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  1. #61
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    Government Museum






    The Government Museum, or Egmore Museum, is the second oldest museum in the country, after Kolkata’s famed Indian Museum. It houses the National Art Gallery, Children’s Museum and Contemporary Art Gallery, in addition to a few others, and due to its location in the Pantheon complex, it boasts different architectural styles. As for its collections, this museum has one of the world’s richest collections of bronze artefacts, most of which are the remnants of the 10th-12th-century Cholas. The museum also has some fascinating displays, including a sensor-enabled dinosaur, manuscripts, and paintings by Raja Ravi Varma.
    Government Museum, Pantheon Road, Egmore, Chennai, India,



    Source: https://theculturetrip.com/asia/indi...it-in-chennai/
    Last edited by swathi25; 14-06-2018 at 10:21 AM.
  2. #62
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    Chennai Egmore rly station is 110 years old




    Chennai: It was in 1908 that No. 1 Boat Mail left Egmore railway station for its destination, Dhanushkodi. That was the first train said to be operated from the famed railway station about 110 years ago, after that there was no looking back.

    Egmore railway station has moved forward with time adding various amenities to render better service to passengers. Presently, the station is 110 years old, as it celebrated its 110th birthday on 11 June.

    The building of Egmore railway station was constructed in 1908, and it was on 11 June 1908 that the British authorities took over and began running trains, said a senior official at the station. A small extension work was taken up in 1930.

    The major extension work was taken up in 1980 on the main building of Egmore station. The first floor holds passenger reservation counter, the ground floor holds a vegetarian refreshment stall and offices of station officials.

    The main building had a width of 74 ft and a length of 300 ft in 1908. At present the main building has a length of 198.4 metres, breadth of 21 metres on the west end and 9.8 metres on the east end, said the official. Currently, the station handles about 55 trains per day on an average (both incoming and outgoing).

    Presently, the station has a footfall of one-and-a-half lakh people in a day (both long distance and local train). The moment worth recalling was in 1997 - 1998, for that was the time when the tracks were converted into broad gauge for the mainline. It was only in 2004, that metre gauge became history for local trains.

    The last metre gauge local train left Egmore after being flagged off by R Velu, the then Union Minister of State for Railways. Metre gauge local bid goodbye after a glorious service of 73 years. Minister Velu also flagged off the first broad gauge service on 1 November 2004.


    Read more at: https://www.newstodaynet.com/chennai...ld-100719.html
    Last edited by swathi25; 14-06-2018 at 10:22 AM.
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  4. #63
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    Chennai Landmark – The Egmore Station






    The Egmore railway station is a historic landmark of our city.
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    One of the most enduring and endearing landmarks of our city, the Egmore railway station, is 106 years old. It stands on a historic site, for this was where the East India Company converted a standing choultry into a fortified redoubt, early in the 18th Century. It later served as a sanatorium for soldiers and then in the 1800s as a Government Press. The Male and Female Orphan Asylums functioned from here when they moved out of Fort St George in the mid-18th Century. By the late 19th/early 20th Century, a part of this property was owned by Senjee Pulnee Andy (1831-1909). A graduate of the Madras Christian ­College, he became the first Indian to go abroad for a medical degree, qualifying at the University of St Andrew’s in 1860 and becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons a year later. Returning to India, he was appointed Superintendent of Vaccinations, Government of Madras. He converted to Christianity in 1863 and established the Native/National Church of India, which proved to be short-lived. An avid Freemason, he helped establish the Lodge Carnatic in the city in 1883 of which he was the second Master.

    Andy’s vast property in Egmore was eyed by the South Indian Railway Company (SIR) as a suitable location for its northern terminus. The SIR resulted from the amalgamation of three companies – the Great Southern Indian Railway Company (GSIRC) established in 1859, the Carnatic Railway Company (CRC) established in 1864, and the Pondicherry Railway Company Limited (PRC) established in the 1870s. The GSIRC operated in the Trichinopoly-Negapatam area while the CRC had its lines in the Conjeevaram-Arkonam region. The PRC was much smaller, limiting itself to eight miles near its headquarters. The SIR was founded in 1874 and took over all three lines.

    Read more at: https://sriramv.wordpress.com/2014/1...gmore-station/
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  6. #64
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    Chennai Egmore railway station






    Chennai Egmore (formerly known as Madras Egmore) is a railway station in Chennai, India. Situated in the neighborhood of Egmore, it is one of the two intercity railway terminals in the city. The station was built in 1906-08 as the terminus of the South Indian Railway Company.The building built in Gothic style is one of the prominent landmarks of Chennai. The main entrance to the station is situated on Gandhi-Irwin Road and the rear entrance on Poonamallee High Road.
    The station was apparently constructed from 8679 on land purchased from Pulney Andy,[2] The building is built in the Gothic style of architecture with imposing domes and corridors. It is one of the prominent landmarks of the city of Chennai. The recently opened northern entrance to this railway station is on the arterial Poonamalee High road in Chennai city.

    History

    History says that the station was actually a fort, called the Egmore Redoubt, similar to Leith Castle, which is a part of Santhome. It is said that the station came up in a place that once used to store ammunition for the British.




    The station building was constructed on a 2.5 acres (1.0 ha) land, for which 1.8 acres (0.73 ha) was acquired from Dr. Paul Andy who, in his letter to the 'Collector of Madras,' initially refused to sell his property owing to the difficulty with which he had purchased and developed the property. However, the South Indian Railway (SIR) Company, which was then operating train services to the south, persuaded him to sell the land, for which Andy claimed ₹1 lakh (US$1,500) as compensation. After acquiring the land, the SIR invited Henry Irwin, CIE (chief engineer), who did much of latter day Indo-Saracenic in Madras, and E. C. Bird, company architect, to design a building to suit the traffic need. After several alterations in the plan, the construction work began in September 1905 and was completed in 1908.[1] It was constructed by contractor T. Samynada Pillai of Bangalore at a cost of ₹17 lakh (US$25,000). The station was officially opened on 11 June 1908.[4][5]


    There was initially a demand that the station be named after Clive, which was, however, strongly opposed by the public as they wanted to name it Egmore. When the station was opened there was no electricity connection and a generator was used.[1] The station became the major meter-gauge terminal for Chennai after the formation of Southern Railway in 1951. Irwin and Bird worked on the design of the building, which was sympathetically added to in the 1930s and 1980s.[4] In the 1990s it was converted into a major broad gauge terminal, a role in which it became operational in 1998.[6]


    Read more at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chenna...ailway_station
    Last edited by swathi25; 14-06-2018 at 10:30 AM.
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  8. #65
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    A temple and its builder

    By Sriram v



    The age of the Thiruvetteswarar Temple in Triplicane is a mystery. Photo:S.R Raghunathan.
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    The age of the Thiruvetteeswarar Temple in Triplicane is a mystery. A passing reference to a Vedicchuram in Appar’s Tevaram has been cited to show that the shrine was in existence even in the 7th century. However, several other temples in Tamil Nadu lay claim to the same line as proof of their antiquity.

    The Shiva Linga here is probably much older than the temple, for it was discovered in the 18th century by Samudra Mudali, a ‘conicoply’ ( kanakkupillaior accountant) of the East India Company. It was in a sandy tract through which a small river (probably the Triplicane River that no longer exists) ran. The property was owned by the Nawab of the Carnatic and Samudra Mudali purchased it, building thereafter, “from his private resources a fine temple, with four streets around it, having houses for the temple servants.” This then was the origin of Thiruvateeswaranpettai, the colony that surrounds the shrine. Samudra Mudali later purchased lands in the Pudupakkam (now part of Royapettah) area from a Muslim noble and donated them to the temple.

    A long-drawn case in the Madras High Court, concerning the lands belonging to the temple, gives further details. The East India Company confirmed the grants of the Pudupakkam lands in two documents dated November 1, 1734 and August 10, 1787. These were shrotrium endowments, meaning that the precinct was meant to house Brahmins who could recite the Vedas. In the last two centuries, the area has changed character considerably.

    After serving as accountant at the Customs House, Samudra Mudali, whose name appears in Company records variously as Somadru, Sumadru, Sumadrue and Sumdrue, became dubash (translator) to Governor Francis Hastings. The latter is not to be confused with the illustrious Warren Hastings, later first Governor General of India. Francis Hastings had been Deputy Governor in Cuddalore and then became Governor of Madras in 1720. He did not get along with his council members, and one of the chief opponents, Nathaniel Elwick, got him dismissed in 1721. Hastings lingered for three months in Madras, dying in the process and thereby becoming the first Governor of Madras to be buried in St Mary’s Church in the Fort.

    Read more at: http://www.thehindu.com/features/met...cle7796590.ece
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  10. #66
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    ஸ்ரீநடராஜர் தரிசனம்! - திருவல்லிக்கேணி

    ஆயுள் பலம் தரும் அபிஷேக தீர்த்தம்!




    தி
    ருமணத் தடை நீக்கும் சர்வதோஷ நிவர்த்தி தலம்; ஆனித் திருமஞ்சன விழாவை அமர்க்களமாக நடத்தும் ஆலயம்; குறிப்பாக, இந்து- முஸ்லிம் ஒற்றுமைக்கு எடுத்துக்காட்டாகத் திகழும் கோயில் எனப் பல பெருமைகள் உண்டு, சென்னை- திருவல்லிக்கேணியில் அமைந்துள்ள திருவேட்டீஸ்வரர் திருக்கோயிலுக்கு.

    நவாபுகளின் காலத்தில் இந்தக் கோயிலுக்குத் திருப்பணிகள் செய்யப் பட்டுள்ளதாகப் பெருமையுடன் தெரிவிக்கின்றனர், பக்தர்கள். இங்கே காட்சி தரும் மூலவர் திருவேட்டீஸ்வரர் சுயம்புலிங்க மூர்த்தம். மேய்ச்சலுக்கு வந்த பசு, சிவலிங்கத் திருமேனி பூமிக்கடியில் இருப்பதை அறிந்து, பால் சொரிந்து சிவனாரை வழிபட்டதே இந்தத் தலத்திலும் ஸ்தல வரலாறாக அமைந்துள்ளது.
    ஸ்ரீமகாவிஷ்ணுவை திருமணம் செய்துகொள்வதற்காக, ஸ்ரீமகாலட்சுமி கடும் தவம் புரிந்தாள். அப்படி அவள் தவம் செய்தது, இதோ... இந்தக் கோயில் இருக்கும் இடத்தில்தான்! இங்கே, ஸ்ரீமகாலட்சுமிக்கு சந்நிதி அமைந்துள்ளது. இங்கு வந்து ஸ்ரீமகாலட்சுமியை 11 அல்லது 21 வாரங்கள் தொடர்ந்து தரிசித்து வேண்டிக்கொண்டால், சகல தோஷங்களும் நீங்கும்; திருமணத் தடை அகலும்; சகல ஐஸ்வரியங்களுடன் இனிதே வாழலாம்.

    Read more at: https://www.vikatan.com/sakthivikata...ory/33367.html
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  12. #67
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    The oldest book in India and continuing at the same location at Mount Road even today.

    Survivors of Time: Higginbothams


    LONG SHELF LIFE Higginbothams on Anna Salai.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Anusha Parthasarathy flips through the history of Higginbothams, India's oldest-known bookstore which is still in business

    Here, the high white arches and wooden railings hold portraits of two men with beards and enigmatic smiles. Higginbothams, India's oldest-known bookstore, began as a religious bookstore in 1844. Every dog-eared page of its 167-year-old history has had booklovers thronging its aisles and taking back a lingering smell of printed paper.

    Though it was started on a small scale by Abel Joshua Higginbotham, the shop no longer restricts itself to a particular genre, absorbing trends and keeping stocks up-to-date, while allowing the past to linger on in the original Italian marble chequered flooring, ornate stained glass decorations over the entrance door and windows and the white façade that is archaic and regal.

    Nothing has changed at the bookshop, and business is as usual. A wooden door at the back leads to the offices, where K. Srinivasan, who has worked here since 1955, sits at the very end. He is quick to dole out trivia, “This flooring is as old as the bookstore,” he remarks, “and so are the stained glass frames over the windows and door. It's because they are from that time that they've lasted so long.”


    Read more at: http://www.thehindu.com/features/fri...cle2630077.ece
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  14. #68
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    Source: Google Images

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A reader's dream in white

    For years, a trip to Chennai for thousands of people, from across the country and abroad, wasn't complete without a trip to Higginbotham's. Once inside the magnificent white structure on Anna Sala (Mount Road), they would be lost -literally, among the rows and rows of books and rare manuscripts. The store still evokes that awe.

    Started by Englishman Started by Englishman Abel Joshua Higginbotham in 1845, a librarian in the Wesleyan Book Depository in London, the book store was shifted to the present site, between Binny Road junction and Bharat Insurance Building, around 1904. Since then, it has remained, in some ways, the last word for books in English and Tamil in Chennai and even South India.

    The building, which sprawls over 15,000sqft, came up in 1904 when Abel's son C H Higginbotham was managing director.

    The book store has re mained there but branches have been set up at several railway stations in south India and airports.The highlight of the build ing is the very high wooden ceiling and a roof with Mangalore tiles. “Higginbotham's building can be called a mix of Indian and colonial styles. There are several such structures on Mount Road with high ceilings and window panes,“ says Indian National Trust For Art and Cultural Heritage (Intach) Chennai chapter convener S Suresh.

    …………………………….

    …………………………….

    Lending to keep the reading habit alive


    Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/44844482.cms
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