• Welcome to Tamil Brahmins forums.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our Free Brahmin Community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

7 new things I learned from Mark Zuckerberg in his interview with Y Combinator

Status
Not open for further replies.

vgane

Well-known member
[h=1]7 new things I learned from Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg in his interview with Y Combinator[/h]

Prominent startup accelerator Y Combinator did a 30-minute long interview with Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg recently. Here are the highlights.
[h=2]1. His interest in psychology led to Facebook.[/h] Mark studied psychology and computer science while in college, and was fascinated by what makes people tick.
One of the things that you learn when you study psychology is that there are all these parts of the brain which are geared just towards understanding people, understanding language, how to communicate with each other, understanding facial expressions, emotions, processing.
Yet when I looked out at the internet in 2004, which was when I was getting started [with Facebook], you can find almost anything else that you wanted. You could find news, movies, music, reference materials, but the thing that mattered the most to people, which is other people and understanding what’s going on with them, just wasn’t there.
He realized that in order to index information about people, you needed to build tools that’ll allow them to express themselves.
[h=2]2. Facebook was an amalgamation of many little experiments he did at Harvard.[/h]
And there were probably 10 other things like that that I built when I was at Harvard before I actually got around to building the first version of Facebook that added a lot of these things together.
One of it was Course Match, a tool for people to see who else was taking the same classes as them.
People would just spend hours clicking through. Here are the courses that people are taking, and, wow, isn’t it interesting that this person is interested in these things? It was just text, right? There was nothing that was super interesting there, but that just struck me as people have this deep thirst to understand what’s going on with those around them.
[h=2]3. Like Google and many others, Mark Zuckerberg had no intention of turning Facebook into a full-fledged business.[/h] After launching the first version of Facebook, he chatted with friends about how someday someone would build a Facebook for the world. They never thought it would be them.
[h=2]4. Start with solving a problem, not with deciding that you want to build a company.[/h] Mark believes entrepreneurs should start by solving problems first instead of being determined to start a company from the get-go. He thinks a lot of top Silicon Valley founders had this same attitude.
I always think that this is kind of a perverse thing about Silicon Valley in a way, which is that people decide often that they want to start a company before they even decide what they want to do, and that just feels really backwards to me.
[h=2]5. Facebook’s whole management team left after Zuckerberg decided not to sell in Yahoo.[/h] Mark felt he failed to communicate his vision for the company properly to employees. As a result, many of them expected him to sell Facebook to Yahoo. In the end, the entire early management team left the company. Facebook was far from a certain success then, having only 10 million users.
For them, they joined, and being able to sell a company for a billion dollars after a couple years, that was like a home run. And it is a home run. I get that, but I think that the fact that I didn’t communicate very well about what we were trying to do caused this huge tension.
[h=2]6. There are tens of thousands of versions of Facebook running at any one time.[/h] Facebook has a testing framework that lets engineers to run experiments quickly.
At any given point in time, there’s not just one version of Facebook running in the world. There’s probably tens of thousands of versions running because engineers here have the power to try out an idea and ship it to maybe 10,000 people or 100,000 people. And then they get a readout on how that version performed compared to the baseline version of Facebook.
[h=2]7. The first version of News Feed was simple.[/h] Mark doesn’t believe in rolling out big changes to products. Even News Feed, now one of the most used products in the world, started out simple.
When we started off, we didn’t have anything like News Feed that showed you updates from what people were sharing. We just had profiles, and we found one of the big behaviors was people would just click around. They’d click on different profiles, hundreds of them, and they’d go through all their friends to see what people had changed, to see what the update was in their friend’s day.
And we learned that people were not just interested in looking up and learning about a person but also understanding the day-to-day changes. So first we made this product that just showed which of your friends had updated your profile, so that at least told you whose profile to click on. And then the first version of News Feed was really simple. It basically took the content that people were posting and put it in order on your home page.


https://www.techinasia.com/mark-zuckerberg-facebook-y-combinator

 

Vaagmi

Well-known member
7 new things I learned from Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg in his interview with Y Combinator



Prominent startup accelerator Y Combinator did a 30-minute long interview with Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg recently. Here are the highlights.
1. His interest in psychology led to Facebook.

Mark studied psychology and computer science while in college, and was fascinated by what makes people tick.
One of the things that you learn when you study psychology is that there are all these parts of the brain which are geared just towards understanding people, understanding language, how to communicate with each other, understanding facial expressions, emotions, processing.
Yet when I looked out at the internet in 2004, which was when I was getting started [with Facebook], you can find almost anything else that you wanted. You could find news, movies, music, reference materials, but the thing that mattered the most to people, which is other people and understanding what’s going on with them, just wasn’t there.
He realized that in order to index information about people, you needed to build tools that’ll allow them to express themselves.
2. Facebook was an amalgamation of many little experiments he did at Harvard.

And there were probably 10 other things like that that I built when I was at Harvard before I actually got around to building the first version of Facebook that added a lot of these things together.
One of it was Course Match, a tool for people to see who else was taking the same classes as them.
People would just spend hours clicking through. Here are the courses that people are taking, and, wow, isn’t it interesting that this person is interested in these things? It was just text, right? There was nothing that was super interesting there, but that just struck me as people have this deep thirst to understand what’s going on with those around them.
3. Like Google and many others, Mark Zuckerberg had no intention of turning Facebook into a full-fledged business.

After launching the first version of Facebook, he chatted with friends about how someday someone would build a Facebook for the world. They never thought it would be them.
4. Start with solving a problem, not with deciding that you want to build a company.

Mark believes entrepreneurs should start by solving problems first instead of being determined to start a company from the get-go. He thinks a lot of top Silicon Valley founders had this same attitude.
I always think that this is kind of a perverse thing about Silicon Valley in a way, which is that people decide often that they want to start a company before they even decide what they want to do, and that just feels really backwards to me.
5. Facebook’s whole management team left after Zuckerberg decided not to sell in Yahoo.

Mark felt he failed to communicate his vision for the company properly to employees. As a result, many of them expected him to sell Facebook to Yahoo. In the end, the entire early management team left the company. Facebook was far from a certain success then, having only 10 million users.
For them, they joined, and being able to sell a company for a billion dollars after a couple years, that was like a home run. And it is a home run. I get that, but I think that the fact that I didn’t communicate very well about what we were trying to do caused this huge tension.
6. There are tens of thousands of versions of Facebook running at any one time.

Facebook has a testing framework that lets engineers to run experiments quickly.
At any given point in time, there’s not just one version of Facebook running in the world. There’s probably tens of thousands of versions running because engineers here have the power to try out an idea and ship it to maybe 10,000 people or 100,000 people. And then they get a readout on how that version performed compared to the baseline version of Facebook.
7. The first version of News Feed was simple.

Mark doesn’t believe in rolling out big changes to products. Even News Feed, now one of the most used products in the world, started out simple.
When we started off, we didn’t have anything like News Feed that showed you updates from what people were sharing. We just had profiles, and we found one of the big behaviors was people would just click around. They’d click on different profiles, hundreds of them, and they’d go through all their friends to see what people had changed, to see what the update was in their friend’s day.
And we learned that people were not just interested in looking up and learning about a person but also understanding the day-to-day changes. So first we made this product that just showed which of your friends had updated your profile, so that at least told you whose profile to click on. And then the first version of News Feed was really simple. It basically took the content that people were posting and put it in order on your home page.


https://www.techinasia.com/mark-zuckerberg-facebook-y-combinator


That can be an inspiration for someone young from our community who reads this here. an opportunity is there beckoning to organize. It is easier to organize people under an identifiable banner.

From crowd funding of viable and profitable SME units for a handsome return on investment(or a quick sanction of credit facility/factoring services without collaterals) to door delivery of groceries and fresh vegetables on a daily basis on e platform, to Vadhyar services to the people in need to educational loans for going to Harward, to networking for jobs to match fixing for eligible youngsters the possibilities are immense.

Hey young man with the entrepreneurial bug in you, Are you listening?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top
Thank you for visiting TamilBrahmins.com

You seem to have an Ad Blocker on.

We depend on advertising to keep our content free for you. Please consider whitelisting us in your ad blocker so that we can continue to provide the content you have come here to enjoy.

Alternatively, consider upgrading your account to enjoy an ad-free experience along with numerous other benefits. To upgrade your account, please visit the account upgrades page

You can also donate financially if you can. Please Click Here on how you can do that.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks