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Diabetes killing more than 2 lakh Indians every year

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prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
With the World Health Organisation (WHO) red-flagging deaths of more than 2,00,000 Indians every year from diabetes, Indian medical researchers have suggested a modified set of treatment protocols to treat millions of Indians, who are silently becoming diabetic patients.

According to the WHO, diabetes kills 2,20,000 Indians each year, and a majority of them — almost 125,000 — die at the productive age of 30-69 years.

India has nearly 6.3 crore cases of diabetes and the numbers are expected to rise to 10.1 crore by 2030, according to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR).

“For various reasons, algorithms developed and validated in developed nations may not be relevant or applicable to Indian patients. Any treatment decision in India should take into account not only these differences but also socio-economic and cultural factors, such as dietary practices,” said Anoop Misra, a former professor at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences.

Misra is one of the key members of the India diabetes management algorithm proposal group — a congregation of 40 senior doctors from government and private hospitals from all over the country — which proposed the new treatment protocols and guidelines.

“It has long been recognised that type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians differs significantly from that found in white Caucasians. There is a clear need for developing specific guidelines for the pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes in this population,” said Misra, who is currently the chairman of Fortis Center for Diabetes, Obesity, Metabolic Diseases, and Endocrinology in Delhi.

Indians have more fat in their liver and pancreas, which is bad for metabolism. The disease occurs 10 years earlier among Indians and afflict even non-obese people, he said.

The new algorithm clearly mentions when first, second and third line therapies have to be introduced and the medical options in each category.

In every case, therapeutic lifestyle changes — more physical exercises and dietary changes — have been encouraged to the maximum extent possible along with regular monitoring.

To design more effective and state-specific intervention strategies, ICMR initiated an exercise to study 1,24,000 people from 28 states, Delhi and two union territories to create state-wise profile of diabetes. Halfway through the project, the study has already come up with interesting trends.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/538437/diabetes-killing-more-2-lakh.html
 

vgane

Well-known member
Gold Member
Timely food in small proportions and daily 1 mile walk are the need of hour..Shocked to know that young girls in their 20's are also affected by the disease!
 

tbs

Well-known member
hi

especially for south india.....which is very common....due to rice food with more carbohydrates....in north...due to whole wheat

rotis.....which is very less....
 

yesmohan

Well-known member
I am not a doctor; but I understand that Diabetes in itself it not a decease. It is only a short fall in system. Many people, now a days, learnt to live long with diabetes by managing it in a good way.
If not managed properly, side effects of diabetes may lead to many problems including fatal ones.
 
Last edited:

renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
I am not a doctor; but I understand that Diabetes in itself it not a decease. It is only a short fall in system.

Technically every disease or illness is a system short fall of some kind or the other.

But in the real sense its better to consider it a disease so that its taken seriously.

Type 2 diabetes is preventable but Type 1 is not preventable.
 

mkrishna100

Well-known member
Indians have more fat in their liver and pancreas, which is bad for metabolism. The disease occurs 10 years earlier among Indians and afflict even non-obese people, he said.

There is a myth that only obsese people are affected by diabetes . Even very slim people can be affected .

Type 2 diabetes is preventable but Type 1 is not preventable.

True
 

tbs

Well-known member
hi

in many cases...it is hereditary too.......type 2 diabetes are mostly hereditary......
 

auh

New member
If it is hereditary, it requires one to readjust their lifestyle very early to slow or possibly halt the onset of the condition. I have had one of my family member eat raw pahakkai, and still got diabetes. None in the family had. Strange case.
 

renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
If it is hereditary, it requires one to readjust their lifestyle very early to slow or possibly halt the onset of the condition. I have had one of my family member eat raw pahakkai, and still got diabetes. None in the family had. Strange case.

It could have been due to a Viral infection or inflammation to the pancreas.

Those who get such infections can become diabetics.

Pakistani actor/Model Fawad Khan(Greek God!) became insulin dependent diabetic at the age of 18 after he met with an accident and developed a viral infection of the pancreas.

I have noted the celebrities with Diabetes some how look so normal and healthy and have fantastic bodies.

Eg Fawad Khan...and Hollywood actress Halle Berry.

Both are insulin dependent and watch their diet...exercise well and look very healthy and normal.

Most ordinary people who are insulin dependent usually look sickly and worn out...becos they are not disciplined enough unlike the celebrities who are totally disciplined.

Who would believe Fawad Khan and Halle Berry are insulin dependent?



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renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
For the average Indian..the body has poor muscle mass and a higher percentage of fat.

Being thin does not mean one has less fat...some people are underweight yet the body is over fat becos the muscle mass is low.

If you observe the Indian body...we would note that its prone to central fat deposition and skinny limbs.

Central fat distribution spells Metabolic Syndrome even in a normal weight person becos visceral fat increases and one becomes diabetic eventually.

Indian diet too is too high in carbohydrates..mostly eat rice with tubers..shooting up the glucose levels in the body which in turn favors fat deposition and over use of insulin.

Again in a matter of time one develops diabetes due to relative lack of insulin becos of high carb diet.

Therefore changes can be made.

Note..Yogurt/Milk too contains carbs in the form of lactose which is broken down into glucose and galactose.

So even a plate of Thayir Sadam will make one's blood sugar levels rocket if consumed in excess.

So its better to eat any vegetarian meal with protein like lentils and tofu to halt the glucose spike in body.

Also to combat a low muscle mass and higher fat content of an average Indian body....one needs to exercise lifting some amount of weights to build muscle.

So guys...a ripped body could prevent diabetes...gain muscle today..get 6 packs!LOL
 

yesmohan

Well-known member
My elder sister who is 91 now, became diabetic at the age of 50.
She has learnt to live with diabetes by taking tablets in time, controlling the diet on her own and doing her work (washing cloths on her own, helping her daughter in cooking, going to near by bank and temple by walking)

 

auh

New member
For the average Indian..the body has poor muscle mass and a higher percentage of fat.

Being thin does not mean one has less fat...some people are underweight yet the body is over fat becos the muscle mass is low.

If you observe the Indian body...we would note that its prone to central fat deposition and skinny limbs.

Central fat distribution spells Metabolic Syndrome even in a normal weight person becos visceral fat increases and one becomes diabetic eventually.

Indian diet too is too high in carbohydrates..mostly eat rice with tubers..shooting up the glucose levels in the body which in turn favors fat deposition and over use of insulin.

Again in a matter of time one develops diabetes due to relative lack of insulin becos of high carb diet.

Therefore changes can be made.

Note..Yogurt/Milk too contains carbs in the form of lactose which is broken down into glucose and galactose.

So even a plate of Thayir Sadam will make one's blood sugar levels rocket if consumed in excess.

So its better to eat any vegetarian meal with protein like lentils and tofu to halt the glucose spike in body.

Also to combat a low muscle mass and higher fat content of an average Indian body....one needs to exercise lifting some amount of weights to build muscle.

So guys...a ripped body could prevent diabetes...gain muscle today..get 6 packs!LOL

I think (and have experienced) that surya namaskar poses are good at toning the body and making it vibrant. 15 to 20 mins of correct postures with breathing could make a lot of difference to the body and mind.

Surya namaskar in the morning, and walking in the evening is a good way of ensuring health. Provided that we are modest with our other indulges.
 

a-TB

Well-known member
Eat veggies, eat less fat, eat at proper time, sleep well for 8 hours daily, exercise daily for 20 minutes, try to have active sex life - all can help prevent onset of diabeties .. I read somewhere
 
I am not a doctor; but I understand that Diabetes in itself it not a decease. It is only a short fall in system. Many people, now a days, learnt to live long with diabetes by managing it in a good way.
If not managed properly, side effects of diabetes may lead to many problems including fatal ones.

Perfect. My doctor often says that Diabetic patients are healthier than non-diabetic people AS LONG AS DIABETICS IS WELL MANAGED. I am diabetic for over two decades and I understand that it is a state of health - not a disease. Uncontrolled diabetics will kill, it is true because, it affects several organs in the body - eyes, kidney, heart etc.,
 

tbs

Well-known member
Eat veggies, eat less fat, eat at proper time, sleep well for 8 hours daily, exercise daily for 20 minutes, try to have active sex life - all can help prevent onset of diabeties .. I read somewhere
hi

i read everything except this.....i may be wrong....
 

tks

Well-known member
Diabetes incidence has quadrupled in the past 35 years

source:
http://www.newsweek.com/diabetes-global-prevalence-world-health-organization-444575

=====================================
The number of people with diabetes has quadrupled in the past three decades, with 422 million adults now living with the disease, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO).


In its first report on diabetes, the WHO says the hundreds of millions of people around the world who are living with diabetes are mainly in developing countries. The organization puts the surge in diabetes cases down to lack of physical exercise and obesity, which are compounded by unhealthy diets.


Nearly nine percent of the world’s population now has diabetes, compared to 108 million people (4.7 percent) in 1980. Diabetes prevalence has risen faster in low- and middle-income countries over the past decade than in high-income countries, although "prevalence is growing in all regions of the world," according to the report.


At 13.7 percent, the Eastern Mediterranean region, which encompasses the Middle East and some North African and Asian countries, has the highest regional prevalence of diabetes in the world. In 1980, diabetes prevalence in the region was just 5.9 percent. The Western Pacific region has the largest number of diabetes cases, with 131 million people afflicted in 2014.


“If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO director-general, said in a statement on Wednesday. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.”


In 2012, diabetes deaths numbered 1.5 million, while higher-than-optimal blood glucose led to an additional 2.2 million deaths. The report does not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but does say that the majority of people with the disease are affected by type 2, which is “largely the result of excess body weight” and insufficient physical activity. The health complications of diabetes include heart attack, blindness and stroke, while people with the disease are 10 to 20 times more likely to undergo lower limb amputation.


In the U.S., nine percent of adults have diabetes and 70 percent of people are overweight. More than one-third of American adults are obese, according to WHO. The economic impacts of diabetes include “substantial” costs to families, health systems and national economies “through direct medical cost and loss of work and wages,” the report says.


“Many cases of diabetes can be prevented, and measures exist to detect and manage the condition, improving the odds that people with diabetes live long and healthy lives,” Dr. Oleg Chestnov, the WHO’s assistant director-general for noncommunicable diseases and mental health, said in a statement. “But change greatly depends on governments doing more, including by implementing global commitments to address diabetes and other NCDs.”


The WHO report was published one day before World Health Day, which is being held on April 7.
 
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