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Brahminical conundrum: Tradition vs Modernity

Rudra_Maha

New member
Namaskaram to all.

A couple of days back, I was helping one of my friends who was about to get married. The observations I made were quite startling, at least to myself. I know, this topic has been discussed umpteen number of times in this community, but still a few doubts/ questions arose in me:

1. Most marriages, arranged ones, are nothing but business deals. I thought a Brahmin was someone who was supposed to eke out his living in a humble mannerwith high ideals. But what I saw on the ground was materialism gone wild. Too much of Artha and Kama at work. I’m not saying one must go back to the days of poverty, but how much is enough for a mans monthly salary. Men getting rejected for salaries less than 1 lakh a month. How many make the cut at a young age. Where did we go wrong or lose our way.

2. There was once a time when Brahmins would not even sing, take part in cutcheries, never travel abroad, it was the isai vellalars who mastered and preserved this art. But suddenly, in a 100 years time, Carnatic music has become like the identity of Brahmins, America looks better than India. Nothing wrong there, one can say, times change we have to change, but a religious tenet is not something I can change at will according to my own convenience. Anybody who moves out of this land of Bharat automatically loses his varna is what we were practising, did a few dollars change us?.

3. Reformation in a religion will have to come down to the normals from a learned master. Any other opinions coming from other directions will be taken not as an advice but as an assault. When us Brahmins who are supposed to lead the way have gone behind material pursuits, what’s the point in lamenting of children going astray in life. Met many people at a crowd. All old people with kids abroad, but none of them are happy with their children’s choices of their spouses, life etc. What’s stopping such people to voice out their opinions loudly rather than being hypocritical to their own kids.

4. Too much of emphasis on degrees and the aura around it. I have nothing against building brands or marketing oneself, but there’s a lot of ego and cutthroat competition within the community. Unless one is an IITian or a CA or an MS from US, there is no value addition.In what way is a priest lesser than any of these fellows. One of my own family member addressed the vaidikas as beggars in a condescending manner. Now ,the same fellow takes pride when his grandson chants mantras. A glorified NRI beggar growing up is what I felt.

To sum up, considering there is no support framework for a Brahmin both within and outside the community, what are the options left for anyone who wishes to lead a normal dharmic life:

a. If answer is: it’s changing times and we have to move on by getting rid of these rituals, well then fine, at least we can push the new gen towards materialism. That would make them physically rich at least and not worry about subscribing to Dharma.

b. Or if answer is in striking a balance, how does one go about it. What’s the balancing rope and how to manoeuvre it.

Elders who have gone through such experiences can kindly share your insights.
 

tbs

Well-known member
hi

now a days.....nobody is fully traditional or ultra modern too...even so called the brahmins in USA/UK

and other countries has more temples and many follow dollars with traditions.....more convenient now....

even in india....amavasya tarpanam /sradham doing in the early mornings in many places....so

purely convenient to the vadhyar/kartha....DHARMA BECAME CONVENIENT NOW....
 

praveen

Life is a dream
Staff member
I know a few people who have managed to strike a balance.
At home, they follow everything but when they are at work or in a public place, they adapt to the surroundings.

With so much political changes + changing times, it is essential to adapt like a chameleon. Else we are unnecessarily calling for attention. There is no point in trying to explain to those who ridicule us because they won't listen.
 

renuka

Gold Member
Gold Member
I know a few people who have managed to strike a balance.
At home, they follow everything but when they are at work or in a public place, they adapt to the surroundings.

With so much political changes + changing times, it is essential to adapt like a chameleon. Else we are unnecessarily calling for attention. There is no point in trying to explain to those who ridicule us because they won't listen.
Spot on! Just be in the NOW( as in the present moment) and focus on that.
If at work one has to work.
If at temple, pray!

If at home, be ourselves.
Not too hard.
Pure logic.
 

prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
a. If answer is: it’s changing times and we have to move on by getting rid of these rituals, well then fine, at least we can push the new gen towards materialism. That would make them physically rich at least and not worry about subscribing to Dharma.

b. Or if answer is in striking a balance, how does one go about it. What’s the balancing rope and how to manoeuvre it.

Elders who have gone through such experiences can kindly share your insights.
Depends on who is giving the advice and who that advice is for.
If a successful (material) person advises an aspirant who wants to succeed materially then the solution would be different, from a successful (guruji, say an Adi Sankara) advice to his disciple.
Both will be right.

When you lead an austere life you may create unnecessary hardship for your family and friend. If they want material success then your philosophy may create problems for others. In that case, I would advise your friend not to marry. , and be a burden. Be like Adi Shankara then.

If that person wants to marry, he has to compromise. PERIOD.

Maya Angelou once said, "Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better." All of us make mistakes, and we all may say a phrase or word out of ignorance that wounds. And when it's brought to your attention, you fix it and do the best you can to adjust your language.
But if you know better and you still forge ahead, as it strongly appears that Maimaron and Lederman did, you and only you put yourself in line for whatever consequences come your way.
 
Last edited:

prasad1

Gold Member
Gold Member
3. Reformation in a religion will have to come down to the normals from a learned master. Any other opinions coming from other directions will be taken not as an advice but as an assault. When us Brahmins who are supposed to lead the way have gone behind material pursuits, what’s the point in lamenting of children going astray in life. Met many people at a crowd. All old people with kids abroad, but none of them are happy with their children’s choices of their spouses, life etc. What’s stopping such people to voice out their opinions loudly rather than being hypocritical to their own kids.

4. Too much of emphasis on degrees and the aura around it. I have nothing against building brands or marketing oneself, but there’s a lot of ego and cutthroat competition within the community. Unless one is an IITian or a CA or an MS from US, there is no value addition.In what way is a priest lesser than any of these fellows. One of my own family member addressed the vaidikas as beggars in a condescending manner. Now ,the same fellow takes pride when his grandson chants mantras. A glorified NRI beggar growing up is what I felt.


Elders who have gone through such experiences can kindly share your insights.
I live abroad, I am not a conformist and never was.
I was involved in our town Temple building financially as well as physically.
I was chairman of the board and raised $4m for this effort. I have been religious committee chairman etc.
I attend the Chinmaya group since I was a 20-year-old College student.

But never lived in Tamil Nadu and having grown up in a cosmopolitan town, and in a financially successful family, my upbringing is different than average TB.
So I do not have any hangups. I am a TB and I have no shame in being one. On the contrary, I am proud of my values.

I am sorry that you feel that I am a beggar, but that is your mistake.
I am financially successful and happily settled with myself.
 

ekaputra

Active member
Most marriages, arranged ones, are nothing but business deals. I thought a Brahmin was someone who was supposed to eke out his living in a humble mannerwith high ideals. But what I saw on the ground was materialism gone wild.
Parents have a duty to provide their children a foundation so that they (the children) can take care of themselves for the rest of their lives. And what the parents are able to save after that should be for themselves so that they can continue their lives in reasonable comfort and dignity.

No man with an iota of self esteem will accept (let alone demand) money/ apartment/ vehicle/ ac/ fridge etc from his in-laws. If the girl's parents want to give her ornaments as a token of their love - well, that is between the girl and her parents - it can never be a demand from the boy's people. It is for the couple to thereafter build their home from their earnings.

The period between betrothal and wedding is often a period of great trial for the girl's immediate relatives. Where is the need to rent a marriage hall paying a few (or several) lacs and invite a few hundred people and arrange accommodation for out station guests and then expect the girl's parents to pay for all the expenses. It would suffice to perform the wedding ceremony in a temple to satisfy religious sentiments and then register the marriage. My nephew's wedding was performed in a simple manner in Kapaleeswarar temple after getting proper permission from the temple authorities. There were no demands on the girl's people nor any bossing from our side for reason of being the boy's people! The only request from the boy's parents (my cousin and brother-in-law) was that it should be preferably a temple of Lord Shiva.
 

prveeraraghavan

New member
Namaskaram to all.

A couple of days back, I was helping one of my friends who was about to get married. The observations I made were quite startling, at least to myself. I know, this topic has been discussed umpteen number of times in this community, but still a few doubts/ questions arose in me:

1. Most marriages, arranged ones, are nothing but business deals. I thought a Brahmin was someone who was supposed to eke out his living in a humble mannerwith high ideals. But what I saw on the ground was materialism gone wild. Too much of Artha and Kama at work. I’m not saying one must go back to the days of poverty, but how much is enough for a mans monthly salary. Men getting rejected for salaries less than 1 lakh a month. How many make the cut at a young age. Where did we go wrong or lose our way.

2. There was once a time when Brahmins would not even sing, take part in cutcheries, never travel abroad, it was the isai vellalars who mastered and preserved this art. But suddenly, in a 100 years time, Carnatic music has become like the identity of Brahmins, America looks better than India. Nothing wrong there, one can say, times change we have to change, but a religious tenet is not something I can change at will according to my own convenience. Anybody who moves out of this land of Bharat automatically loses his varna is what we were practising, did a few dollars change us?.

3. Reformation in a religion will have to come down to the normals from a learned master. Any other opinions coming from other directions will be taken not as an advice but as an assault. When us Brahmins who are supposed to lead the way have gone behind material pursuits, what’s the point in lamenting of children going astray in life. Met many people at a crowd. All old people with kids abroad, but none of them are happy with their children’s choices of their spouses, life etc. What’s stopping such people to voice out their opinions loudly rather than being hypocritical to their own kids.

4. Too much of emphasis on degrees and the aura around it. I have nothing against building brands or marketing oneself, but there’s a lot of ego and cutthroat competition within the community. Unless one is an IITian or a CA or an MS from US, there is no value addition.In what way is a priest lesser than any of these fellows. One of my own family member addressed the vaidikas as beggars in a condescending manner. Now ,the same fellow takes pride when his grandson chants mantras. A glorified NRI beggar growing up is what I felt.

To sum up, considering there is no support framework for a Brahmin both within and outside the community, what are the options left for anyone who wishes to lead a normal dharmic life:

a. If answer is: it’s changing times and we have to move on by getting rid of these rituals, well then fine, at least we can push the new gen towards materialism. That would make them physically rich at least and not worry about subscribing to Dharma.

b. Or if answer is in striking a balance, how does one go about it. What’s the balancing rope and how to manoeuvre it.

Elders who have gone through such experiences can kindly share your insights.

If being a Brahmin was more of a societal role that wasn't dictated from birth, like in the ancient times, these post wouldn't have been made.

The immediate solution in my opinion is that anyone who has the discipline and rigour to go through a Pathashala and become a Vaadyar should be allowed to, regardless of what family they were born into.
You will then have more vaadyars and vaidikas and won't continually worry about the diminishing birth-Brahmin population.
 

prveeraraghavan

New member
I live abroad, I am not a conformist and never was.
I was involved in our town Temple building financially as well as physically.
I was chairman of the board and raised $4m for this effort. I have been religious committee chairman etc.
I attend the Chinmaya group since I was a 20-year-old College student.

But never lived in Tamil Nadu and having grown up in a cosmopolitan town, and in a financially successful family, my upbringing is different than average TB.
So I do not have any hangups. I am a TB and I have no shame in being one. On the contrary, I am proud of my values.

I am sorry that you feel that I am a beggar, but that is your mistake.
I am financially successful and happily settled with myself.

Which values that you hold would you say are strictly TB ones?
 

tbs

Well-known member
Parents have a duty to provide their children a foundation so that they (the children) can take care of themselves for the rest of their lives. And what the parents are able to save after that should be for themselves so that they can continue their lives in reasonable comfort and dignity.

No man with an iota of self esteem will accept (let alone demand) money/ apartment/ vehicle/ ac/ fridge etc from his in-laws. If the girl's parents want to give her ornaments as a token of their love - well, that is between the girl and her parents - it can never be a demand from the boy's people. It is for the couple to thereafter build their home from their earnings.

The period between betrothal and wedding is often a period of great trial for the girl's immediate relatives. Where is the need to rent a marriage hall paying a few (or several) lacs and invite a few hundred people and arrange accommodation for out station guests and then expect the girl's parents to pay for all the expenses. It would suffice to perform the wedding ceremony in a temple to satisfy religious sentiments and then register the marriage. My nephew's wedding was performed in a simple manner in Kapaleeswarar temple after getting proper permission from the temple authorities. There were no demands on the girl's people nor any bossing from our side for reason of being the boy's people! The only request from the boy's parents (my cousin and brother-in-law) was that it should be preferably a temple of Lord Shiva.
hi

everything is fine....but now a days ...marriage is just show off the wealth....in some cases...not all..

if the boy's side never demand a dowry...but gal side also make an issue for not demanding dowry etc...

simple things are nice in paper/opinion,,,but ground reality is very different....now a days...many boys

parents are ready to share marriage expenses equally...this is the issue with both parties agreed upon...
 

usaiyer

Active member
It is all interesting in the game of life. our younger generation
have become victims of material pursuits and rat race members trying to make it big in career. Pursue your passion
or it is my life is often the argument they put forward in defense Parents have been guilty or inadvertently failed in giving them the needed guidance and direction.
Is this new found freedom and material pursuit good in the name of changing times?
western culture let go their wards to independence even as younger kids and economically also they are on their own.
More logic than emotion governs life for them and parents
are not guardians anymore of kids as it is in our system?
It is not clear which way society will move in the future,?
 
OP
Rudra_Maha

Rudra_Maha

New member
I know a few people who have managed to strike a balance.
At home, they follow everything but when they are at work or in a public place, they adapt to the surroundings.

With so much political changes + changing times, it is essential to adapt like a chameleon. Else we are unnecessarily calling for attention. There is no point in trying to explain to those who ridicule us because they won't listen.
I agree partially. Being in the present is the key, i can understand. Effective role transitioning is indeed an Art.

Adaptability is a noble virtue, but i dont think it should come at the cost of my identity. In this ever changing world, more than adaptability, its all about putting forth ones stand and becoming more louder. After all, its a democracy, a game of numbers, we are all mere numbers on an excel sheet. To the leaders and power brokers, i'm just one among the 1.2 lakh people in my constituency.

If i dont speak up, then i'm gonna drown in this pool of humanity.

I'm not saying one must be straightforward, but atleast one must be capable of standing up for his beliefs right. Maybe since we have gave up that trait of explaining stuff, now there is too much of overloading of non sense about us. When we look around, we see our own people buying into such fake stuff, young kids mainly, because we've stopped explaining stuff. I'm sure you too would have felt the experience of an elder telling, you need not know all those stuff, just do what we say. This culminates in the form of superstition or outright rejection of the culture as a whole.

I don't think Camouflaging can be a wise strategy all the time. Sometimes, should'nt we turn the tables and say: enough of running away, hiding. Time to take charge of the situation?.

I can think of many political situations, where people lost their family, property, life's and had to become refugees in their own country. If only, they had taken a stand, all tragedy, whichever followed could have been averted.
 
OP
Rudra_Maha

Rudra_Maha

New member
I live abroad, I am not a conformist and never was.
I was involved in our town Temple building financially as well as physically.
I was chairman of the board and raised $4m for this effort. I have been religious committee chairman etc.
I attend the Chinmaya group since I was a 20-year-old College student.

But never lived in Tamil Nadu and having grown up in a cosmopolitan town, and in a financially successful family, my upbringing is different than average TB.
So I do not have any hangups. I am a TB and I have no shame in being one. On the contrary, I am proud of my values.

I am sorry that you feel that I am a beggar, but that is your mistake.
I am financially successful and happily settled with myself.
I never addresses you as a beggar. The beggar i mentioned was my own NRI cousin and his elitist grandfather, who are in-laws through my sister. His idea of anyone practising Vaideekam was a beggar. He carried such a narrow opinion about the vedic brahmins himself and then when his NRI grandson chants a few shlokas, immediately jumps in joy as if he has been blessed with Vashistha himself. I was only calling out this hypocrisy.

Its great you're proud of the values you're carrying. I'm never denying any of those. Whatever you've done is a credit for you and your generations.

Like the way, you're a non conformist, i'm a conformist. This did not come from being adamant or carrying a supermacist attitude of being a brahmin, but because we've had losses in the family. My ancestors were killed or lets just say hunted only because they subscribed to a certain Dharma. From then on, if there is one thing we've decided, its all about conformance to the Dharmasastras. However, because of that, we've never gone out and tried to advice/pull /force people over to our side either.

Each person i see, carries a definition for himself. Just like say, there can be multiple versions of Ramayana ,but the Valmiki version is the accepted standard one.

One live example: I attended this marriage of a couple in Chennai. The reception had a cocktail party. Alcohol, wines and all sorts of spirits were floating there. A week after marriage, the boys mother passed away, he was reading garuda puranam as a ritual after her final rites were done. The chapter he was reading was about the paap being committed due to alcohol consumption. The chap was reading it and casually went to next page, upon questioning about his opinion on it, he just said, they're all hocus pocus and fake. This maybe normal to him, but to me, this is hypocrisy. But you know what, he says, he is a proud brahmin. What can i say to him now?...

Hence, from my perspective: unless one conforms to the Shastras, then there is no point in being proud of something which we do not even possess. We're only living a delusion. Life then, is just a mirage/maya as Shankara says.

N.B: I was only calling out the callousness practiced by the in-laws. Was'nt aimed at you personally.
 

praveen

Life is a dream
Staff member
I agree partially. Being in the present is the key, i can understand. Effective role transitioning is indeed an Art.

Adaptability is a noble virtue, but i dont think it should come at the cost of my identity. In this ever changing world, more than adaptability, its all about putting forth ones stand and becoming more louder. After all, its a democracy, a game of numbers, we are all mere numbers on an excel sheet. To the leaders and power brokers, i'm just one among the 1.2 lakh people in my constituency.

If i dont speak up, then i'm gonna drown in this pool of humanity.

I'm not saying one must be straightforward, but atleast one must be capable of standing up for his beliefs right. Maybe since we have gave up that trait of explaining stuff, now there is too much of overloading of non sense about us. When we look around, we see our own people buying into such fake stuff, young kids mainly, because we've stopped explaining stuff. I'm sure you too would have felt the experience of an elder telling, you need not know all those stuff, just do what we say. This culminates in the form of superstition or outright rejection of the culture as a whole.

I don't think Camouflaging can be a wise strategy all the time. Sometimes, should'nt we turn the tables and say: enough of running away, hiding. Time to take charge of the situation?.

I can think of many political situations, where people lost their family, property, life's and had to become refugees in their own country. If only, they had taken a stand, all tragedy, whichever followed could have been averted.

I am all for speaking up and fighting. Camouflaging is not a fool proof way or the only way.

One must be able to choose their fights.

In my experience, I have seen several people stand up but due to lack of support from our own folks, they have just gone out of sight.
The biggest hurdle to our progress is only us. As a community, we do not support one another. We want better things for us, but we do not want to do the work. We simply want it handed it to us.

You hit it on the head when you said "we have stopped explaining stuff".

As a teenager, I had a lot of questions and no one took time to explain the reason behind various things.
 

usaiyer

Active member
we cannot say that things were not explained. our Acharyas were there .They have been touring our places on foot and interacting with the community .But due to a life of misery and insufficiency and big families to support ,with no regular incomes ,people were looking for the feast thrown open during such visits ,How can any one care to listen under such circumstance ?,Even today the economic means of our community is not enviable and day to day life is one of struggle, This situation should change, Then we can expect changes as #14 expects.
 

a-TB

Well-known member
Namaskaram to all.

A couple of days back, I was helping one of my friends who was about to get married. The observations I made were quite startling, at least to myself. I know, this topic has been discussed umpteen number of times in this community, but still a few doubts/ questions arose in me:

1. Most marriages, arranged ones, are nothing but business deals. I thought a Brahmin was someone who was supposed to eke out his living in a humble mannerwith high ideals. But what I saw on the ground was materialism gone wild. Too much of Artha and Kama at work. I’m not saying one must go back to the days of poverty, but how much is enough for a mans monthly salary. Men getting rejected for salaries less than 1 lakh a month. How many make the cut at a young age. Where did we go wrong or lose our way.

2. There was once a time when Brahmins would not even sing, take part in cutcheries, never travel abroad, it was the isai vellalars who mastered and preserved this art. But suddenly, in a 100 years time, Carnatic music has become like the identity of Brahmins, America looks better than India. Nothing wrong there, one can say, times change we have to change, but a religious tenet is not something I can change at will according to my own convenience. Anybody who moves out of this land of Bharat automatically loses his varna is what we were practising, did a few dollars change us?.

3. Reformation in a religion will have to come down to the normals from a learned master. Any other opinions coming from other directions will be taken not as an advice but as an assault. When us Brahmins who are supposed to lead the way have gone behind material pursuits, what’s the point in lamenting of children going astray in life. Met many people at a crowd. All old people with kids abroad, but none of them are happy with their children’s choices of their spouses, life etc. What’s stopping such people to voice out their opinions loudly rather than being hypocritical to their own kids.

4. Too much of emphasis on degrees and the aura around it. I have nothing against building brands or marketing oneself, but there’s a lot of ego and cutthroat competition within the community. Unless one is an IITian or a CA or an MS from US, there is no value addition.In what way is a priest lesser than any of these fellows. One of my own family member addressed the vaidikas as beggars in a condescending manner. Now ,the same fellow takes pride when his grandson chants mantras. A glorified NRI beggar growing up is what I felt.

To sum up, considering there is no support framework for a Brahmin both within and outside the community, what are the options left for anyone who wishes to lead a normal dharmic life:

a. If answer is: it’s changing times and we have to move on by getting rid of these rituals, well then fine, at least we can push the new gen towards materialism. That would make them physically rich at least and not worry about subscribing to Dharma.

b. Or if answer is in striking a balance, how does one go about it. What’s the balancing rope and how to manoeuvre it.

Elders who have gone through such experiences can kindly share your insights.
I am not an elder but have views based on experience of myself and learning by watching others. I am stating the views as a set of guidelines and rules. It is not directed at anyone. Just style of expression,

1. There are Brahmin haters in the society and some play liberal card but they have hate in their heart. You find them in every society in India and even in forums such as this one. You dont see them outside India very much.

With such people just stay away or fight back if they attack you first. Dont invite a fight but do not back down. Not talking about violence but develop strategies ahead of time to fight back. Sometimes flight is the best answer. Leave the state or even the country if need be.

Life is not worth wasting on hateful people for something you had no say about your own birth.

2. Follow your rituals and cultural norms and understand their significance well. Do not fall prey to superstitions.

3. Treat others as fellow Indians in India. Approach life as an Indian first and then a Brahmin. Even better think of yourself as a human being first and see the others as human beings . I cannot think of a more satvic approach to life than viewing others as fellow Indians or fellow human beings. With that broad outlook you will not find many enemies. But the transformation has to start in your heart first

4, Do not believe Brahninism is about some symbols. No need to flaunt symbols but that does not mean you have to hide that either. Just live life with love and kindness to all unless you run into unreasonable people. Dont trust anyone if they say they are beyond caste. Anyone that talks like that cannot be trusted.

5. Vasudaiva Kutumbakam as PM says is a good attitude to have. Be kind to others and animals. If possible practice vegan/vegetarianism as a value.

I think Brahmin values and character will survive the test of time if the above guidelines are followed.

The issue comes when it comes to weddings. If the community develops high values children will seek similar alliance. Today we live in contradictions and under spell of western culture aping all the west does in the worst manner possible. That will ensure the death of the Brahin community and that may be a good thing. So getting back to roots of right values is a must for survival.
 

KRS

Well-known member
I am not an elder but have views based on experience of myself and learning by watching others. I am stating the views as a set of guidelines and rules. It is not directed at anyone. Just style of expression,

1. There are Brahmin haters in the society and some play liberal card but they have hate in their heart. You find them in every society in India and even in forums such as this one. You dont see them outside India very much.

With such people just stay away or fight back if they attack you first. Dont invite a fight but do not back down. Not talking about violence but develop strategies ahead of time to fight back. Sometimes flight is the best answer. Leave the state or even the country if need be.

Life is not worth wasting on hateful people for something you had no say about your own birth.

2. Follow your rituals and cultural norms and understand their significance well. Do not fall prey to superstitions.

3. Treat others as fellow Indians in India. Approach life as an Indian first and then a Brahmin. Even better think of yourself as a human being first and see the others as human beings . I cannot think of a more satvic approach to life than viewing others as fellow Indians or fellow human beings. With that broad outlook you will not find many enemies. But the transformation has to start in your heart first

4, Do not believe Brahninism is about some symbols. No need to flaunt symbols but that does not mean you have to hide that either. Just live life with love and kindness to all unless you run into unreasonable people. Dont trust anyone if they say they are beyond caste. Anyone that talks like that cannot be trusted.

5. Vasudaiva Kutumbakam as PM says is a good attitude to have. Be kind to others and animals. If possible practice vegan/vegetarianism as a value.

I think Brahmin values and character will survive the test of time if the above guidelines are followed.

The issue comes when it comes to weddings. If the community develops high values children will seek similar alliance. Today we live in contradictions and under spell of western culture aping all the west does in the worst manner possible. That will ensure the death of the Brahin community and that may be a good thing. So getting back to roots of right values is a must for survival.
Sir,

Very well thought out response.

World has changed. So Purva Mimamsa is nowadays only a relic of yester years.

For the industrialized world, Vedanta is more apt.

But one should know the values of the past can still guide us. And for a lot of us they are in our DNA.

I try to live by two axioms:
1. Do not hurt another Jeeva
2. Live to understand who am I?

That’s it. I am fortunate to have grand children and everything in life is a blessing after that.

Thank you.
 

tks

Well-known member
Sir,

Very well thought out response.

World has changed. So Purva Mimamsa is nowadays only a relic of yester years.

For the industrialized world, Vedanta is more apt.

But one should know the values of the past can still guide us. And for a lot of us they are in our DNA.

I try to live by two axioms:
1. Do not hurt another Jeeva
2. Live to understand who am I?

That’s it. I am fortunate to have grand children and everything in life is a blessing after that.

Thank you.
Hello Sri KRS

I happened to visit the forum after many months. Nice to see your post after many years. So you are a Thatha now. Super

regards
 

ashok68

Active member
Nice to see contributions of few veterans after a long time which add value to the content and make the thread more interesting.
 

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