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Has India missed the electric vehicle revolution?

prasad1

Well-known member
The need for an electric vehicle (EV) revolution in India is far greater than, perhaps, in any other major economy of the world.
The levels of urban pollution and the contribution of oil to the current account deficit alone should force policy-makers to push for EV mobility.
While the technology is taking its course, an appropriate policy direction through government support and regulatory clarity can go a long way in quickening the pace of adoption of EVs in India.

The levels of urban pollution and the contribution of oil to the current account deficit alone should force policy-makers to push for EV mobility in India.
Signals received from the government in the past one year reflect a state of utter confusion.
It started with ambitious claims to achieve 100 per cent EV mobility by 2030, which after some disquiet got rationalised to 30 per cent.
Much time was lost in determining whether provision of charging facilities for EVs amounts to sale of electricity or provision of service under the Electricity Act ("Act").


The issue of subsidy to consumers purchasing EVs too has seen flip-flops, with consumers initially getting the subsidy under FAME (a central government scheme), which is now proposed to be made available only to cab aggregators.
At last, good sense prevailed and it was held to be a provision of service, thus dispensing with the requirements of licensing under the Act.
The issue of subsidy to consumers purchasing EVs too has seen flip-flops, with consumers initially getting the subsidy under FAME (a central government scheme), which is now proposed to be made available only to cab aggregators.


 

Brahmanyan

Well-known member
Electric Cars have to go a long way to compete with conventional vehicles run on fossil fuels. Price of EV is high. Batteries used to run the EVs cost very high and drain off very fast. We have a REVA - EV in our house. This vehicle is small and run 80 Kms for each charge. Batteries of this model takes about two hours to get fully charged in our domestic power line of 220 V. In slow moving traffic of Bangalore batteries drain off fast and City does not have many Charging Units yet.
We have to wait a few more years to see whether Electric Vehicles will be successful in India.
Brahmanyan
Bangalore.
 

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