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citizens different outlook....

drsundaram

Active member
Why are public differently perceiving when it comes to crimes by politicians
in fact the spirit should soar high for politicians as they are drectly dealing with everone's tax payers money; surprisingy we are reluctant and hesitant here : why?. why?
please read on Mr Jagannathan's

Bail As Exoneration: What Chidambaram Case Tells Us About Public Attitudes To High Crimes

by R Jagannathan, Swarajya, Dec 05, 2019

There is a huge reluctance to see any politician punished for his crimes.
We are happy to see people being humiliated, but not finally punished.

Soon after former finance minister P Chidambaram was released on bail after 100-plus-days of custodial interrogation in multiple cases, the Congress party tweeted #SatyamevaJayate. Earlier this year, when his son Karti Chidambaram was subjected to custodial interrogation in the INX Media case, he showed a clenched fist and exuded defiance as he was being shepherded from jail to court and back.

Karnataka Congress politician D K Shivakumar, accused of money laundering, was given a hero’s welcome in Bengaluru last October when he was released on bail after questioning.

A Raja, widely seen as the author of the 2G scam, lost no time in calling Vinod Rai, the former Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), a contract-killer who needed to be prosecuted for merely daring to put a value on the scale of the 2G scam losses after a special court exonerated him. His exoneration is being challenged in the higher courts.

There must be something warped about our politicians’ sense of right and wrong that any case launched against any one of them equals vendetta, bail equals exoneration, and temporary exoneration in lower court means the boot must now be on the other foot, where the accused now has the right to accuse everyone else, including constitutional authorities or his prosecutors, of mala fide intent.

The Gandhis, Sonia and Rahul, are out on bail for what – at first glance – appears to be an open-and-shut case of mala fide transfer of a valuable asset to their private trust for inadequate consideration (the National Herald case), but even the media is hesitant to question them on this. It is assumed that this must be political vendetta because of the long-term antagonism between the Bharatiya Janata Party and the Congress party, and especially the Gandhi family.

There is surely something wrong in the Indian public ethos where we are all happy to see someone’s name dragged in the mud with or without proof, but the minute they are hauled up for interrogation or sent to jail or even convicted, all is forgiven. The same people we thought of as crooks become heroes in the public eye. There is a huge reluctance to see any politician punished for his crimes. We are happy to see people being humiliated, but not finally punished.

This is the exact opposite of our attitudes towards other criminals, where a thief is beaten to pulp if he is caught, or an alleged rapist is sought to be paraded in public and thrashed to death for his as yet unproven crimes. In the brutal rape and murder of a 27-year-old Telangana vet, many members of Parliament, including Jaya Bachchan, wanted punishments ranging from a public lynching to castration of the accused.

Our attitudes towards politicians prefer public muck-raking over actual convictions, while in the case of crimes by ordinary individuals, we prefer public punishment even before a crime is proven. We want nothing more than media humiliation for our politicians, but we want punishments of the most violent kind for the rest.

Indians clearly need to ask themselves why this is so. Why are we willing to wound but afraid to strike when it comes to public personalities, but want to kill and maim ordinary citizens merely to give vent to our rage?
 

Raman74

Active member
Politics and Crime are intertwined. And to be a politician with criminal back ground is not an easy job.

Political parties select candidates with criminal background. Preference is given for politicians who has more cases of conviction to his credit, more cases pending trial and more cases are Under Investigation, etc etc

The unwritten rule to qualify as a leader in politics is criminal background.

Only dishonest politicians with criminal back ground are considered, preferred and given tickets for election as this is the minimum requisite qualification.

These politicians with money power, muzzle power get favourable verdict

They are elected by the mass... they have fans.... they have blind followers and some of them are Goondas and act as god father for more.

These politicians do have an Office in their area. He will have influence in most of the Government ,Offices. He may have lot of contacts. He will help to get College Admission, School admission, Gas Connection, etc.etc

In our area, there is a politician and everyday morning, one can see a serpentine queue of public standing before his house. Once he comes along with his Secretary/PA, one by one of public will be allowed to see their leader. The grievances of these public will be heard and attended to by a team of his lieutenants. These men will visit Government Offices concerned and shall trouble shoot the problem of the aggrieved. For example, if you lost a Ration card , they will help to get duplicate. If there is delay in getting Electricity connection, these team will get it done in no time. They are approached right from Passport port to obtain permission for construction of a cinema theater, Petrol Bunk, etc

It is their leader who comes to their aid whenever they are in trouble.

Now, it is time for them to exhibit their loyalty to their leader.

When it is time for reciprocation, they snatch the golden opportunity.

When he comes out of Tihar... or Parapana Agraharam or Puzhal,etc he would be deemed as a Hero/warrior and party men will welcome him with great joy followed by a grand celebration, distribution of sweets, dance, etc

Politician is a very toughest service/profession... but more lucrative.

It is also very tough to be an honest politician... honest politicians are not that much successful. Don't no why. Public also prefer only dishonest politicians..... Only in Movies honest politicians can be found successful. LOL
 
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Raman74

Active member
Why do Indians vote for 'criminal' politicians?


Why do India's political parties field candidates with criminal charges? Why do the voters favour them despite their tainted past?


Political scientist Milan Vaishnav has been studying links between crime and democracy in India for many years now. His upcoming book When Crime Pays offers some intriguing insights into what is a disturbing feature of India's electoral democracy.

………………….

Now, India's general elections are not exactly a cakewalk.

The Indian politicians facing criminal charges

Why do many India MPs have criminal records?

Politics and the barrel of the gun

Over time, they have become fiercely competitive: 464 parties were in the fray in 2014, up from 55 in the first election in 1952.

The rising cost of elections and a shadowy election financing system where parties and candidates under-report collections and expenses means that parties prefer "self-financing candidates who do not represent a drain on the finite party coffers but instead contribute 'rents' to the party". Many of these candidates have criminal records.

There are three million political positions in India's three-tier democracy; each election requires considerable resources.

Many parties are like personal fiefs run by dominant personalities and dynasts, and lacking inner-party democracy - conditions, which help "opportunistic candidates with deep pockets".

'Good proxy'

"Wealthy, self financing candidates are not only attractive to parties but they are also likely to be more electorally competitive. Contesting elections is an expensive proposition in most parts of the world, a candidate's wealth is a good proxy for his or her electoral vitality," says Dr Vaishnav, who is senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Political parties also nominate candidates with criminal backgrounds to stand for election because, simply put, they win.

During his research, Dr Vaishnav studied all candidates who stood in the last three general elections. He separated them into candidates with clean records and candidates with criminal records, and found that the latter had an 18% chance of winning their next election whereas the "clean" candidates had only a 6% chance.

'Biggest criminal'

Now why do Indians vote for criminal candidates? Is it because many of the voters are illiterate, ignorant, or simply, ill-informed?

Dr Vaishnav doesn't believe so.

Candidates with criminal records don't mask their reputation. Earlier this month, a candidate belonging to the ruling party in northern Uttar Pradesh state reportedly boasted to a party worker that he was the "biggest criminal". Increasing information through media and rising awareness hasn't led to a shrinking of tainted candidates.

Dr Vaishnav believes reasonably well-informed voters support criminal candidates in constituencies where social divisions driven by caste and/or religion are sharp and the government is failing to carry out its functions - delivering services, dispensing justice, or providing security - in an impartial manner.

"There is space here for a criminal candidate to present himself as a Robin Hood-like figure," says Dr Vaishnav.

Clearly, crime and politics will remain inextricably intertwined as long as India doesn't make its election financing system transparent, parties become more democratic and the state begins to deliver ample services and justice.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has suggested state funding of polls to help clean up campaign financing. Earlier this month, he said people had the right to know where the BJP got its funds from. Some 14% of the candidates his BJP party fielded in the last elections had faced serious charges. (More than 10% of the candidates recruited by the Congress faced charges). But no party is walking the talk yet.

Read more at:
 
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drsundaram

Active member
Why are public differently perceiving when it comes to crimes by politicians
in fact the spirit should soar high for politicians as they are drectly dealing with everone's tax payers money; surprisingy we are reluctant and hesitant here : why?. why?
please read on Mr Jagannathan's

Bail As Exoneration: What Chidambaram Case Tells Us About Public Attitudes To High Crimes

by R Jagannathan, Swarajya, Dec 05, 2019

There is a huge reluctance to see any politician punished for his crimes.
We are happy to see people being humiliated, but not finally punished.

Soon after former finance minister P Chidambaram was released on bail after 100-plus-days of custodial interrogation in multiple cases, the Congress party tweeted #SatyamevaJayate. Earlier this year, when his son Karti Chidambaram was subjected to custodial interrogation in the INX Media case, he showed a clenched fist and exuded defiance as he was being shepherded from jail to court and back.

Karnataka Congress politician D K Shivakumar, accused of money laundering, was given a hero’s welcome in Bengaluru last October when he was released on bail after questioning.

A Raja, widely seen as the author of the 2G scam, lost no time in calling Vinod Rai, the former Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), a contract-killer who needed to be prosecuted for merely daring to put a value on the scale of the 2G scam losses after a special court exonerated him. His exoneration is being challenged in the higher courts.

There must be something warped about our politicians’ sense of right and wrong that any case launched against any one of them equals vendetta, bail equals exoneration, and temporary exoneration in lower court means the boot must now be on the other foot, where the accused now has the right to accuse everyone else, including constitutional authorities or his prosecutors, of mala fide intent.

The Gandhis, Sonia and Rahul, are out on bail for what – at first glance – appears to be an open-and-shut case of mala fide transfer of a valuable asset to their private trust for inadequate consideration (the National Herald case), but even the media is hesitant to question them on this. It is assumed that this must be political vendetta because of the long-term antagonism between the Bharatiya Janata Party and the Congress party, and especially the Gandhi family.

There is surely something wrong in the Indian public ethos where we are all happy to see someone’s name dragged in the mud with or without proof, but the minute they are hauled up for interrogation or sent to jail or even convicted, all is forgiven. The same people we thought of as crooks become heroes in the public eye. There is a huge reluctance to see any politician punished for his crimes. We are happy to see people being humiliated, but not finally punished.

This is the exact opposite of our attitudes towards other criminals, where a thief is beaten to pulp if he is caught, or an alleged rapist is sought to be paraded in public and thrashed to death for his as yet unproven crimes. In the brutal rape and murder of a 27-year-old Telangana vet, many members of Parliament, including Jaya Bachchan, wanted punishments ranging from a public lynching to castration of the accused.

Our attitudes towards politicians prefer public muck-raking over actual convictions, while in the case of crimes by ordinary individuals, we prefer public punishment even before a crime is proven. We want nothing more than media humiliation for our politicians, but we want punishments of the most violent kind for the rest.

Indians clearly need to ask themselves why this is so. Why are we willing to wound but afraid to strike when it comes to public personalities, but want to kill and maim ordinary citizens merely to give vent to our rage?
In any advanced country, citizens know their rights and duties. Only in India and similar countries, we know only our rights but not our duties. We are sucking powerful people's feet hoping for crumbs and that makes them feel above law. If we are conscious that our nation's wealth is for us and we need to protect,, then these blokes will not celebrate coming out on parole as if they are acquitted of crime. They and their stooges do not realise they have come on parole only with conditions on theor head but they think they have come out clean. Idiots
 

Raman74

Active member
In any advanced country, citizens know their rights and duties. Only in India and similar countries, we know only our rights but not our duties. We are sucking powerful people's feet hoping for crumbs and that makes them feel above law. If we are conscious that our nation's wealth is for us and we need to protect,, then these blokes will not celebrate coming out on parole as if they are acquitted of crime. They and their stooges do not realise they have come on parole only with conditions on theor head but they think they have come out clean. Idiots
I agree sir

Most of the public does not know the difference between arrest on conviction, arrest and letting out on bail with conditions, etc

Look at the list of leaders who are on Bail now:

"Classic case of @INCIndia 'Celebrating Corruption'!! So finally Chidambaram too joins the long list of “OOBC(Out On Bail Club)” in the Congress ..He joins the coveted Club,some members of which are:1)Sonia Gandhi 2)Rahul Gandhi 3)Robert Vadra 4)Motilal Vohra 5)Bhupinder Hooda 6)Sashi Tharoor Etc Etc," BJP national spokesperson Sambit Patra said on Twitter.

Some one has remarked that "it is BJP- led government's 'vikas gadi' versus Congresss 'bail gadi'.

1575987194976.png

Senior Congress leader P Chidambaram being greeted by the party workers and supporters as he comes out after he was released from Tihar jail in New Delhi. (Image: PTI)

Source: https://www.news18.com/photogallery/india/inx-media-case-p-chidambaram-comes-out-of-jail-after-106-days-2278019-3.html
 

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