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Arent we brahmins supposed to be learned in sanskrit and vedas

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Arent we brahmins supposed to be learned in sanskrit and vedas.what is the use if we are not so.what is the difference between us and others.why cant a brahmin educate his child in sanskrit and vedas.is it because he is not aware of it.of course no.when we do not do so,we shall loose interest in our culture and be responsible for it getting spoilt.are there any forums(real) other than this ,or any communities where people can get together and organize events
 
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sirs - the difference between others and us is that we are compulsorily vegetarians, which others are not. sanskrit is not necessarily compulsory, but essential for bramins so that they can learn,understand all holy scriptures and pass on the knowledge to next generations
 
My opinion in this matter is slightly different than that of Suresh.

Hinduism in general and Brahminism in particular encourage plurality of thought as long as the lines of thinking are intellectually sound and amenable to debate, and that debate itself remains parliamentary.

Since knowledge is one of the corner pillars of intellect, I believe it helps if one has a first hand knowledge of what is written in the scriptures. As most of our scriptures were written in Sanskrit, some knowledge of Sanskrit does help in having a direct understanding of them.

For example, we have diverse philosophies to choose from, such as Sankhya, Yoga, Mimamsa, Nyaya, Vaiseshika and Vedanta (which is nearly Buddhist according to some), and even the Sunya Vaada of Charvaka. One can even have one's own line of philosophy if he /she is intellectually capable of propounding one.

If we instead blindly go by the interpretations given by others to these texts, sooner or later we might become like those Taliban in Madrassas whose Mulla taught them that it rains when Allah uses the loo!
 
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I is thus described that apart from writing commentaries and other things.on the basis of the varna system,brahmins are supposed to learn vedas and recite them daily,but due to the conditions that prevail and the way there has been changes happenings such things have been not able to conitnue,which is being encouraged by many spritual instituitions,we can get most of the necessary knowledge from the scriptures.these things need to be made compulsary by imparting such knowledge at the childwood itself.what else one is to do other than work(science and technology)an earn.
 
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Interpolation

Since oral traditions were widely used to pass down the ancient scriptures, it is quite possible that interpolations may have been introduced along the way. The rishis, while of above ordinary intelligence, certainly could not avoid this possibility since most material available in those days (including palm leaves) were highly perishable.

Now of course, things are quite different, and books can last a few centuries. So committing the Vedic literature to written form for posterity is great, but with increasing digitization, the danger of fragmentation and interpolation is increasing. There is some suspicion that the tensions between Rishi Vaishampayana and King Janamejaya could have led to the interpolation of the Parasurama story.

To avoid Brahmanas becoming the equivalent of the Mullahs and dooming themselves to irrelevance, it is definitely important to preserve the original Sanskrit stanzas, which provide adequate context in which any interpretations or commentaries would be made. This should allow later generations of Hindus to still relate to, and leverage the wisdom of the highly intelligent rishis on the personal and spiritual nature of life, while discarding any irrelevant or anachronistic ritualistic practices.

Given the highly politicized nature of the Indian establishment today, I am not sure what can be done to preserve our heritage in dispassionate hands, without all kinds of lowlifes like the crass politicians getting involved. Most of us in secular professions have very little time to devote to continuing the oral traditions, even though some of us may know how to read/write/speak Sanskrit. I am not thinking 50-100 years into the future, but more like 2000-3000 years into the future. As long as we are humans, the same personal and spiritual issues may confront future generations also, regardless of technological advances. It is quite possible that due to climatic or societal changes, Brahmanas as a group may no longer be identifiable by that time, and their forefathers' history should not be lost like some kind of Atlantis. Brahmanas and Hindus need to think on a grander scale about what should be done in this regard.

My opinion in this matter is slightly different than that of Suresh.

Hinduism in general and Brahminism in particular encourage plurality of thought as long as the lines of thinking are intellectually sound and amenable to debate, and that debate itself remains parliamentary.

Since knowledge is one of the corner pillars of intellect, I believe it helps if one has a first hand knowledge of what is written in the scriptures. As most of our scriptures were written in Sanskrit, some knowledge of Sanskrit does help in having a direct understanding of them.

For example, we have diverse philosophies to choose from, such as Sankhya, Yoga, Mimamsa, Nyaya, Vaiseshika and Vedanta (which is nearly Buddhist according to some), and even the Sunya Vaada of Charvaka. One can even have one's own line of philosophy if he /she is intellectually capable of propounding one.

If we instead blindly go by the interpretations given by others to these texts, sooner or later we might become like those Taliban in Madrassas whose Mulla taught them that it rains when Allah uses the loo!
 
Intellectual classes

The intellectual classes in any society, by necessity have had to have a broader perspective than others. One can actually witness this evolution from the Rig Veda, where a few intelligent rishis hypothesized on the origins of the universe and man, to the nuanced questioning of the nature of society, purpose and duties of man, and debates on the Vedic aphorisms in the Upanishads. The Taittiriya Upanishad is a great example, probably written around the time of Buddha.

There is a wider principle emphasized in the Upanishad, which was not present in the Rig Veda, an empathy with all life. This has clearly developed as the rishis traveled more, had more time to reflect on society, and also changing circumstances. One of which may have been a greater availability of food from agriculture instead of meat. The principle of vegetarianism would be a subset of the broader principle of ahimsa, compassion towards all life and not causing any violence towards them leading to pain or suffering. I feel if we are able to look beyond why some practices are advocated, Brahmanas will not end up like the Mullahs.

sirs - the difference between others and us is that we are compulsorily vegetarians, which others are not. sanskrit is not necessarily compulsory, but essential for bramins so that they can learn,understand all holy scriptures and pass on the knowledge to next generations
 
Time...

Speaking of which, I am increasingly finding that time is now in shorter supply than money! It is ironic that rishis in 2000BC had more free time to reflect on the universe and create intellectual property, than us "well-off" Brahmanas nowadays.

Anyway, I hope when the trust is formed, some of the money collected can be used to contribute to a Hindu foundation or Sanskrit College which can help preserve this knowledge for generations to come. Will try to check in once a week or two. Later.....

Most of us in secular professions have very little time to devote to continuing the oral traditions, even though some of us may know how to read/write/speak Sanskrit.
 
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