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I shall buy a home in your city!

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prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
At 32, Gokul Rajendran, a Malayali by birth, brought up and schooled in Chennai, worked in Kerala’s Techno Park and is finally shifting to Bengaluru with his new wife. Quite an uprooting, you might think. Rajendran thinks differently. He’s excited about his new home near ITPL
Culturally close, neighbouring cities often invite migrant new buyers. The reason is simple. Language, culture, food habits are similar and therefore no ‘uprooting’ is completely true. Rajendran can speak Malayalam, Tamil and Kannada as fluently as English and therefore no amount of shifting caused any major setback to him. In contrary to this, final year MBA student, Parth Kedia who had a brief term internship in Chennai said “I couldn’t adjust to the climate or the food habits. Either the sambhar tasted too sour to be true or perhaps I have been used to a lot of North Indian sambhar,” chuckles Kedia.

You would have come across robust markets across India inviting buyers from their ‘cousin states’. Mayank Arora of Arora Properties says, “Take the example of Delhi. Most home buyers here are either from Punjab, Chandigarh, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh.”
“Some are here because of parents being early settlers in the city while some others have been here by way of education, family, work or marriage. Language also binds these cultures together and therefore Chandni Chowk is more Punjabi than Delhi,” adds Arora.
This may not be totally true either. Shaimak Vaidya who works with a government organization says, “I am from Maharashtra and cannot think of owning a home in Nagpur although there is a close geographical and cultural tie. I have lived in Andheri all my life and wouldn’t give up my lifestyle to settle in a smaller city.” However, he agrees that when it comes to migrating to big cities, with or without a cultural similarity, most people are pro.

That brings us to what Varun Salukar of Primer Properties says. “Whether buying a home or living in one, budget is always a consideration. Most cities have gone completely global, thoroughly cosmopolitan these days inviting even expats to rent a home. As long as your lifestyle is not scarred and you are getting a fat pay in another man’s land, we Indians do ‘uproot’ for the good.”

I shall buy a home in your city!
 

JR

Hare Krishna
I always found relocating fascinating! It takes out the boredom from living your life amidst the same surroundings for years and years... but as much as I say this and as much do I admire living in the country, I find it to be an equally repulsive thought to leave my comfy city life among bustling activity to move out to a quieter place...even if would mean a much larger square-footage and living space!

Just exclaiming loud!
 

Vaagmi

Well-known member
Relocating is painful no doubt. I have experienced this several times. It is traumatic in that you lose your friends in the neighborhood. The friendship built over years and nurtured carefully is just lost in a jiffy. Children are the most affected because we can take pains beyond a point philosophically which they can not do as they do not know philosophy at the young age. When I say friendship it is every acquaintance and includes the paper boy who greets you in the morning with the news papers delivered promptly without fail on time with a smile on his face, the street corner annachi who runs a maligai shop where you buy your urgent needs-like when your spouse asks you to run and get the mundiriparuppu so that she can complete her thirukkannamudhu because the children have finished what she had kept in the fridge, the servant maid who works extremely fast to complete her tasks(we call her the chittukkuruvi) without sacrificing efficiency because she has a long list of households to attend to, the paatti in the neighborhood who never misses her place in the temple come what may-whether it is raining cats and dogs or it is sunny, the children who keeps doing bowling practice by using your window panes as the stump repeatedly-I have yet to catch them redhanded etc., etc., Then we have the neighbor who engages you during your morning and evening walk in political discussions and the numerous neighborhood mamis who give you a recognising smile because they know that you are the husband of so and so who is a member of their Kotha Ghoshti in the temple etc., when you move you miss all these and have the daunting task to develop to new ones where you go. And children remain sad for months together trying to get over the trauma.

But left to me, I would prefer to settle down in a far away village agraharam with the long street house. Reasons? I will post it later.
 

shakuntala

New member
Relocation when young is o.k. They can adjust easily. But having stayed in one place for many years and then sudden relocation...it is always tough. Yes, we miss familiar surroundings, roads, people and the whole culture we miss. It is tough especially for senior citizens. I have seen many parents who cisit their children abroad pine to come back to their original places after a month or two. The roads may not be very clean, noisy, power cuts may be there.....but familiarity of the place compensates all these.
Syamala
 

mkrishna100

Well-known member
Relocating is painful no doubt
Very True especially for people who have developed a good relationship with the neighbours , service providers ,shop keepers , servants , the Local Temple in that area .
 

JR

Hare Krishna
Relocating is painful no doubt. I have experienced this several times. It is traumatic in that you lose your friends in the neighborhood. The friendship built over years and nurtured carefully is just lost in a jiffy. Children are the most affected because we can take pains beyond a point philosophically which they can not do as they do not know philosophy at the young age. When I say friendship it is every acquaintance and includes the paper boy who greets you in the morning with the news papers delivered promptly without fail on time with a smile on his face, the street corner annachi who runs a maligai shop where you buy your urgent needs-like when your spouse asks you to run and get the mundiriparuppu so that she can complete her thirukkannamudhu because the children have finished what she had kept in the fridge, the servant maid who works extremely fast to complete her tasks(we call her the chittukkuruvi) without sacrificing efficiency because she has a long list of households to attend to, the paatti in the neighborhood who never misses her place in the temple come what may-whether it is raining cats and dogs or it is sunny, the children who keeps doing bowling practice by using your window panes as the stump repeatedly-I have yet to catch them redhanded etc., etc., Then we have the neighbor who engages you during your morning and evening walk in political discussions and the numerous neighborhood mamis who give you a recognising smile because they know that you are the husband of so and so who is a member of their Kotha Ghoshti in the temple etc., when you move you miss all these and have the daunting task to develop to new ones where you go. And children remain sad for months together trying to get over the trauma.

But left to me, I would prefer to settle down in a far away village agraharam with the long street house. Reasons? I will post it later.

Vaagmi ji, did you even breathe once until your finished your above sentence? Seems to be the longest sentence ever...

(One similarity -- I was mentioning to JayKay ji once too -- I too would love to live in a village, by the riverside in some Sri Rama kshetra... what a neat life that would be, sigh!).
 
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Vaagmi

Well-known member
JRji,

I take liberty with grammar and syntax to quickly convey a thought and then forget it. I also take care to see that I do not go too far away from the line on a grazing expedition. Please bear with me. LOL.
 

tbs

Well-known member
hi

throughout my life....i never stayed more than 3 yrs in one place...in my army service...its the condition...even my kids many

reloctions than me...it has prox and cons...even in canada/USA....i moved many provinces and states.....we have 50 states

in USA....sometimes i think....KAALELE CHAKRAM....some ppl born to till the in one place....never moved in their life....
 
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