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Do you really need to celebrate and wish for a new year on Jan 1 2019????

#1
Why should we as bhramins need to wish and celebrate New year as this is purely a Christian tradition. And let us not brush it off by saying that the whole world runs on English calendar. Does any other faith wish us on a Tamil or a Kannada or a Telugu new year day, which is our traditional new year day. We are diluting ourself and then blaming on all the atrocities forced on us which infortunately we ourself have accepted. Let us think and act appropriately to save our beliefs.
 

Brahmanyan

Well-known member
#2
The Mangala Mantra often recited after a pooja or religious ceremony goes:
स्वस्तिप्रजाभ्यः परिपालयंतां न्यायेन मार्गेण महीं महीशाः ।
गोब्राह्मणेभ्यः शुभमस्तु नित्यं लोकाः समस्ताः सुखिनोभवंतु
ॐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः |​
svasti-prajā-bhyaḥ pari-pāla-yaṁtāṁ nyāyena mārgeṇa mahīṁ mahīśāḥ |
go-brāhmaṇebhyaḥ śubham-astu nityaṁ lokāḥ samastāḥ sukhino-bhavaṁtu ||
auṁ śāntiḥ śāntiḥ śāntiḥ |​
Translation
May the well-being of all people be protected By the powerful and mighty leaders be with law and justice.
May good success be with all cows (divinity) and scholars, May all (samastah) the worlds (lokha) become (bhavantu) happy (sukhino).
Om peace, peace, peace"​
All beings born in the world are interdependent. That is the law of creation. Why should we weave a cocoon around us and separate us in the name is Sex, Nationality, Race, Religion, and Caste , which are our own creation out of our mental attributes.
Let us break this cocoon and come out to celebrate the New Year 2019 with all others and pray for the welfare of all living beings.
Brahmanyan
Bangalore.
 
#3
Interesting point of view. It is true that the current Gregorian calender was introduced in 1582 in the Vatican by Pope Gregory XIII, and is known as the Christian calendar. But it is also the International standard for the representation of dates and times. ( ISO 8601 2004). I don't think this is something to "brush aside". It is an accepted count of the the motion of our planet in a common way to connect the people of the world. Without it, we would have several "New Year's" days, which would result in chaos if we ever needed to agree on anything. Just in India alone there are so many New Years days!

It is also not true that others do not celebrate with us. Here in London, the Chinese New Year is celebrated in February by all, the Gujerati New Year is celebrated the day after Diwali. The only fact is that people are unaware of the different New Years days.

My point of view is that we have a common counting system - let us not use that to divide and segregate.
 
#4
The Mangala Mantra often recited after a pooja or religious ceremony goes:
स्वस्तिप्रजाभ्यः परिपालयंतां न्यायेन मार्गेण महीं महीशाः ।​
गोब्राह्मणेभ्यः शुभमस्तु नित्यं लोकाः समस्ताः सुखिनोभवंतु ॥​
ॐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः |​
svasti-prajā-bhyaḥ pari-pāla-yaṁtāṁ nyāyena mārgeṇa mahīṁ mahīśāḥ |​
go-brāhmaṇebhyaḥ śubham-astu nityaṁ lokāḥ samastāḥ sukhino-bhavaṁtu ||​
auṁ śāntiḥ śāntiḥ śāntiḥ |​
Translation
May the well-being of all people be protected By the powerful and mighty leaders be with law and justice.​
May good success be with all cows (divinity) and scholars, May all (samastah) the worlds (lokha) become (bhavantu) happy (sukhino).
Om peace, peace, peace"​
All beings born in the world are interdependent. That is the law of creation. Why should we weave a cocoon around us and separate us in the name is Sex, Nationality, Race, Religion, and Caste , which are our own creation out of our mental attributes.
Let us break this cocoon and come out to celebrate the New Year 2019 with all others and pray for the welfare of all living beings.
Brahmanyan
Bangalore.
I am willing to break the cocoon (we already are)...but NO to no reception on the other side. And Jan 1 means only a new year as pet the official calendar. All these Sanskrit verses (which I am too aware of) doesn't talk of anything called AD or BC....so....no celebration from my end. I hope sane sanathana dharm followers and those who hope to keep our tradition alive would think alike. Adiyen Ramanuja Daasan...
 
#5
I am staying in a flat. Here people of different faiths stay. We participate on the principle ' join in others happiness' . but stick to our principles don't eat non veg, don't take liquor, do sandhyavandanam, like that . we are a social being. in purana says, we can be a sanyasin in grihastasramam also. similarly we can be a Brahmin in social gatherings also. don't hesitate to join social functions
 
#6
Accepting other faith and celebrating it itself is a droham. Fine....please go ahead and be that neutral ones....I have no issues, I will be social for what is relevant to us as Hindus and can't be celebrating them. It does.not mean than I dislike them or hate them, they are still friends and colleagues. But, I will stick to my values and cannot dilute it by agreeing and celebrating those which are not our tradition. I don't see a point when none of those Faith's have really appreciated Hindus, infact opposed and criticised us severly...and why we need to fall low to them. Please carry on.
 

prasad1

Well-known member
#7
Why should we as bhramins need to wish and celebrate New year as this is purely a Christian tradition. And let us not brush it off by saying that the whole world runs on English calendar. Does any other faith wish us on a Tamil or a Kannada or a Telugu new year day, which is our traditional new year day. We are diluting ourself and then blaming on all the atrocities forced on us which infortunately we ourself have accepted. Let us think and act appropriately to save our beliefs.
NO, YOU DO NOT have to wish anyone any thing.
Some of us are human beings and wish our fellow beings good things. That also is our prerogative.
This site has been created by a visionary individual for all. It is not limited to any caste, nationality religion, or gender.
We like it that way.
So there is no room for isolation on the basis of caste.
Thank you.
 
#8
Interesting point of view. It is true that the current Gregorian calender was introduced in 1582 in the Vatican by Pope Gregory XIII, and is known as the Christian calendar. But it is also the International standard for the representation of dates and times. ( ISO 8601 2004). I don't think this is something to "brush aside". It is an accepted count of the the motion of our planet in a common way to connect the people of the world. Without it, we would have several "New Year's" days, which would result in chaos if we ever needed to agree on anything. Just in India alone there are so many New Years days!

It is also not true that others do not celebrate with us. Here in London, the Chinese New Year is celebrated in February by all, the Gujerati New Year is celebrated the day after Diwali. The only fact is that people are unaware of the different New Years days.

My point of view is that we have a common counting system - let us not use that to divide and segregate.
I agree with you. We are living with our friends irrespective of their religious background.
 
#9
NO, YOU DO NOT have to wish anyone any thing.
Some of us are human beings and wish our fellow beings good things. That also is our prerogative.
This site has been created by a visionary individual for all. It is not limited to any caste, nationality religion, or gender.
We like it that way.
So there is no room for isolation on the basis of caste.
Thank you.[/QUO

Lovely. Thank you for the explanation. I thought that this was Tamil Brahmins forum....looks otherwise. Or please change the name.
 
#11
I am sure we can celebrate in a secular way. Much in the same way that people are putting up Christmas trees and wishing each other Merry Christmas.

Be that as it may, however, the Gregorian calendar is a very rudimentary form of timekeeping and should not be regarded as an accurate measure of the measurement of months or years. The Tamil Calendar is far more precise.
 

mkrishna100

Well-known member
#12
Since the last 2 years there has been a slight shift in the ways Hindus are approaching NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS . The following changes I have observed
1) Temples are not kept open at Night for Beginning of New Year and religious heads of Various Hindu Organizations have issued instructions not to keep Temples and Religious Institutions open at Night and Celebrate New Year on a grand manner or special pujas being done on that day . That must be reserved for only Shivaratri and Vaikunta Ekadasi and Tamil New Year or respective New Year .
2) Reserve New Year Greetings only for Tamil / Regional New Year and need not Pro Actively send messages and greetings for Gregorian New Year .

In the past mechanically Christmas and New Year Greetings were extended to all but now I have seen the same being slowly coming down .

1 Jan is a Holiday for anyone whether one Celebrates the Gregorian New Year or not and each one is free to celebrate that Holiday in whatever way they can .
It is a welcome change if Hindus focus on celebrating their regional New Year with more enthusiasm and confine to just participating in the Gregorian New Year in a low key way just to go along with the crowd .
 

renuka

Well-known member
#13
Big deal actually...1st Jan is just like any other day...I dont need to view it as forbidden or holy either.

Its just a calendar.

I am going to quote Mufti Menk here..He said many people make a big deal of New Year saying its not in accordance with religion yet when we ask someone their bday they would only qoute the Gregorion calendar.
 

tbs

Well-known member
#14
hi

i have doubt....how many of us ready to celebrate tamil new year on jan 15?...thiruvalluvar day...there

are two tamil new year days...jan 15 and april 14....so traditions may change...its universal new year..

so nothing wrong....
 
#15
hi

i have doubt....how many of us ready to celebrate tamil new year on jan 15?...thiruvalluvar day...there

are two tamil new year days...jan 15 and april 14....so traditions may change...its universal new year..

so nothing wrong....

This would go against the traditional date of April 14. Why not stay with tradition, rather than an arbitrary date on a calendar?
 
#16
The Nomenclature of Months of Gregorian (1582) Calendar is Irrational and Not Scientific -July -August-September -October-November -December --Like Chaitram _Vaisaaki--Jeyshta-Aashada and so on. --However the Whole Wide WORLD (www,) is using --So we can also Use to fall in line

"Happy New Year 2019 to All members of Tamil Brahmins Forum
 
#17
The Nomenclature of Months of Gregorian (1582) Calendar is Irrational and Not Scientific -July -August-September -October-November -December --Like Chaitram _Vaisaaki--Jeyshta-Aashada and so on. --However the Whole Wide WORLD (www,) is using --So we can also Use to fall in line

"Happy New Year 2019 to All members of Tamil Brahmins Forum
The Sentence should Read => --Chaitram _Vaisaaki--Jeyshta-Aashada and so on are Rational and Scientific
 
#18
it has become a habit that we in general continue to mark the beginning of a year as new year. all our records are as per this calender. let us not procrastinate as to the origin of this nomenclature. when i tell my daughter that her birthday is on the star pooram in the month of purattasi, she retorts 'i can't be looking into the almanc to find the corresponding date. pl allow me to celebrate my birthday'on the date of birth.'. Quite sensible. Then what is wrong in celeberating January 1st as the beginning of New year
 

prasad1

Well-known member
#19
it has become a habit that we in general continue to mark the beginning of a year as new year. all our records are as per this calender. let us not procrastinate as to the origin of this nomenclature. when i tell my daughter that her birthday is on the star pooram in the month of purattasi, she retorts 'i can't be looking into the almanc to find the corresponding date. pl allow me to celebrate my birthday'on the date of birth.'. Quite sensible. Then what is wrong in celeberating January 1st as the beginning of New year
I like that explanation.
 
#20
Yes many family still do not celebrate Jan1 and instead they celebrate it as holiday by means of family gathering. I'm in London but neither our family nor most brahmin families celebrate new year here(Note:We are from Canary wharf but don't know status of other Tamil brahmins around UK but we 5 families here don't celebrate English calendar holidays and bank holidays). Usually Every year our families have get together and used these holidays for a picnic or teach our children's the art of gardening, swimming, pottery and in evening we send them to Ganesh sivam kurukkal based in London murugan kovil to teach them mantras. So still there are people from our community who never celebrates this stuffs are there
 

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