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  1. #171
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    Passing through the gates of history




    The intricately carved pillars at the entrance of the Chepauk Stadium and along its boundary wall were part of the Chepauk palace.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CHENNAI: For nearly a century, fans have walked through these gates to watch cricketing history being created not realising that another chapter of the city's past, dating back 250 years, stood right at the entrance.


    Read more at:
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/a...campaign=cppst
  2. #172
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    Oh dear how can we forget annapoorna cafeteria and bombay halwa house and geetha cafe around round tana? Great!
    You know austin8 and morris minor taxis. The taxi from egmore to casino or new elphinstone theatre was only one rupee and Saturday evenings were unforgettable
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  4. #173
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    Those were my bachelor days with my friends. No TV , so cinemas were only our .... thanks dear you have revived....
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  6. #174
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    And walking was part and parcel of our daily life. We had walked from Egmore pudupet mount road for work and marina on weekends. Now Doctos advise us to walk. What an irony my foot to walk on polluted roads and no platforms. Those days cars were known as pleasures yes it was.....
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  8. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by naithru View Post
    Those were my bachelor days with my friends. No TV , so cinemas were only our .... thanks dear you have revived....
    Quote Originally Posted by naithru View Post
    And walking was part and parcel of our daily life. We had walked from Egmore pudupet mount road for work and marina on weekends. Now Doctos advise us to walk. What an irony my foot to walk on polluted roads and no platforms. Those days cars were known as pleasures yes it was.....
    Quote Originally Posted by naithru View Post
    Oh dear how can we forget annapoorna cafeteria and bombay halwa house and geetha cafe around round tana? Great!
    You know austin8 and morris minor taxis. The taxi from egmore to casino or new elphinstone theatre was only one rupee and Saturday evenings were unforgettable



    naithru Ji,

    You are right when you say that cars are referred to as pleasure on those days. Why?

    Perhaps, due to various reasons. We were only travelling by cycle, horse-drawn vehicle (jutka), light weight wooden rickshaws pulled by men, etc Travel by motor vehicle was considered a pleasure indeed. One thing we need to mention was that roads were nice without more pits and holes. No speed breakers.

    There was no smart phone drawing your attention all the time. When you walk you enjoy your soundings. You won’t get calls while crossing the road and you are not bothered by messages, mails, etc. You are free and enjoying the whole Freedom.

    Life was more peaceful then, and time was spent leisurely. Ho hurry burry. What we spend and how we spent, the money, time, etc were really interesting.

    I was a bachelor on those days when I stayed at OVM Street, Triplicane parallel street to Bells Road. Quite adjacent to MCC.

    There was studebacker commander, Plymouth and other vintage and classic cars.

    Memory is a more powerful thing and going back to the past gives a pleasant feel.

    Those experiences were really cherishing.

    We have pleasure in collecting those old photographs, news paper cuttings from dusty albums.

    How we lived on those days?

    Pycrofts road platforms were considered as treasure with lot of old edition books of all subjects like fiction, GK and other subjects.

    Thanks for kindling my thoughts.



    Remember this...?
    Last edited by swathi25; Today at 07:13 AM.
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  10. #176
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    Statues of Queen Victoria at the gardens of Madras University, Dr Annie Besant at Merina Beach Road, HRH Queen Marry and more installed speaking history of Chennai and their contribution.

    Remains of the day

    By GEETHA PADMANABHAN

    Chennai has no dearth of statues. What if we had a contest to pick some of the most interesting? These five will surely find a place, writes GEETA PADMANABHAN

    HRH Queen Mary

    Jeypore block, Queen Mary’s College

    Exquisitely carved in white marble, this bejewelled statue sits on a dark-stone pedestal, in the place it was installed originally. Queen Mary, consort of King George V (1910-1936), delighted in wearing jewellery, particularly Cullinan diamonds, but sculptor Nagappa has used pearls — 15 strings — to recreate her favourite necklace. The beautifully embroidered lace bodice is what she generally paired with her chiffon skirts. A report in The Hindu (archive # 19290122) dated 2/1/1924 said the bust was a gift from the Raja of Panagal, then Chief Minister of Madras, and was unveiled by Lady Willingdon; her speech is quoted in the news item.
    Grime covers this work today. The back of the bust and the pedestal are defiled with names, probably carved with compasses or dividers. The peeling pillars supporting the canopy and pigeon droppings on the floor complete the portrait of continuous neglect. “After my write-up in Madras Musings, M.V. Appaarao, great-grandnephew of the Raja of Panagal came forward to help with protecting the statue,” said Nithya Balaji, QMC alumnus.

    Prof. Eyre Burton Powell




    Presidency College

    Thorough cleaning by the students has left the imposing statue of the founder-principal at the entrance to the Geology department shining — reflecting the glory of the institution Powell helmed.

    The statue was carved by John Adams-Acton in 1838 in London, and the plaque in front introduces Powell, MA/CSI as the “first principal of the Presidency College and afterwards Director of Public Instruction”. The statue “[was] erected by many Rajahs, Zamindars, former pupils and friends to mark their respect for his character and their grateful appreciation of his services in the cause of higher education for more than 30 years”.

    A wooden railing protects the 200-plus tiles — each of a different pattern — on the ground around the statue. The decorated dome was constructed in 1940 with “subscriptions from past and present students and by a generous donation from the Government of Madras, as a memorial for the first centenary of the foundation of the college”. “Powell’s great grandson got emotional seeing the statue,” recalls former principal Mohamed Ibrahim. “He later sent a cheque for Rs. 49,000 to improve facilities in the college.”

    Read more at: https://www.thehindu.com/features/me...le14406618.ece








    Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...ary-Statue.JPG
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  12. #177
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    The hidden palace

    Chepauk Palace is impossible to be seen in its handsome entirety today, hidden as it is by the buildings that have come up around it.






    CHEPAUK PALACE, that genesis of the Indo-Saracenic School of architecture, is impossible to be seen in its handsome entirety
    today, hidden as it is by the buildings that have come up around it. Even its vast grounds are no longer visible, Chepauk Park is but a sad memory. And this sad stage of affairs is not wholly due to present-day development; it began when the `Government' of the time took over the palace and park 150 years ago.

    When Mohammed Ali Wallajah, friend of the British, died, he was succeeded as the Nawab of Carnatic by his son Umdat-ul-Umrah, no favourite of the Council in Fort. St. George. Accusing him of having conspired with Tippu Sultan during the Fourth Mysore War, Lord Edward Clive sent his soldiers in to occupy the palace in 1801, annexed the Carnatic in consequence of the settlement of the Carnatic debts and reduced the Nawabocracy to a Titular Nawabship. When the last Titular Nawab, Ghulam Ghouse Khan Bahadur, died in 1855, the British decided to make its occupancy of the palace permanent by moving out of it, its chief occupant, thereafter to be known as the Prince of Arcot. After a series of moves, Amir Mahal became the home of the successive Princes of Arcot, who from 1868 began receiving a pension from the Government, various tax exemptions and the maintenance costs of their new home. These obligations are still met by the Government of India, honouring the agreements of the Victoria era, as they do for three other princes as well, those of Tanjore, Calicut and Oudh.

    With Chepauk Palace now vacant, the Madras Government decided to legitimise its occupancy by putting up the property for sale in 1859. When Government was the only party that could meet the minimum asking price, it took over the ownership of Chepauk Palace and its host of outbuildings, Marine Villa by the Cooum and their 117 acres for Rs. 5.8 lakhs. And into the palace it moved several Government offices, beginning the process of decline.


    Read more at: https://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mp...1400350300.htm
    Last edited by swathi25; Today at 08:07 AM.
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  14. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by naithru View Post
    And walking was part and parcel of our daily life. We had walked from Egmore pudupet mount road for work and marina on weekends. Now Doctos advise us to walk. What an irony my foot to walk on polluted roads and no platforms. Those days cars were known as pleasures yes it was.....
    hi

    i used to walk from mylapore to mount rd by walk on friday night movies....week ends we walk from mylapore to triplicane/marina by walk in our

    younger days....now not anymore...
    asato maa sadh gamayaa, tamaso maa jyotir
    gamayaa, mrityor maa amritham gamayaaa..
    om shanti, om shanti, om shanti...upanishad
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