief minister Anandiben Patel has promised to issue an ordinance on 1 May for the new quota.
Prima facie the BJP formula for appeasing the Patidars is a replica of the solution it had proffered for Gurjars of Rajasthan. In 2008, the Vasundhara Raje government had extended 5 per cent reservation to a special category of backwards that included Gurjars and another 14 per cent quota to economically backward classes.
Pushed into a corner by Patel and his supporters, chief minister Anandiben Patel had no other option but to find a please-all solution before the assembly elections in 2017. Patidars are almost 15 per cent of Gujarat's population and their support could be decisive in the polls, especially because they are among the BJP's core vote bank.
The BJP's problem was that it could not have placated the Patidars without annoying other communities in the state. While the OBCs were opposing any change in the existing quota pattern, various other caste currently out of the reserved category had started their own movements for being included in the list of beneficiaries.
http://s2.firstpost.in/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/HARDIK_PATEL_AFP2.jpg


Over the past few months, a movement seen as a counter to the Patidar stir had started gathering momentum under Alpesh Thakor, an OBC leader. In January, Thakor had organised a huge convention in Ahmedabad, ostensibly against bootlegging and liquor addiction in the dry state. But he also founded a forum comprising OBC, SC and ST groups seeking to protect the existing reservation system.
Many believe that Thakor, 39, has been propped up by the Gujarat CM as a counter to Hardik Patel who is currently in jail on sedition charges slapped on him by the state after the violent agitation by Patidars last year. Others believe Thakor is backed by the Congress, which is eyeing a comeback in the state by stoking the quota fire. Thakor's father Khodabhai is a Congress leader.
By floating the idea of ten percent reservation for the economically backward, the BJP is trying to appease both the Patidars and the OBCs.
Will the solution work?
Gujarat currently has 49 per cent reservation, the same as in Rajasthan before the Gurjar stir. So, the recent decision, if implemented, is bound to be challenged in the court since it would breach the 50 per cent ceiling imposed by the Supreme Court in its 1992 Indra Sawhney vs Union of India judgment.
To avoid being challenged legally, the Gujarat government would try to get the new law — once it is passed by the state — in the Ninth Schedule by the Centre. The Constitution provides protection from judicial scrutiny to any legislation placed in this schedule.
But, similar attempts by various governments to breach the 50 per cent ceiling have failed in the past. The Gujarat government's decision is likely to meet the same fate.
The 14 per cent reservation for EBCs and 5 per cent for Special Backward Classes, including Gurjars, passed by the Rajasthan government in 2008 was stayed by the high court. Earlier attempts by Karnataka and Orissa assemblies to provide quota in excess of 50 per cent were also foiled by various courts and tribunals.
The SC is also reviewing the decision of the Tamil Nadu government to provide 69 per cent reservation in the state.
The BJP, however, may not be too concerned about the fate of its recent decision. Just like in Haryana — where Jats were recently promised reservation after a violent stir — and Rajasthan, it has bought some time from quota activists by taking a political decision.
By the time the courts review the decision and announce their verdict, the 2017 elections would have been held in the state. And the outcome of the election, not its new promise, is the only thing that matters for the BJP.



(courtsey first post)
 
For this to pass the legal hurdle the 50% cap on reservation has to be passed by both Houses of Parliament and enter the statute books
 

tbs

0
For this to pass the legal hurdle the 50% cap on reservation has to be passed by both Houses of Parliament and enter the statute books
hi

tamil nadu is example for everybody.....TN has 69%.....why not others?.....
 

tbs

0
For this to pass the legal hurdle the 50% cap on reservation has to be passed by both Houses of Parliament and enter the statute books
hi

may be possible....tamil nadu is example for 69%....why not others?
 
TN was considered an exception in 80's...Now that is becoming the norm in many states but that FC's are also being considered for reservation in other states means that the hate (of Brahmins) politics of kazhagams will not cut ice in the rest of the country
 
In Gujarat there is a demand for increasing the EBC reservation to 20%...In India no one will give anything on a platter..You have to fight for it!
 
How come this important news which has positive implications for the beleaguered & hapless TB's finds no responses??
 
In cetnral government jobs, in promotion also there is a reservation point system.

Suppose if a general category employee gets his next promotion after 22 / 25 years years of service........... a Scheduled caste of the same batch gets it in 12 years and ST would get in 8 years.

What about me? when I will get my next promotion? ................asked a TB.
Immediately you can get the demotion or frustration ...........is the answer.
 
Last edited:

Brahmanyan

Active member
Reservations are hindrance to progress. It was the denial of Government jobs to the community, made the Tamil Brahmins to think differently and venture into different fields and migrate to other Countries to earn their living. Intelligence and and hard work will never fail any one.
Today the treatment meted out to IAS and IPS officers by the Politicians has driven many of the intelligent officers to leave the Service or seek transfer to agencies out side India.

Let us not lament on denial of reservation.

Brahmanyan,
Bangalore.
 

kunjuppu

Active member
while there is almost unanimous view of reservation here in this forum, in the world outside, in tamil nadu, almost every person outside our caste has welcomed reservations. and have benefited from it, to various degrees. in terms of social engineering, i think, it achieved what its goal.

all of them have said, written, that reservation broke the stranglehold that tamil brahmins had on government jobs. and for the first time, folks from the poorest of the poor, could hope for education and upward mobility. kamaraj's mid day lunch scheme, opposed by cho at one time, have proved that unless the weakest of the community is helped to be uplifted, there is no vimochanam for them.

in such cases of extreme poverty, the power holders were violently removed. as is the case of revolutionary france, russia, china, vietnam, cambodia among others. atleast we have to be grateful, that the social revolution of tamil nadu/india has been peaceful.

the times were also favourable to us. with technology and travel, we could seek opportunities wherever available. just imagine, if it were the 1960s, 70s, with only a few colleges, and very little opportunities. the 1990s I.T. was a further boon.

ultimately, the best way to financial independence, is to be an entrepreneur. start your own business. learn how to run a business. communities like chettiars, nadars, the gujarati patels, and even a vast section of muslims, do not simply care about reservations.

there may be superficial political agitations among the patels, but i think, for most of them, starting a dhookan is more important, than earning a degree, as a path to wealth and prosperity.

today, there is probably a need to re visit the concept of reservations. but any such suggestions coming from us, is suspect. let the current beneficiaries work it out. meanwhile, wherever we can, let us help anyone in our community, on a one on one basis, or as a group effort, to uplift their opportunities.
 

tbs

0
while there is almost unanimous view of reservation here in this forum, in the world outside, in tamil nadu, almost every person outside our caste has welcomed reservations. and have benefited from it, to various degrees. in terms of social engineering, i think, it achieved what its goal.

all of them have said, written, that reservation broke the stranglehold that tamil brahmins had on government jobs. and for the first time, folks from the poorest of the poor, could hope for education and upward mobility. kamaraj's mid day lunch scheme, opposed by cho at one time, have proved that unless the weakest of the community is helped to be uplifted, there is no vimochanam for them.

in such cases of extreme poverty, the power holders were violently removed. as is the case of revolutionary france, russia, china, vietnam, cambodia among others. atleast we have to be grateful, that the social revolution of tamil nadu/india has been peaceful.

the times were also favourable to us. with technology and travel, we could seek opportunities wherever available. just imagine, if it were the 1960s, 70s, with only a few colleges, and very little opportunities. the 1990s I.T. was a further boon.

ultimately, the best way to financial independence, is to be an entrepreneur. start your own business. learn how to run a business. communities like chettiars, nadars, the gujarati patels, and even a vast section of muslims, do not simply care about reservations.

there may be superficial political agitations among the patels, but i think, for most of them, starting a dhookan is more important, than earning a degree, as a path to wealth and prosperity.

today, there is probably a need to re visit the concept of reservations. but any such suggestions coming from us, is suspect. let the current beneficiaries work it out. meanwhile, wherever we can, let us help anyone in our community, on a one on one basis, or as a group effort, to uplift their opportunities.
hi

in this case...i like PARSIS.....but we tambram have some social stigma abt DHOOKANDHARI...we learned from childhood....

அஞ்சு காசானாலும் அரசாங்க காசு....these mind set has to go...i know one story...a nadar boy came from tuthukudi

at the age of eight left hometown and started working in nadar store in chennai as எடுபிடி in a மளிகை கடை ..later after a few

years...he owned many stores with many branches...for them its proud for them...but our nature of working as steno/clerk

better utilised by the british and later govt jobs....we feel more comfort/permanent in nature....we are not RISK TAKERS...

another problem with marriage market....in 60s...70s....even in 80s ...govt/bank job prefered grooms.....all other private

service grooms are USELESS....ONLY IT FIELD CHANGED THIS ATTITUDE....thanks to IT BASED JOBS....
 
TBs always, without any astounding protest learn to swim across the tide of evolutionary changes and survive by proving their fitness.
 

kunjuppu

Active member
hi

in this case...i like PARSIS.....but we tambram have some social stigma abt DHOOKANDHARI...we learned from childhood....

அஞ்சு காசானாலும் அரசாங்க காசு....these mind set has to go...i know one story...a nadar boy came from tuthukudi

at the age of eight left hometown and started working in nadar store in chennai as எடுபிடி in a மளிகை கடை ..later after a few

years...he owned many stores with many branches...for them its proud for them...but our nature of working as steno/clerk

better utilised by the british and later govt jobs....we feel more comfort/permanent in nature....we are not RISK TAKERS...

another problem with marriage market....in 60s...70s....even in 80s ...govt/bank job prefered grooms.....all other private

service grooms are USELESS....ONLY IT FIELD CHANGED THIS ATTITUDE....thanks to IT BASED JOBS....

tbs,

government jobs never figured in my immediate family. and a bit extended one too. we are from palghat. dad had a small business. my chithappa was an auditor.

my maternal grandfather was a lawyer. all of dad's brothers, cousins, worked in bombay, delhi, north india in the private sector for marwadis, gujaratis and government owned industries.

which is one reason, that personally, i can never relate to folks being so bent upon government jobs. to date, we had one relative, my dad's cousin who was an ics officer. and another a secretary of a department in delhi. otherwise no government servants in my known family. this during 1950s thru 1980s which were the prime time for these jobs, i guess.

nowadays, i dont even know of anyone in india who wants a government job. except the rural first time graduates. and that too hearsay.
 

tbs

0
tbs,

government jobs never figured in my immediate family. and a bit extended one too. we are from palghat. dad had a small business. my chithappa was an auditor.

my maternal grandfather was a lawyer. all of dad's brothers, cousins, worked in bombay, delhi, north india in the private sector for marwadis, gujaratis and government owned industries.

which is one reason, that personally, i can never relate to folks being so bent upon government jobs. to date, we had one relative, my dad's cousin who was an ics officer. and another a secretary of a department in delhi. otherwise no government servants in my known family. this during 1950s thru 1980s which were the prime time for these jobs, i guess.

nowadays, i dont even know of anyone in india who wants a government job. except the rural first time graduates. and that too hearsay.
hi sir,

business is risk taking.....as socialistic/communist countries more RED TAPE in business....as a capitalistic are more private

company opportunities....they flourish well.....in USA.....we can easily file a bankruptsy......but not possible in a socialistic

country.....even though govt pays less salary than private....life less risk in private....i did a research on govt/private

company abt plus and minus in my MBA research paper. long time ago.....there are many private companies managed by

TBs in tamil nadu.....i know one personal story of 80s in tamil nadu....i had a family friend ..he was just graduated from famous

engg college in tamil nadu..he is middle class tambram family....he used to stay in my home with me in chennai...i was teacher

in mylapore...after college ...he joined immediately in TB engg firm in chennai as trainee graduate engg...he got the job

by recommendation as tambram boy....his father was not happy in private company..he just applied TN PWD as assistant

engineer....even though he was less paid in govt....his promotions was not assured in govt...becoz of his caste....

he was very bright student and got first class in engg....he would have very top position in pvt company quickly.....

his parents prefered govt job for his marriage and status in the society.....i think he got first promotion after twenty

yrs in govt job....due to reservation...other got promotion easily than him....still he was happy.....becoz....

அஞ்சு காசானாலும் அரசாங்க காசு.....
 
My father worked in private firms all along...But most people in my extended family during 50's-80's took up only Government jobs 90% central government or PSU...5% State Government and another 5% private...Post liberalization it has turned turtle...90% in private sector...Doing business however is just 1-2%...It is not our forte!
 

CHANDRU1849

Active member
Business requires patience, imagination, hard work etc., which is difficult for a TB to follow. Those who are ready to face the challenge succeed in their attempt.

We generally prefer 'NOGAMAL NOMBU KONDADUVATHU'.
 

kunjuppu

Active member
vgane

i dont know much about if doing business is not our 'forte'.

business is a learned skill, i think. entrepreneurship..finding a field, making a business case, client service (most important), keeping up one's word and above all honesty. all these are common traits. and remember to treat your employees generously.

in most private companies we have to work hard. and the company takes the cream of the benefit and pays us wages which are worth much less than what we put in. why not work for ourselves and get 100% reward for our own efforts.
 
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