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9 Yardz - Let's go the Madisar Style

Anjali Anand

New member
Madisar - an epitome of our Brahmin culture and tradition. A saree style that is mostly relegated to muhurtams and the elders in the families. In our story today, we present you a young entrepreneur striving to revive this iconic style by fusing designs and trendiness that appeals to the current generation.

Reviving the lost glory of handloom weaving and bringing back the trend of 9-yard sarees is now the mission of his life. V. Krishnamoorthy, a Chartered Accountant by academics, has found his passion in the handloom industry - a symbol of Indian culture and heritage.

"It all started two years ago when we started shopping for my cousin's wedding. We went to a popular silk shop and selected a few sarees. We could see the prices double the time from what we get from the weavers directly — 100 % profit margin for the sellers. Then we went on to handpick the sarees directly from the handlooms of Kanjivaram and other parts of Tamil Nadu. I realized that women in my family were not just knowledgeable about the fabric and the make, but also on the intricacies of the design and color. Since days of our great- grandfathers, we had the custom and tradition of buying sarees directly from the weavers. We had the privilege to order our own colour choices and designs. When my cousin's wedding happened, we got connected to our weavers again. Then the idea of starting 9 Yardz seeded in.", says Krishnamoorthy, Director of Hrudyaa AdConSer Pvt. Ltd., a business consulting company that has been in the industry for nearly 5+ years.


krishnamoorthy-jpg.7057 9 Yardz - Let's go the Madisar Style


9-yard saree is famously called onbathu gajam pudavai or madisar. Worn in a typical fashion by Brahmin women for all important events, rituals, and ceremonies, this tradition has been upheld for many centuries dating back to ancient India nearing 2nd Century BC. Though silk is the most preferred fabric for madisar, 9 Yardz could be the only place that exhibits so many varieties in silk and cotton.

9-yards-sungudi-cotton-jpg.7058 9 Yardz - Let's go the Madisar Style

Amidst Krishnamoorthy's hectic professional practice, 9 Yardz is his only stress buster. Official travels that he often makes across the length and breadth of the country have helped him to connect with authentic weavers of the nation. Just two years in the market, Krishnamoorthy along with his business partner and aunt, Mrs. Krishna Sankar has gained in-depth knowledge about the history of weaving and handloom sector. He accredits his father for instilling the habit of learning in detail on whatever he does. He is happy that his mother has passed on the genes to love History as a subject from childhood. Mrs. Krishna Sankar has gained repute for her keen eye towards colours, design and fabric and is in charge of handpicking the designs according to the current trends and tastes of the customer.

9 Yardz houses sarees from 70 weavers across the country. Krishnamoorthy himself goes in person and handpicks every saree of the lot. There are no middlemen in their business. Be it Madurai Sungudi, Odisha Ikat, Lucknow Chinkankari or Andhra Kalamkari; he assures the authenticity of every piece that he sells. You even get the latest banana fiber sarees that is catching up the trend. They are made out of pseudostem of the banana plant. Though wholesale is not his cup of tea, he accepts bulk orders for weddings and other occasions. Prices are at least 20 to 30 % lesser than what you get in the shops of big brands. In spite of low-profit-margin, he is doing this only to support the livelihood of traditional handloom weavers and bringing it directly to his customers. He strives to keep the art alive. He is even working on releasing a documentary film capturing the lives of those weavers.


kanchi-kuppadam-jpg.7059 9 Yardz - Let's go the Madisar Style


Now that saree has become an occasional wear for the modern generation; we were keen to know what was his ray of hope to make profits in 9 yards. He laughed heartily before posing the question to us. "You say it’s occasional wear. But how many sarees do you have in your wardrobe?". He is quite confident about women and their love for sarees. "When Jhansi Rani was comfortable wearing a Nauvari to war, why would you think it is difficult to wear to an 8 to 5 Job?" asks Krishnamoorthy. He firmly believes that this Indian Identity will always thrive. What he worries is only the diminishing knowledge of the public about the weave, fabric, art and the ability to appreciate the workmanship involved in making each saree.

paithini-saree-jpg.7060 9 Yardz - Let's go the Madisar Style


He also talks about Madisar and its benefits at length. He says, "Not just in the Tamil Brahmin community, but wearing a Madisar has been a culture in many other Indian Communities too.
They are known by different names like Nauvari, Madisar, Koshavam, Kasta, Kachcha, Sakachcha, Lugada.
The actual length of a traditional saree is 9 yards. Only much later the 6 yards were introduced. Back then Asian women did not have the concept of undergarments. This madisar style was perfect to suit a women's body and posture. Even Srilankan women tied a 9-yard saree but in a slightly different manner. "

He continues to talk about how the draping style adds significance to women's health. "Our ancestors hardly had any miscarriage or infertility problems. But now we all know the raising counts of such cases. And also they put a tight knot around the hip which firmly presses their hip and backbone like an orthopedic hip belt protecting their back. They wear it especially during the vrathams because it helps them from feeling hungry or thirsty. We have science behind whatever was said and practiced."

Madisar cushions a woman's uterus and acts as a shock absorber.

9 Yardz is spreading its name and fame only through word of mouth. There are around 7000 followers gathered organically on their Facebook page. Though started with the aim of running the business only online, very soon Krishnamoorthy wanted to open a place as a touch and feel center for their customers. A simple setup at T. Nagar South Boag Road promises us a varied collection. Saree that is handed over in a cloth bag with a beautiful hand-painted logo on it will not just be an addition to your wardrobe but also a memory for a lifetime.

banana-fibre-saree-jpg.7061 9 Yardz - Let's go the Madisar Style


9 Yardz Handloom Sarees

Contact:
+91 9952412838
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/9yardz
Website: www.9yardz.co.in
Address: 17/9, Block D, Adwave Towers, South Boag Rd, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

Written by: Chikki for Tamil Brahmins
 
Last edited:

prasad1

Well-known member


Yes, it is traditional and expensive, where is the market for it?
Yes, bridal gowns are sold in the west, so there might be a market for Madisar sarees.
It is an art form, but is it popular and practical?
 

NRV

Member
I am not familiar with variants in madisar, but there are two types of wearing I think Iyer style and Iyengar style. There also goes a popular saying -Vadama kattu and Vathima settu, the first one meaning madisar wearing I think. Only those who wear it can throw more light
 

tbs

Well-known member
hi

i like madisar....i feel one of the best sexy dress with tradition...many may not like the word SEXY....NICE

LOOK AND ELEGANT...
 

RamaArun

Member
Madisar - an epitome of our Brahmin culture and tradition. A saree style that is mostly relegated to muhurtams and the elders in the families. In our story today, we present you a young entrepreneur striving to revive this iconic style by fusing designs and trendiness that appeals to the current generation.

Reviving the lost glory of handloom weaving and bringing back the trend of 9-yard sarees is now the mission of his life. V. Krishnamoorthy, a Chartered Accountant by academics, has found his passion in the handloom industry - a symbol of Indian culture and heritage.

"It all started two years ago when we started shopping for my cousin's wedding. We went to a popular silk shop and selected a few sarees. We could see the prices double the time from what we get from the weavers directly — 100 % profit margin for the sellers. Then we went on to handpick the sarees directly from the handlooms of Kanjivaram and other parts of Tamil Nadu. I realized that women in my family were not just knowledgeable about the fabric and the make, but also on the intricacies of the design and color. Since days of our great- grandfathers, we had the custom and tradition of buying sarees directly from the weavers. We had the privilege to order our own colour choices and designs. When my cousin's wedding happened, we got connected to our weavers again. Then the idea of starting 9 Yardz seeded in.", says Krishnamoorthy, Director of Hrudyaa AdConSer Pvt. Ltd., a business consulting company that has been in the industry for nearly 5+ years.




9-yard saree is famously called onbathu gajam pudavai or madisar. Worn in a typical fashion by Brahmin women for all important events, rituals, and ceremonies, this tradition has been upheld for many centuries dating back to ancient India nearing 2nd Century BC. Though silk is the most preferred fabric for madisar, 9 Yardz could be the only place that exhibits so many varieties in silk and cotton.


Amidst Krishnamoorthy's hectic professional practice, 9 Yardz is his only stress buster. Official travels that he often makes across the length and breadth of the country have helped him to connect with authentic weavers of the nation. Just two years in the market, Krishnamoorthy along with his business partner and aunt, Mrs. Krishna Sankar has gained in-depth knowledge about the history of weaving and handloom sector. He accredits his father for instilling the habit of learning in detail on whatever he does. He is happy that his mother has passed on the genes to love History as a subject from childhood. Mrs. Krishna Sankar has gained repute for her keen eye towards colours, design and fabric and is in charge of handpicking the designs according to the current trends and tastes of the customer.

9 Yardz houses sarees from 70 weavers across the country. Krishnamoorthy himself goes in person and handpicks every saree of the lot. There are no middlemen in their business. Be it Madurai Sungudi, Odisha Ikat, Lucknow Chinkankari or Andhra Kalamkari; he assures the authenticity of every piece that he sells. You even get the latest banana fiber sarees that is catching up the trend. They are made out of pseudostem of the banana plant. Though wholesale is not his cup of tea, he accepts bulk orders for weddings and other occasions. Prices are at least 20 to 30 % lesser than what you get in the shops of big brands. In spite of low-profit-margin, he is doing this only to support the livelihood of traditional handloom weavers and bringing it directly to his customers. He strives to keep the art alive. He is even working on releasing a documentary film capturing the lives of those weavers.


Now that saree has become an occasional wear for the modern generation; we were keen to know what was his ray of hope to make profits in 9 yards. He laughed heartily before posing the question to us. "You say it’s occasional wear. But how many sarees do you have in your wardrobe?". He is quite confident about women and their love for sarees. "When Jhansi Rani was comfortable wearing a Nauvari to war, why would you think it is difficult to wear to an 8 to 5 Job?" asks Krishnamoorthy. He firmly believes that this Indian Identity will always thrive. What he worries is only the diminishing knowledge of the public about the weave, fabric, art and the ability to appreciate the workmanship involved in making each saree.



He also talks about Madisar and its benefits at length. He says, "Not just in the Tamil Brahmin community, but wearing a Madisar has been a culture in many other Indian Communities too. The actual length of a traditional saree is 9 yards. Only much later the 6 yards were introduced. Back then Asian women did not have the concept of undergarments. This madisar style was perfect to suit a women's body and posture. Even Srilankan women tied a 9-yard saree but in a slightly different manner. "

He continues to talk about how the draping style adds significance to women's health. "Our ancestors hardly had any miscarriage or infertility problems. But now we all know the raising counts of such cases. And also they put a tight knot around the hip which firmly presses their hip and backbone like an orthopedic hip belt protecting their back. They wear it especially during the vrathams because it helps them from feeling hungry or thirsty. We have science behind whatever was said and practiced."




9 Yardz is spreading its name and fame only through word of mouth. There are around 7000 followers gathered organically on their Facebook page. Though started with the aim of running the business only online, very soon Krishnamoorthy wanted to open a place as a touch and feel center for their customers. A simple setup at T. Nagar South Boag Road promises us a varied collection. Saree that is handed over in a cloth bag with a beautiful hand-painted logo on it will not just be an addition to your wardrobe but also a memory for a lifetime.

9 Yardz Handloom Sarees

Contact:
+91 9952412838
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/9yardz
Website: www.9yardz.co.in
Address: 17/9, Block D, Adwave Towers, South Boag Rd, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

Written by: Chikki for Tamil Brahmins
Always wanted to reach out to weavers.Thanks for sharing 🙏🏻
 

nag1953

Member
It is time that we revert to our old culture of wearing Dhotis/Veshtis which are really very suitable to the Indian weather conditions. There is no Westerner ruling our country now and they will not dictate. We can stop aping the west for once. This culture will revive and improve the lives of many handloom weavers.
Let us wear only handlooms and avoid mill woven fabrics this will contribute to increase in employment and ensure continuation of the old skills of the weavers.
 

NRV

Member
I have been wearing dhotis for 50 years in India and abroad, i.e the so called rettai veshti since I joined college at home or not when going out formally. Of course offices and colleges do not permit wearing of dhotis particularly engineering institutions, due to safety reasons as loose clothing can get entangled in rotating machines. However, I prefer to wear veshti only as a preferred dress as it is representative of Hindu, particularly Tamil Brahmin, more specifically, Tanjore Jilla culture. Even going out for dinner etc, I prefer veshti though full length trousers are safer particularly when you go in a two wheeler, for long trips.
But you will find people wearing dhotis only in Kerala and Mysore and politicians in Tamil Nadu. Particularly from Dravidian parties, their symbol is dhoti-clad. But politicians will avoid cotton and wear mostly synthetic i.e polyester blended ones.
The best material is a 60 or 40 count pure cotton for general wear and 100 count with Jari, i.e golden thread, when you need elegance. I normally buy only from loom directly either in Palakkad or sometimes in Rajapalayam where there used to be handloom weavers, but sadly most of them are closing down due to popularity of mill made dhotis which are harmful to environment. In Arab countries, it is compulsory for all men to wear cotton full length robe, which protects the body from sunlight heat and radiation in deserts, when they go out.
In fact as a Hindu, we are supposed to wear a new dhoti for functions but not bleached ones with chemicals. I am very particular about it and most of the mill fabrics are bleached and carry lot of chemicals. Plus an unbleached clothe can be used for home cooking purpose for filtering, first aid band aid etc after a wash in plain water. It is environmentally friendly and you can use it up to the last thread.
My sons who are school going, will never touch dhotis, except for doing poojas as they love jeans. No amount of persuasion helps. Of course I have to wear trousers for all professional work and I also wear shorts for doing work in gardening, repair work etc. But dhoti is the king of all dress for brahmin men.

A typical set is the bottom piece and top angavastharam which will pair as a towel and easy to wear and maintain and carries no tailoring costs.
Youngsters can also try Veshti with colourful cotton half sleeve shirts, White Jibba i.e churidar, particularly the chikan variety of Lucknow or plain raw silk ones which you get in Calcutta a Benagali favourite. China can never imitate this attire of ours as they cannot wear it in their climate.
 

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