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Interesting observation about punal

harigiyer

Member
I noticed that whenever I bend to do something that involves physical labor, like cleaning shower, bathroom etc, the punal blocks you from doing that, becomes a sort of hindrance, the only way would be to remove that temporarily, which I do not. There might be an job element to this theory. I read in one of the pocket articles where there was a discussion of 15th-18th century French royalty where long pointed shoes was the norm for nobility to wear preventing them to do any kind of physical work. Is there a linkage? just curious?
 

renuka

Well-known member
What about bending down to clean our feet when we bathe?
What about bending forward during yoga or a headstand during yoga?

The Yagnopavit should not hinder one from bending forward to do anything becos the flexibility of the spinal column is very stressed upon in the life of a Hindu.

I guess you just have to secure it tightly when you bend forward and wear a shirt when you are cleaning anything.

Back in ancient days Kings too wore Yagnopavit and during fighting and it didnt hinder them from yielding their weapons becos it was secured well by their armors.

So here same rules apply..get an "armor" as in a shirt when you want to do some cleaning that requires bending forward.
 

tbs

Well-known member
What about bending down to clean our feet when we bathe?
What about bending forward during yoga or a headstand during yoga?

The Yagnopavit should not hinder one from bending forward to do anything becos the flexibility of the spinal column is very stressed upon in the life of a Hindu.

I guess you just have to secure it tightly when you bend forward and wear a shirt when you are cleaning anything.

Back in ancient days Kings too wore Yagnopavit and during fighting and it didnt hinder them from yielding their weapons becos it was secured well by their armors.

So here same rules apply..get an "armor" as in a shirt when you want to do some cleaning that requires bending forward.
hi doctor,

what a reply..... you should have born as brahmin male in your poorva janma?....LOL
 

renuka

Well-known member
hi doctor,

what a reply..... you should have born as brahmin male in your poorva janma?....LOL

Ha ha ha .
Its just logic.
Human body parts of both genders also hang forward when a human bends..so its all about keeping them well secured in their respective garments.
 

prasad1

Well-known member
I noticed that whenever I bend to do something that involves physical labor, like cleaning shower, bathroom etc, the punal blocks you from doing that, becomes a sort of hindrance, the only way would be to remove that temporarily, which I do not. There might be an job element to this theory. I read in one of the pocket articles where there was a discussion of 15th-18th century French royalty where long pointed shoes was the norm for nobility to wear preventing them to do any kind of physical work. Is there a linkage? just curious?

I take exception to the post. Long pointy shoes were worn in India long before their counterparts "invented: it in Europe.

The jutti is a type of footwear common in North India and neighboring regions. They are traditionally made up of leather and with extensive embroidery, in real gold and silver thread as inspired by Indian royalty over 400 years ago. Prior to that, Rajputs of the northwest used to wear leather juttis. Now with changing times different juti with rubber soles are made available. Besides Punjabi jutti, there are various local styles as well. Today Amritsar and Patiala ("tilla jutti") are important trade centers for handcrafted juttis, from where they are exported all over the world to Punjabi diaspora. Closely related to mojaris. Juttis have evolved into several localized design variations, even depending upon the shoemaker. However by large, they have no left or right distinction, and over time take the shape of the foot. They usually have flat sole, and are similar in design for both women and men, except for men they have a sharp extended tip, nokh curved upwards like traditional mustaches, and are also called khussa, and some women’s juttis have no back part, near the ankle. Even with changing times juttis have remained part of ceremonial attire, especially at weddings, the unembellished juttis are used for everyday use for both men and women in most of Punjab mostly called Jalsa Jutti which is blackish in color.


 

Sudarsanam

New member
I noticed that whenever I bend to do something that involves physical labor, like cleaning shower, bathroom etc, the punal blocks you from doing that, becomes a sort of hindrance, the only way would be to remove that temporarily, which I do not. There might be an job element to this theory. I read in one of the pocket articles where there was a discussion of 15th-18th century French royalty where long pointed shoes was the norm for nobility to wear preventing them to do any kind of physical work. Is there a linkage? just curious?
Namaskaram

With due respect I wish to offer my comments. It is Very pleasing to know you give respect to poonal to the extent of wearing. It's is more precisely known as yegnopaveedam . Which is the prime most important for performance of yegna. Every aspect when given due respect is always adorned. Yegnopaveedam should never been removed. It needs to be replaced by a new yegnopaveedam in every 3 months. It needs to be changed if we happen to go to a masanam . The yegnopaveedam is paramam pavathram hence should be respected always. It is the highest honor for bhramana vaishya and kshatriya. As we all give due importance of pronouncing or spelling our name we should make no compromise. Poonal should be worne with left shoulder to right when performing nithya karma, Deva karma's viz. Sandhyavandanam daily Pooja yegna grahapravesam seemandham .etc. it should be worne on right shoulder to.left when performing apama karya like death rituals amavasya tharpanam etc. Poonal should be worn as mala when carrying a dead body to masanam. It should be worn like a mala putting on to your back after putting a loop so that it remains there without causing any hindrance when you are engaged in any work including comsumation. Poonal should be wound and hung on to your right ear and tied with a towel when you do soucham i.e urinate etc.
 

gunse64

Member
Namaskaram

With due respect I wish to offer my comments. It is Very pleasing to know you give respect to poonal to the extent of wearing. It's is more precisely known as yegnopaveedam . Which is the prime most important for performance of yegna. Every aspect when given due respect is always adorned. Yegnopaveedam should never been removed. It needs to be replaced by a new yegnopaveedam in every 3 months. It needs to be changed if we happen to go to a masanam . The yegnopaveedam is paramam pavathram hence should be respected always. It is the highest honor for bhramana vaishya and kshatriya. As we all give due importance of pronouncing or spelling our name we should make no compromise. Poonal should be worne with left shoulder to right when performing nithya karma, Deva karma's viz. Sandhyavandanam daily Pooja yegna grahapravesam seemandham .etc. it should be worne on right shoulder to.left when performing apama karya like death rituals amavasya tharpanam etc. Poonal should be worn as mala when carrying a dead body to masanam. It should be worn like a mala putting on to your back after putting a loop so that it remains there without causing any hindrance when you are engaged in any work including comsumation. Poonal should be wound and hung on to your right ear and tied with a towel when you do soucham i.e urinate etc.
With due respect I submit my understanding as below:
In every situation one should take decision based on his heart and knowledge (buddhi). Poonul might be a symbolic representation. It divides heart and buddhi and in general, (Right side) routine and important times it reminds every time before taking any decision apply these two separately and then conclude. When doing death rituals this sybolises union of heart and buddhi ( left side) where all our wishes on the loved ones and one should not think which is right or which is wrong. When is mala, both have no connection in emotional situations and just sail thru the situation.
 

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