• Welcome to Tamil Brahmins forums.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our Free Brahmin Community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Distorting history via claims with no historical proof is the most lethal fad on the internet

prasad1

Active member
The human mind factors in a set of beliefs and facts at the time of formulating an opinion and we live in a time when being opinionated is appreciated and encouraged. But when your source of historical facts or news is a random social media page or even worse, a WhatsApp group, your opinion becomes the equivalent of rotten food being served at a posh restaurant.

On December 4, 1829, Lord William Bentinck, the then Governor-General of Bengal, passed a provincial resolution to abolish Sati - the medieval practice of self-immolation by widows on the funeral pyres of their respective (deceased) husbands. Whether or not the widows, already in grief due to the loss of their spouses - did it voluntarily or were forced to jump into pyre -- was immaterial. The colonial rulers considered the practice barbaric and forced correction of the same through changes to the Indian code of governance.

Over the years, accounts furnished in the name of several celebrated historians indicate how certain men and women in positions of power played an immense role in the abolishment of the barbaric practice which is known in the common tongue as 'Sati'. Records of ancient importance suggest that the bloodcurdling ritual had gained prominence in the Indian subcontinent between 5th and 7th century AD.

Like several other inane religious customs, Sati also has its origins in Indian mythology. In fact, it is no different than rituals which sentenced widows living in other parts of the world in the Middle Ages, to a life of utter despair or no life at all. In India, the custom was rejected by scholars and rulers alike. While the father of Indian renaissance, Raja Ram Mohan Roy, has been considered the most vocal critic of Sati, there are several others who openly opposed the custom and made efforts to educate people about the sheer mindlessness surrounding the practice. One such individual was British Christian missionary William Carey, the other is said to have been the Mughal emperor Akbar.



PAYAL ROHATGI & Team -BHAKTS of BHAGWAN RAM

@Payal_Rohatgi

https://twitter.com/Payal_Rohatgi/status/1133537844591382529

No ma’am NO Indian woman wants 2 go back to Sati. But yes a Hindu woman was studying history 2 reveal 2 biased #AntiHindu forces that Sati was not even a part of Hinduism. Sati which was a woman’s choice against sex slavery by Mughals became a #forced practice later in society
?


taslima nasreen

@taslimanasreen

I have heard some Indian women want to get back sati. Is it true? Good that I have no husband. So no one would force me to jump into my husband's funeral pyre.


Unfortunately, social media in modern-day India is abuzz with claims about Hindu women performing Sati in order to evade capture by Muslim rulers. However, these claims fail to take into consideration historical accounts which clearly state how benevolent monarchs such as Akbar did not approve of the particular practice and even made attempts, though unsuccessful, to outlaw it. What is even more appalling is that a custom which was abolished almost two centuries ago is being used today to build a narrative based on a deliberate distortion of history.

Sati is not the only subject social media users in India are being wrongly informed about. Similar assertions are being cast on the role of men and women who laid down their lives to rescue the country from British tyranny. A prime example of this is the man who is hailed as the father of the nation, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. Born to a family of merchants in coastal Gujarat, Gandhi is an international symbol of non-violence and essayed a pivotal role in freeing India. However, there are some self-proclaimed historiographers who not only cast aspersions over Gandhi's role in the freedom struggle but also strive to support their claims with data which has as much historical backing as the existence of flying unicorns and therefore, can be classified as fallacious.

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter



PIB India

@PIB_India

https://twitter.com/PIB_India/status/1133227912621043713

'Knowledge means realization of self'': #MahatmaGandhi #Gandhi150
12:26 AM - May 28, 2019


Medieval customs and the man gracing currency notes in India are not the only victims of this misinformation campaign. Such unfounded theories have also been used to attack Indians who laid and strengthened the roots of modern-day India such as the country's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. It is not uncommon to become a recipient of such fictitious lessons in history on social media platforms Facebook or Twitter and even more so on instant messaging application WhatsApp.

The importance of understanding what would drive a woman to pour kerosene on her body and set herself ablaze in the India of 2019 is considerably more than arguing about a medieval custom with facts which would not even hold before a jury of search engines.

It is, therefore, a deal of supreme importance for social media users to practice caution before placing their beliefs in a post or message without considering the professional opinion of celebrated historians. And for those who think they know more about history than the men and women who have devoted their lives to the accurate dissemination of historical data, they must first pick up a history book and read up about the difference between ‘Sati’ and ‘Jauhar’.

The views expressed by the author are personal and do not in any way represent those of Times Network.

 

KRN

Active member
On Sati - Good repartee (not sure whether it really happened though)

The burning of widows is your custom. But my nation's custom is to hang all men involved in burning a woman alive. So let us all act according to our national customs."

--Sir Charles Napier (1782-1853), British General, to Hindu priests who approached him with the complaint that Hindus should be allowed to follow their religious customs
 

KRN

Active member
Unfortunately, social media in modern-day India is abuzz with claims about Hindu women performing Sati in order to evade capture by Muslim rulers. However, these claims fail to take into consideration historical accounts which clearly state how benevolent monarchs such as Akbar did not approve of the particular practice and even made attempts, though unsuccessful, to outlaw it

The practice of Muslim invaders to kill all adult male captives and enslave all women and children is very well documented in historic records (written by camp followers of these invaders) as early as the 8th Cent CE when Muhammad Bin Kassim invaded Sindh. Subsequent invaders like Mahmud of Ghazni followed the same route. Alberuni who was a camp follower of Mahmud writes in detail about how Hindu women entered fire to escape rape and enslavement at the hands of the muslims. Alberuni is of the early 11th CE. Following Mahmud Ghazni, there were many Islamic invaders whose exploits in plunder and rapine is documented by Amir Khusrow, Badauni etc. Invaders like Muhammad Ghori, Kutbuddin Aibak, Iltumish, Balban, Allauddin Khilji (lover of Malik Khafur well known for destruction in Madurai, Dwarasamudra, Warangal etc) Tughlaks...the list of muslim invaders was huge and their exploits were documented not by Hindutvavadis but by their own muslim camp followers in vivid detail. No matter how much the pseudoseculars and their copy-paste chela's try to mask these truths, the documentary evidence spanning several centuries speak for themselves. When Hindus lived in constant fear of life every moment, for 8 or more centuries, between Ibn Kassim and Akbar, is it any surprise that the wartime contingency Jauhar became an established custom with some castes in some parts of the country - especially in the areas where Hindus had to bear the maximum brunt of Islamic attack and rapine - like Bengal (present day West Bengal and Bangladesh)?

Akbar's period is 16th - 17th CE. Even if, for argument's sake we accept that Akbar tried to outlaw Sati for a certain period in some parts of his empire, the stark reality in the form of the huge number of documents authored by muslim writers stare at us in the face, whereas there is no documentary proof of any forced Sati or Jauhar in the country prior to the Islamic invasions. There might be occasional voluntary cases especially among a few upper castes, when widows would have entered fire, either due to excessive affection for the departed husband or due to some other local reasons, but it was never a "custom" with any caste / sect of the banyan of Hinduism, until the invasion of Sindh by Kassim.
 

kamu

Active member
sati is only one example - of actions forced upon widows by the male dominated society. What about the large number of women forced to live a life of penury and destitution in Brindavan ? then, Mohandas gandhi was a great unifier of India in the struggle to achieve freedom from the british no doubt but both he and Jawaharlal Nehru have been glorified far beyond what they did - this was done deliberately to obfuscate historical happenings and to keep power within the Nehru family,is also a well known fact to many [ but coming out into the open only now] - the so- called historians and intellectuals of "modern" india had a large part to play in this - amartya Sen and Nalanda University is case in point ; why , even Manmohan singh's daughters were part of the game of getting themselves sinecures using his office. To talk of Akbar - plenty of stories { not all of them untrue or made up ] are surfacing- but no emperor can be totally benevolent if he has to rule a kingdom won from enemies - there is bound to be some amount of cruelty, plenty of subjugation, but the good will have to weighed against the bad. Sivaji was a benevolent ruler as far as the Hindus are concerned - ask the muslims : they will tell a different story ! Asoka was known for his "valour" in conqueriing his neighbouring kingdoms [ which naturally involved a lot of bloodshed], but his renunciation after the kalinga war and the good he did to the people outweighed his warfare.
 

nalanda

Active member
The human mind factors in a set of beliefs and facts at the time of formulating an opinion and we live in a time when being opinionated is appreciated and encouraged. But when your source of historical facts or news is a random social media page or even worse, a WhatsApp group, your opinion becomes the equivalent of rotten food being served at a posh restaurant.

On December 4, 1829, Lord William Bentinck, the then Governor-General of Bengal, passed a provincial resolution to abolish Sati - the medieval practice of self-immolation by widows on the funeral pyres of their respective (deceased) husbands. Whether or not the widows, already in grief due to the loss of their spouses - did it voluntarily or were forced to jump into pyre -- was immaterial. The colonial rulers considered the practice barbaric and forced correction of the same through changes to the Indian code of governance.

Over the years, accounts furnished in the name of several celebrated historians indicate how certain men and women in positions of power played an immense role in the abolishment of the barbaric practice which is known in the common tongue as 'Sati'. Records of ancient importance suggest that the bloodcurdling ritual had gained prominence in the Indian subcontinent between 5th and 7th century AD.

Like several other inane religious customs, Sati also has its origins in Indian mythology. In fact, it is no different than rituals which sentenced widows living in other parts of the world in the Middle Ages, to a life of utter despair or no life at all. In India, the custom was rejected by scholars and rulers alike. While the father of Indian renaissance, Raja Ram Mohan Roy, has been considered the most vocal critic of Sati, there are several others who openly opposed the custom and made efforts to educate people about the sheer mindlessness surrounding the practice. One such individual was British Christian missionary William Carey, the other is said to have been the Mughal emperor Akbar.




Unfortunately, social media in modern-day India is abuzz with claims about Hindu women performing Sati in order to evade capture by Muslim rulers. However, these claims fail to take into consideration historical accounts which clearly state how benevolent monarchs such as Akbar did not approve of the particular practice and even made attempts, though unsuccessful, to outlaw it. What is even more appalling is that a custom which was abolished almost two centuries ago is being used today to build a narrative based on a deliberate distortion of history.

Sati is not the only subject social media users in India are being wrongly informed about. Similar assertions are being cast on the role of men and women who laid down their lives to rescue the country from British tyranny. A prime example of this is the man who is hailed as the father of the nation, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. Born to a family of merchants in coastal Gujarat, Gandhi is an international symbol of non-violence and essayed a pivotal role in freeing India. However, there are some self-proclaimed historiographers who not only cast aspersions over Gandhi's role in the freedom struggle but also strive to support their claims with data which has as much historical backing as the existence of flying unicorns and therefore, can be classified as fallacious.

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter




Medieval customs and the man gracing currency notes in India are not the only victims of this misinformation campaign. Such unfounded theories have also been used to attack Indians who laid and strengthened the roots of modern-day India such as the country's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. It is not uncommon to become a recipient of such fictitious lessons in history on social media platforms Facebook or Twitter and even more so on instant messaging application WhatsApp.

The importance of understanding what would drive a woman to pour kerosene on her body and set herself ablaze in the India of 2019 is considerably more than arguing about a medieval custom with facts which would not even hold before a jury of search engines.

It is, therefore, a deal of supreme importance for social media users to practice caution before placing their beliefs in a post or message without considering the professional opinion of celebrated historians. And for those who think they know more about history than the men and women who have devoted their lives to the accurate dissemination of historical data, they must first pick up a history book and read up about the difference between ‘Sati’ and ‘Jauhar’.

The views expressed by the author are personal and do not in any way represent those of Times Network.

 
Top
Thank you for visiting TamilBrahmins.com

You seem to have an Ad Blocker on.

We depend on advertising to keep our content free for you. Please consider whitelisting us in your ad blocker so that we can continue to provide the content you have come here to enjoy.

Alternatively, consider upgrading your account to enjoy an ad-free experience along with numerous other benefits. To upgrade your account, please visit the account upgrades page

You can also donate financially if you can. Please Click Here on how you can do that.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks