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  1. #1
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    Child marriage down 15% over last decade, with big drop in India


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    The number of women around the world who were married as children has dropped 15% in the last decade, according to new data from UNICEF. The group says if rates hadn't been lowered, 25 million more child marriages would have taken place.


    https://www.axios.com/unicef-child-marriage-has-fallen-15-percent-in-last-decade-1520364439-b8236eb5-49e8-46c4-be71-ae8d3d96f77d.html



  2. #2
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    Again another statistical statement !This time it is from UNICEF. God only knows where do these chaps get the data and how do they arrive at the figures ? If you ask they will give a thesis again.
    The old adage "lies, big lies and statistics" seems to be true.
    Brahmanyan
    Bangalore.
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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brahmanyan View Post
    Again another statistical statement !This time it is from UNICEF. God only knows where do these chaps get the data and how do they arrive at the figures ? If you ask they will give a thesis again.
    The old adage "lies, big lies and statistics" seems to be true.
    Brahmanyan
    Bangalore.
    Well, may be 70 to 80% of surveys falls in this category. But there do exist some real ones as well. Many agencies conduct these surveys via online and other medias. Plenty of people keep responding to it in many ways. Such surveys are conducted as part of our day to day activities and we unwittingly responds to them even though it does not serve any of our purpose. These people then analyze the results and publish various results as their findings. Once I got an email asking me to fill in certain details as part of a survey for promotion of a coffee brand. Apart from how many servings of coffee I take a day, the questioner also included some thing like what are my hobbies, how socialite I am, what do I prefer to do in free time, how many kids i got, etc etc. What I mean to say is with one single survey these people collect so many data and then compile it to use for many purposes. Public domains are a real threat to our privacy!
    नाभुक्तं क्षीयते कर्म कल्प कोटि शतैरपि।
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  6. #4
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    I agree that statistics are misleading at best.
    But they are important if they are impartial and objective.
    The policies are framed on the basis of these data.

    I did some digging on how UNICEF collects data:
    The following article is about child poverty, and is not about "Child Marriage".


    Globally in 2012, about
    40% of all babies born were not registered at birth – meaning they do not officially exist. Every child deserves the right to be counted and data is one of the most powerful tools we have to save children's lives, build their futures and influence social change.Data has made it possible to save and improve the lives of millions of children, by revealing where improvements need to be made. Some 90 million children who would have died before reaching the age of five if child mortality rates had stuck at their 1990 level have, instead, lived. This is because of progress in delivering immunisations, health, and water and sanitation services to some of the most disadvantaged and hardest to reach children – identified through good solid data.
    Unicef's 'The state of the world's children 2014 in numbers' is created on the basis of data as a tool to influence and be used by decision makers, identify gaps and show where we should target our resources and energies. There are some key issues to bear in mind when gathering data.
    Identify the gaps

    In the mid-1990s, Unicef realised there were huge gaps in the availability of data. In an effort to fill these crucial data gaps, we developed the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (Mics) methodology that enabled governments to collect information on children where regular monitoring information systems often fell short.
    Mics is now the largest source of statistical information on children and we have an enormous amount of data at our fingertips. These data have enabled us to look at trends over time, compare countries, and look beyond the national averages to compare differences between the poorest and richest, different regions, as well as differences between boys and girls.
    The surveys have been designed to provide a manageable framework with which to monitor progress towards global targets such as the millennium development goals.
    Embrace technology

    Innovations in technology are presenting fresh ways to gather evidence and we are witnessing an explosion of new methods and data visualisation tools. We need to harness the potential of these new technologies to capture and analyse data and use them to disseminate information more effectively and to trigger action.
    Mobile phone technologies for instance, allow a much quicker response to gathering data on disease outbreaks. In the Philippines in the aftermath of typhoon Haiyan SMS technology was used to determine the children most in need of emergency support.
    Acknowledge the challenges

    Despite advances in technology, we still face many challenges to producing high quality, reliable and comparable data. The sensitive nature of some issues – violence against children, for instance, or such harmful traditional practices as female genital mutilation – complicates data collection. Great care must be taken to ensure the safety of the children who are the subjects of or participants in research.
    Access to some regions, such as those affected by conflict, can also present challenges. If humanitarian organisations are denied access to provide life-saving aid then collecting data and evidence in that region will also be dramatically affected.
    Need for objectivity and sensitivity

    Gathering data on issues as complex as female genital mutilation, for instance, require close understanding, sensitivity and collaboration with communities. We can never make assumptions and the data collection needs to be very carefully managed.
    We must focus on the children who are left behind, those living on the street, trafficked children, children in institutions, children with disabilities both physical and mental, and children who are displaced by natural disasters or civil strife.


    https://www.theguardian.com/global-d...-child-poverty
    Last edited by prasad1; 07-03-2018 at 05:43 PM.
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