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Mormons carried out proxy baptism on Mahatma Gandhi

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Naina_Marbus

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Predatory proselytization

Mahatma Gandhi was posthumously baptized by proxy by a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, according to a report in The Huffington Post.

Helen Radkey, a former Mormon who has until now has focused on researching incidents of proxy baptisms being proposed for or performed on dead Jews, discovered the Gandhi records on February 16 in a genealogical database restricted to Mormons. She was prompted to search for his name after seeing a statement by Rajan Zed of Nevada who expressed concern the practice might be performed in the name of many Hindus.

A screen shot of the database page sent to HuffPost by Radkey shows a proxy baptism for Gandhi was completed in a Salt LakeCity Temple on March27, 1996.

The church has explained that it conducts thepractice of proxy baptisms "because all who have lived on the earth havenot had the opportunity to be baptized by proper authority during life on earth.”

At this rate, they can convert all past Hindu saints into Mormons, by a trick of the hat!! Would it be Thiruvalluvar the next?

More details in Huffington Post
 
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renuka

Well-known member


At this rate, they can convert all past Hindu saints into Mormons, by a trick of the hat!! Would it be Thiruvalluvar the next?

More details in Huffington Post


I guess Gandhi Ji knew what was coming in the future and thats why he sang

"Ishwar Allah Tere Naam Sab Ko San Mathi Dey Bhagawan"


No one can convert anyone Posthumously cos most important facts for conversion is:

1)Consent of the individual either voluntarily or by force
2)Person to be converted need to be present physically.


Since in the case of a deceased individual..the above 2 criteria can not be met so technically their attempt of posthumous conversion is futile and a waste of time.
 
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Naina_Marbus

Well-known member
I guess Gandhi Ji knew what was coming in the future and thats why he sang

"Ishwar Allah Tere Naam Sab Ko San Mathi Dey Bhagawan"


No one can convert anyone Posthumously cos most important facts for conversion is:

1)Consent of the individual either voluntarily or by force
2)Person to be converted need to be present physically.


Since in the case of a deceased individual..the above 2 criteria can not be met so technically their attempt of posthumous conversion is futile and a waste of time.

Dear Renuka:

You have the right perspective. More than 90 people have viewed this post, but neither the folowers of Karl Marx nor the followers of Karm Marg have commented.

According to Mormon author Samuel Brown, proxy baptism enables Christ to "be brought to everyone in the afterlife." Funny these guys don't understand that such an idea could offend other religious groups who do not consider Jesus as essential to their salvation.
 

renuka

Well-known member
Dear Renuka:

You have the right perspective. More than 90 people have viewed this post, but neither the folowers of Karl Marx nor the followers of Karm Marg have commented.

According to Mormon author Samuel Brown, proxy baptism enables Christ to "be brought to everyone in the afterlife." Funny these guys don't understand that such an idea could offend other religious groups who do not consider Jesus as essential to their salvation.

Dear Naina,

These guys dont even realize they are actually degrading Jesus, I dont know why they dont feel that God/Divinity need some respect and not brought door to door when people might not even desire it.

I wont force anyone to be a Hindu cos I dont want anyone to reject or degrade Hinduism.
 
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Naina_Marbus

Well-known member
The Christian Englishman who believes in karma and reincarnation

Sir Mark Tully is a veteran BBC India correspondent. He can be seen walking in New Delhi’s Lodhi Gardens, with a cane in hand, dressed in white kurta pyjamas. He is the Englishman who has given his heart to his adoptive country.

He spent 46 years reporting from the sub-continent, and this long period of time has given him an Indian accent to certain words, and a Hindustani aspect to some gestures.

He still maintains his Christian faith, devoted to the Anglican Church. He was a theology student at Cambridge, and at Lincoln Theology College, where he once hoped to become a priest. He remains a regular worshipper at Cathedral Church of the Redemption in New Delhi.

Yet, at 76, Mark Tully is on a spiritual journey that few of his fellow worshippers would consider recognizably Christian: he has accepted the eastern religious ideas of karma and reincarnation.

There are different interpretations of karma and reincarnation , but Sir Mark has come to believe that he will be born again into a new life, the nature of which will be determined by how he has lived and behaved in this one.

He no longer accepts central Christian tenets of God’s forgiveness and redemption,or the physical resurrection of Christ. And he must reconcile somehow this departure with his refusal to give up his connection to the Anglican Church.

“Being in India, my Christianity has altered to such an extent from what an orthodox theologian would call Christianity. I don’t find the idea of karma and reincarnation incredible. In some ways I find it more applicable to the human situation than the Christian idea of heaven and the life hereafter,” he says.

Tully accepts his belief in karma cannot be reconciled so easily with christianity.

“If you have this concept of karma and of reincarnation, there’s a big problem, I admit, because there’s no redemption or forgiveness,” he says. “The fundamental thing I do believe is to believe in God. Many Christians would not approve but I believe there are many different ways to God, and one of the most important things is to recognise we have a sketchy knowledge of God. For me, one of the problems with Christianity is that it has spelled out everything in too explicit terms. If you find one of those terms difficult to believe, you can lose the whole thing.”

He is not, however, prepared to lose it all.

He first noted the possibility of karma or fate in his own life when he returned to India – he was born in Calcutta to British parents in 1935. He feels that, after drifting between jobs and callings for some years, he was fated to make his life and career in India.

“I thought to myself, actually, India is the place I should make myself. Afterall, I was born here, and on my mother’s side we were British in India as farback as my great-great-grandfather. As life went on, India kept coming back into my life. I see myself as meant to be here. There is a phrase in Hindi that says 'you have to find your karma in life’. India has turned out to be mine.’’

He has admiration for India’s religious pluralism. But he has always stressed his own journey would be “within the tradition of my church’’; ...“the doctrine of redemption.. it’s not the best way to encourage people to live a good life,by giving them the thought that in the end [they can be forgiven]. I can’tbelieve it is as simple as that,” he says.

So rather than redemption, he believes another life will be chosen for him by a loving God… To quote : “The way I look at it is this: karma is a possible explanation of something. I do believe in God and that death is not the end, and reincarnation is a possible explanation for what happens after death…”, and … “In my next life I might be born with few opportunities. But if you keep the concept of a loving God, this won’t be the end of the road, there’s a chance you might live the next life better than this one..."

"If you have had a deep experience of Christianity, at least, you never want to give it up, because the liturgy, the hymns, they matter a lot. The priests and what they taught you matter a lot, and there is the question of loyalty. One does one’s utmost not to chuck it out of the window,” he says.


Excerpted from an article in the The Telegraph, dated 3 Dec 2011.
 
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sarang

Well-known member
Even in TV discussions, mark tully acknowledges he is a christian, is vehemently against conversion, quite critical of the role played by the foreign funded ngos, and the injustice meted out to majority hindus in various ways and concludes with the request for indians to follow and live by their ancient dharma.
 
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