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Indian food leads the climate change battle with its meatless diet

prasad1

Well-known member
The traditional Indian thali now seems to have pride of place on the global table. At least, that’s what recent research and trends, particularly in the West, indicate.

As virtuous veganism becomes a value in places like North America, the organic aisles of supermarkets are now cluttered with brands with names like Prana or Guru. Studies and policy in recent times is driving this hunger for change. For instance, a recent study published in the journal Lancet called for cutting consumption of meat and sugar by half by 2050. Its findings gave rise to headlines like, Lentils with a side of rice: The save-the-world diet?

As many pointed out, the humble daal-chawal has been a staple of Indian meals for centuries. Canada’s updated Food Guide for 2019 also considers the daal the real deal, as well as dahi, the yoghurt that has also accompanied countless repasts in India.

While turmeric emerged as a superfood during this millennium, even other constants such as ghee, derided for decades as unhealthy, has turned a favourite, available in flavours like Maple Chai or Himalayan Pink Salt, not to mention spreads like chocolate ghee.


 
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CHANDRU1849

Well-known member
Is there any scientific study about the effectiveness of Veg. Food compared to NV?

Are the quantum of protein and energy derived from veg. food same as that of NV?
 

prasad1

Well-known member
Is there any scientific study about the effectiveness of Veg. Food compared to NV?

Are the quantum of protein and energy derived from veg. food same as that of NV?

Dr. Michael Greger answers the question that vegans and vegetarians hear all the time. In his video below, he breaks down how much protein we need versus how much protein we eat.
Do Vegetarians Get Enough Protein?
  • The average recommended intake of protein is 42 grams a day.
  • Non-vegetarians eat way more than that (almost 80 grams), but so does everyone else.
  • Vegetarians and vegans actually average 70% more protein than they need every day (over 70 grams).
There is so much fuss over protein, even though the studies Dr. Greger cites in the video show that 97% of Americans eat enough protein.

 

naithru

Active member
Here are 5 major reasons why a vegetarian diet is healthier than a non-vegetarian diet. Take a look.
  1. A more balanced diet
  2. Lower risk of heart diseases
  3. Lower risk of weight gain
  4. Longevity
  5. Good for digestion
 
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CHANDRU1849

Well-known member
Can a strict vegetarian perform tough jobs involving physical strength? Is there any scientific study to substantiate it?
 

prasad1

Well-known member
Vegetarian diets have so many proven health benefits, but will ditching meat tank your training? Not at all, finds a new Arizona State study, one of the first to answer this question. If you do vegetarianism right, you can build just as much cardiorespiratory fitness and strength.

Researchers recruited 70 elite endurance athletes — 27 vegetarians and 43 omnivores — and tracked their food intake, including protein powders and other caloric supplements, for one week. Then they took the participants’ body measurements. Although the vegetarians weighed less than the omnivores, both groups had almost equal body-mass indexes and percentage of lean muscle mass.

Next, to assess the athletes’ cardiorespiratory fitness, they measured their VO2 max during treadmill runs. The vegetarian men proved just as fit as the meat-eating guys, while the vegetarian women actually had 13 percent greater VO2 max scores than their omnivore counterparts. And to the researchers’ surprise, strength, as measured by peak torque during leg extensions, was equal for all men and women.

“I expected cardiorespiratory fitness to be about the same since lots of endurance athletes say their performance has improved since going vegetarian,” says lead study author Heidi Lynch. “Now this study backs that. I was more surprised about strength, because people often think they need meat to get big and strong.”

Of course, the key nutrient that meat delivers is protein, essential to building muscle. But according to these findings, if you get enough protein from plant sources such as soy, quinoa, and nuts, you shouldn’t need meat to gain strength. “Both groups were consuming amounts of protein that fell within the range of what sports dietitians recommend,” Lynch says. “The vegetarians got 1.2 grams per every kilogram of body weight while the omnivores consumed 1.4 grams, so not much more. This shows you can still get adequate protein from a plant-based diet.”

The vegetarians consumed more total grams of carbohydrates than the meat eaters; carbs also made up a higher percentage of their total caloric intake. Both factors may benefit athletic performance, Lynch says, especially in distance running, cycling, triathlon, and other endurance sports. As seen with the vegetarian women in the study, who had higher VO2 max scores, the perks may stem from better fuel availability.

“Perhaps by having a higher carb intake, you have better glycogen storage, which could improve training and benefit VO2 max,” Lynch theorizes. She assumes the same would happen with men but it just wasn’t evident in this study because the guys had a wider range of body sizes.

Besides being sufficient for increasing fitness and strength, vegetarian diets have been linked to healthier hearts, less cancer, and longer lifespans. Plus, they’re way better for the planet. “A big reason why I’m investigating this is I’m so interested in the sustainability aspect of nutrition,” Lynch says. “Plants use less land and water resources and produce fewer greenhouse gases. I wanted to know whether an athlete can maintain athletic performance and strength when eating in a sustainable manner.” Looks like the answer is a resounding yes.
 
I think Non veg food is good as long as the animal is grown in hygene way. Today right from sea animals to land animals live in filthy atmosphere. So by any reasoning such non veg foods are bad to human health.
 

prasad1

Well-known member
I think Non veg food is good as long as the animal is grown in hygene way. Today right from sea animals to land animals live in filthy atmosphere. So by any reasoning such non veg foods are bad to human health.
As far as hygiene goes, it affects our vegetarian food too.
So all conditions being the same The vegetarian food might be better than Non-Vegetarian food for the climate.
 

Jaykay767

Well-known member
Keeping all reason aside, the most important is Karma !! By eating non veg, you are taking part of the bad karma from this process.

This is why our ancestors gave up non veg completely and turned to sattivic !!
 

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