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7 common English mistakes Indians make

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CHANDRU1849

Active member

Rediff furnished information on 7 common English mistakes Indian make, which is reproduced below:
[h=1]7 common English mistakes Indians make[/h]
English can be a very tricky language. Here's a list of very common mistakes we make.

1. Myself < insert name here >

If you've been our regular reader you'd probably know we've mentioned this one a few times already.
But we cannot stress enough how much we cringe each time someone introduces themselves as: "Myself so-and-so!"
Instead say:
My name is so-and-so!
or
I am so-and-so!

2: There, their, they're


Many of us use the three interchangeably -- while speaking and/or writing.
Unfortunately they mean totally different things.
'There' often indicates location.
For example: I will be in New Delhi next week. You could meet me there.
'Their' is a possessive pronoun.
For example: Citizens must be aware of their rights.
'They're' is short for 'they are'.
For example: Have you met Rajeshwari and Satyen? They're here to assist you!
Got the difference? :)

3. X years back

Here's yet another classic English mistake (that isn't necessarily an Indianism) that can be easily avoided!
Back is used to refer to a specific period in the past.
For example:
Back in my childhood things weren't as expensive.
Or
Back in the 19th century, people rode on horses.
Ago too is used to refer to a specific period in the past... but always in relation with the present.
For example:
The class started 10 minutes ago.
Or
I graduated from school 15 years ago.
When you use 'ago' the unsaid is always 'from the present moment'.
So, never say:
The class started 10 minutes back.
Or
I graduated from school 15 years back.

4. Starting with 'I'

When referring to a group that includes you, list yourself at the end:
For example:
Ramesh, Nitin, Raju, Suneet and I went on a road trip.
Not
I, Ramesh, Nitin, Raju and Suneet went on a road trip.
Nor
Ramesh, I, Nitin, Raju and Suneet went on a road trip.
Actually no other way really! :)
Remember the movie: It's The King and I and not the other way around!

5. Mr and Mrs...

Although it isn't wrong to say Mr and Mrs, it is politically correct to lead with the lady.
So while addressing a letter to a couple or introducing them, go with Mrs and Mr XYZ instead and be a gentleman!

6. Real sister

Again... what on earth is a 'real' sister (or a 'real' brother for that matter)?
This classic Indianism owes its roots to the way we refer to our relations in our mother tongue.
Unlike in English where a father's sister and a mother's sister are both aunts, Indians are very specific about our relationships.
While a bua can never be confused for a maasi in Hindi, the English like to keep things vague.
So a saga bhai is simply 'brother' (not real brother) a sagi behen is just 'sister' and any cousin from any side of your family irrespective of their gender is just that 'cousin' (not cousin brother or cousin sister).
Should you feel the need to specify a gender, you will have to do so in a follow up sentence.
For example: I have a cousin in Rajkot. She topped the university.
Get it? :)

7. 11 am in the morning

It has to be either 11 in the morning or 11 am not both.
Why? The same reason why it is ATM and not ATM Machine :)
Also, say noon or midnight rather than 12 noon or 12 midnight simply because there's just one noon and one midnight in the whole day :)


 

renuka

Well-known member
When I was in India at times I could not make out if it was a Yes or a No.

Some used to shake their head for a Yes and also a No.

BTW what is the need to shake one's head so much while speaking?
 
B

BRAHMACHARI

Guest
The following Indianisms are rampant especially among the IT folks:

can't able to; can able to; he don't want; she don't drink tea; he don't come only; she don't listen only;
 

Raji Ram

Active member
Thinking of 'I'...........

Teacher: Can you make a sentence starting with 'I'?

Student: Yes, ma'am! 'I' is....

Teacher: Stop! Always 'I' should be followed by 'am', OK?

Student: OK, ma'am! 'I' am the ninth letter of the English alphabet!!!
Teacher: :faint:
 

Naina_Marbus

Active member
I returned back to this thread only to report how many of us frequently speak of "returning back" !!

oops! did I do that myself?
 
Also we say in india that "i am doing this alone". In UK they say as "I am doing this on my own" :)

I am doing alone can also mean I am doing this work all alone without any one else doing the same work with me. If that is the message to be conveyed then there is nothing wrong in using the sentence.I am doing this on my own - this sentence conveys that some one is supposed to help me to do this but no one is helping; so I am doing this on my own without anyone helping me..So these two sentences connote two different contexts.
 

indianassault

Active member

Rediff furnished information on 7 common English mistakes Indian make, which is reproduced below:
7 common English mistakes Indians make


English can be a very tricky language. Here's a list of very common mistakes we make.

1. Myself < insert name here >

If you've been our regular reader you'd probably know we've mentioned this one a few times already.
But we cannot stress enough how much we cringe each time someone introduces themselves as: "Myself so-and-so!"
Instead say:
My name is so-and-so!
or
I am so-and-so!

2: There, their, they're


Many of us use the three interchangeably -- while speaking and/or writing.
Unfortunately they mean totally different things.
'There' often indicates location.
For example: I will be in New Delhi next week. You could meet me there.
'Their' is a possessive pronoun.
For example: Citizens must be aware of their rights.
'They're' is short for 'they are'.
For example: Have you met Rajeshwari and Satyen? They're here to assist you!
Got the difference? :)

3. X years back

Here's yet another classic English mistake (that isn't necessarily an Indianism) that can be easily avoided!
Back is used to refer to a specific period in the past.
For example:
Back in my childhood things weren't as expensive.
Or
Back in the 19th century, people rode on horses.
Ago too is used to refer to a specific period in the past... but always in relation with the present.
For example:
The class started 10 minutes ago.
Or
I graduated from school 15 years ago.
When you use 'ago' the unsaid is always 'from the present moment'.
So, never say:
The class started 10 minutes back.
Or
I graduated from school 15 years back.

4. Starting with 'I'

When referring to a group that includes you, list yourself at the end:
For example:
Ramesh, Nitin, Raju, Suneet and I went on a road trip.
Not
I, Ramesh, Nitin, Raju and Suneet went on a road trip.
Nor
Ramesh, I, Nitin, Raju and Suneet went on a road trip.
Actually no other way really! :)
Remember the movie: It's The King and I and not the other way around!

5. Mr and Mrs...

Although it isn't wrong to say Mr and Mrs, it is politically correct to lead with the lady.
So while addressing a letter to a couple or introducing them, go with Mrs and Mr XYZ instead and be a gentleman!

6. Real sister

Again... what on earth is a 'real' sister (or a 'real' brother for that matter)?
This classic Indianism owes its roots to the way we refer to our relations in our mother tongue.
Unlike in English where a father's sister and a mother's sister are both aunts, Indians are very specific about our relationships.
While a bua can never be confused for a maasi in Hindi, the English like to keep things vague.
So a saga bhai is simply 'brother' (not real brother) a sagi behen is just 'sister' and any cousin from any side of your family irrespective of their gender is just that 'cousin' (not cousin brother or cousin sister).
Should you feel the need to specify a gender, you will have to do so in a follow up sentence.
For example: I have a cousin in Rajkot. She topped the university.
Get it? :)

7. 11 am in the morning

It has to be either 11 in the morning or 11 am not both.
Why? The same reason why it is ATM and not ATM Machine :)
Also, say noon or midnight rather than 12 noon or 12 midnight simply because there's just one noon and one midnight in the whole day :)



Some tech lingos.

1) I will revert back ( correct usage : I will get back to you. or Rollback dependin upon usage ) .

2) We have preponed the event. ( advanced)

3) He is in States. Where in States? (There is only California or Florida or New Jersey...(No city names.) )

4) Like ATM, there s GRT thanga maligai, lol.
 
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