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  1. #1
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    British war memorial - Dalit Pride!


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    Babasaheb Ambedkarís visit to the site on January 1, 1927, revitalised the memory of the battle for the Dalit community, making it a rallying point and an assertion of pride.

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nationa...le22352514.ece


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    I am waiting to hear the following story shortly written by some resourceful Tamil pakuththarivu writer:

    The hanging of Veerapandia kattabomman at Kovilpatty was the culmination of brahmin conspiracy ending in a fiasco during the time of Britishers in India. Kattabhommu was under the control of his brahmin advisors. Ettappan, the local chieftain of Ettayapuram was a dalit chieftain. He fought Kattabhommu by joining the Britishers because he wanted to oppose the brahmin domination in the society. So it is necessary that the dalits of Tamilnadu should visit the Kovilpatty memorial of Kattabhommu and celebrate their grand victory every year. On that day there should be stone throwing, Salai mariyal, damaging of all shops on the way etc., on the route to the memorial to make the society realise that Dalits are very active and powerful.

    Long live Ettappan.
    Last edited by Vaagmi; 03-01-2018 at 06:48 PM.
    Giving someone a piece of your soul is better than giving a piece of your heart. Because souls are eternal. --Helen Boswell
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  4. #3
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    Historical reality appears to be different….

    Koregaon Memorial: What Does It Really Signify?

    By Aravindan Neelkandan

    The so-called ‘new’ Dalit narrative celebrating the Koregaon memorial, erected for the soldiers of the 1818 Anglo-Maratha War, is a very old one. It is also not exactly an alternative or subaltern reading of history. It is only a rehashing of the colonial manipulation of Indian identities and memory.

    Let us assume that the Mahar community deliberately sided with the British to defeat the Peshwa regime of the Marathas because of the latter’s casteism. Then all one has to say in historical hindsight is that the Mahars made a blunder in making that decision. However, it was not a decision that had not been taken before in the history of India – communities or chieftains of the country have sided with the British so that they could settle scores with their domestic rivals. Every time an Indic community or chieftain sided with an alien invader, the results have not worked well for them. If we assume that the Mahars intentionally sided with the British, the subsequent history shows that the same fate befell them.



    The most notorious consequence of accepting such a narrative makes the Mahars complicit in the subsequent famines – called by some historians as the ‘Victorian holocaust’. Within 25 years of the British East India Company winning the war in 1818, the famines between 1826 and 1850 killed almost 500,000 people. According to William Digby, by the 1870s, the number of famine deaths had crossed a few million.

    Fortunately, the narrative is more a construct than a historical reality. Almost every community had either supported or opposed the British. However, once the evil of colonialism was felt across the board, all came together to fight against it. Otherwise one cannot explain, for instance, why B R Ambedkar did not accept Christianity arguing that it would strengthen colonial stranglehold on the nation.

    After the 1857 uprising, Anglophile social reform leaders like Jyotirao Phule sought to depict the Mahars as having sided with the British and even congratulated them for helping in crushing the 1857 rebellion. In reality, the British started considering the Mahars as unreliable in guarding their empire. Historian Shraddha Kumbhojkar of Savitribai Phule Pune University points out that the Mahar Regiment soldiers joining the ‘Indian Mutiny’ “added certain reluctance the British had always shown with regard to the enlistment of Mahars” and that “subsequently they were declared to be a non-martial race and their recruitment was stopped in May 1892”.


    Read more at: https://swarajyamag.com/ideas/korega...really-signify
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  6. #4
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    Raising a Mahar battalion is history - no story - Dr Ambedkar letter to TOI touches on this Read it with a hand lenses - appears in very small fonts.

    https://m.timesofindia.com/india/fre...w/62347659.cms

    Dalit have to fight for their rights! Benovalance like calling them Harijan or திருகுலத்தான் has not improved their social status - Only Affirmative actions lifted many educationally and financially!


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    Why play caste politics?
    If Etappan was Dalit who betrayed Kattabomman becos Ethappan didnt like Brahmins...
    Then what was the excuse of a Brahmin to feed info to Muhammad Bin Qasim to invade the port town Debal by giving Muhd Qasim info about the citys defence.


    A traitor is a criminal..crime has no caste.

    Capture of Debal:

    Muhammad-bin-Qasim led his army towards Debal, a famous seaport, where the Arab’s ships were looted by some pirates. The port town Debal was well protected by strong fortifications, and it was not easy on the part of the Qasim’s army to penetrate into it so easily. A nephew of Dahir was the governor of Debal. Though he had an army of very small size with him, he tried to resist Qasim. But it became futile, when a treacherous Brahmin deserted the fortress and gave Qasim all the information’s regarding the secrets of its defence.

    He also came to know from the Brahman that the strength of the Sind army lay in the massive Hindu temple inside the fort of Debal and as long as the red flag fluttered atop the temple, he could not defeat the Hindus. The temple was also garrisoned by 4000 Rajput’s and 3000 Brahmins serving at the temple. However, after a fierce battle Qasim brought down the red flag and the Arabian army resorted to a massacre. Despite a bold fight, the Hindus of Debal were defeated by the Arabs.

    The nephew of Dahir who was the governor fled away. Debal was captured and a huge booty with a large number of women fell into the hands of the Arabs. The people were given the option of accepting Islam or death. Many thousands of Hindus including Brahmans were mercilessly killed on their refusal to embrace Islam. The massacre continued for three days. It was very unfortunate that Dahir who had prior information of the Arabian attack, did not care at all.


    Taken from article Arabian invasion of Sindh.
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  10. #6
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    Changing camps is nothing new.
    In Mahabharat Drona was sucking up to the Kauravas becos he was hell bent on defeating Drupada for insulting him.
    Ekalavya could have wrecked revenge on Drona or even killed him instead of cutting off his thumb when Drona shamelessly asked Guru Dakshina even though Ekalavya was self taught..still Ekalavya never gave in to revengeful thoughts..so its not caste..its about ethics.

    Chanakya..next..he too was all about revenge cos he was insulted by King Dhana Nanda hence nurtured Chandragupta Maurya for revenge on the Nanda Kingdom.

    So nothing new when it comes to revenge games be it Brahmin or Dalit....if oppression is sweet (Dalitam Madhuram)..so is revenge(Pratikaram Madhuram).
    Last edited by renuka; 03-01-2018 at 09:35 PM.
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    As author has put it in black and white....may be partly imaged .................

    Koregaon Bhima: How Today’s Political Mobilisation Needs Reimagined History

    By R. Jagannathan

    The Koregaon Bhima martyrs included not just Mahars, but also Marathas, Rajputs, Muslims and the odd Jew or two.

    So, for today’s Marathas to think they lost to a Dalit army or for Dalits to think that they humbled the Brahminical Peshwas is partly imagined “truth”.

    The caste tensions engineered in Maharashtra over a battle that happened 200 years ago between the British and the Peshwas, resulted in one death, the destruction of properties worth crores, and disruption of ordinary life in Pune and parts of Mumbai. It is a testimony to the fact that history is often needed to aid modern-day political mobilisation.

    Briefly, this is the backdrop: On 1 January 1818, the British East India Company’s forces, which had many native Indians in its ranks, fought the Peshwa army at Koregaon Bhima near Pune. The Peshwas, despite being present in larger numbers, could not defeat the British, and the main phalanx of the Peshwa army went elsewhere to participate in what it felt was the bigger battle, to attack Pune. Most historians think the Koregaon Bhima battle ended inconclusively, though Peshwa power was already in serious decline and only some time away from yielding totally to the East India Company.

    The company’s army comprised many Mahars, the caste that Babasaheb Ambedkar hailed from. A British memorial erected to commemorate the battle was visited by Ambedkar in 1927. When he found the names of various martyred Mahars mentioned in the memorial, it helped him build a narrative where the oppressed castes took on the might of the Brahminical Peshwas. Since then Dalits visit the memorial every year to commemorate the victory of the British Indian army over the oppressive Peshwas, who sometimes had laws that dehumanised the “untouchables”.

    Read more at: https://swarajyamag.com/politics/kor...agined-history
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    Quote Originally Posted by V.Balasubramani View Post
    As author has put it in black and white....may be partly imaged .................
    Please read as 'may be partly imagined.............
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    Quote Originally Posted by V.Balasubramani View Post
    Historical reality appears to be different….

    Koregaon Memorial: What Does It Really Signify?

    By Aravindan Neelkandan

    The so-called ‘new’ Dalit narrative celebrating the Koregaon memorial, erected for the soldiers of the 1818 Anglo-Maratha War, is a very old one. It is also not exactly an alternative or subaltern reading of history. It is only a rehashing of the colonial manipulation of Indian identities and memory.

    Let us assume that the Mahar community deliberately sided with the British to defeat the Peshwa regime of the Marathas because of the latter’s casteism. Then all one has to say in historical hindsight is that the Mahars made a blunder in making that decision. However, it was not a decision that had not been taken before in the history of India – communities or chieftains of the country have sided with the British so that they could settle scores with their domestic rivals. Every time an Indic community or chieftain sided with an alien invader, the results have not worked well for them. If we assume that the Mahars intentionally sided with the British, the subsequent history shows that the same fate befell them.



    The most notorious consequence of accepting such a narrative makes the Mahars complicit in the subsequent famines – called by some historians as the ‘Victorian holocaust’. Within 25 years of the British East India Company winning the war in 1818, the famines between 1826 and 1850 killed almost 500,000 people. According to William Digby, by the 1870s, the number of famine deaths had crossed a few million.

    Fortunately, the narrative is more a construct than a historical reality. Almost every community had either supported or opposed the British. However, once the evil of colonialism was felt across the board, all came together to fight against it. Otherwise one cannot explain, for instance, why B R Ambedkar did not accept Christianity arguing that it would strengthen colonial stranglehold on the nation.

    After the 1857 uprising, Anglophile social reform leaders like Jyotirao Phule sought to depict the Mahars as having sided with the British and even congratulated them for helping in crushing the 1857 rebellion. In reality, the British started considering the Mahars as unreliable in guarding their empire. Historian Shraddha Kumbhojkar of Savitribai Phule Pune University points out that the Mahar Regiment soldiers joining the ‘Indian Mutiny’ “added certain reluctance the British had always shown with regard to the enlistment of Mahars” and that “subsequently they were declared to be a non-martial race and their recruitment was stopped in May 1892”.


    Read more at: https://swarajyamag.com/ideas/korega...really-signify
    hi

    even today...i heard in indian army ...mahar regiments/maratha regiments never the same ...both are marathis....in mahar regiments...

    they have baba ambetkar's followers more...in maratha....they have morechatrapathi shivaji's followers..
    asato maa sadh gamayaa, tamaso maa jyotir
    gamayaa, mrityor maa amritham gamayaaa..
    om shanti, om shanti, om shanti...upanishad
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  18. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbs View Post
    hi

    even today...i heard in indian army ...mahar regiments/maratha regiments never the same ...both are marathis....in mahar regiments...

    they have baba ambetkar's followers more...in maratha....they have morechatrapathi shivaji's followers..

    They stand divided...

    This article throws more light on 'Mahar regiment'....

    Indian Army’s Mahar regiment: Home to two army chiefs and a Param Vir Chakra

    Excerpts...



    Under the British

    Within the British Army, the Mahar regiment had a circuitous journey — first used during the Anglo-Maratha wars, later abandoned by being classified as a ‘non-martial’ class, only to be resurrected as Britain scouted for troops during World War II and sent to join the Burma campaign.

    The regiment served the empire for over a hundred years, including the battle of Koregaon in 1818 when Mahar troops of the British Army prevailed over Peshwa troops. However, after the revolt of 1857, its fortunes declined.
    In 1892, the Mahar regiment was disbanded, leading to protests and a movement to resurrect it at the earliest. A shortage of troops during World War I led to the enlisting of only one battalion of Mahar troops, which was merged with the Punjab regiment and did not see action during the war.

    Dr B.R. Ambedkar, whose father had been a soldier in the British Indian Army, was a strong advocate of raising the Mahar regiment again, an effort that paid off only during World War II, when the British Empire once again stared at a lack of troops to cover all fronts.
    The first battalion of the Mahar regiment was raised in Belgaum, with the Koregaon pillar featuring in its logo. The 1st and 3rd Mahar units served in the North-West Frontier Province during the war, and the 2nd Battalion was pushed into duty for the Burma campaign.
    In 1946, after the unit switched to machine guns, the logo was changed to include two crossed Vickers machine guns over the Koregaon pillar.
    Post-independence

    “During the disturbed conditions in the aftermath of partition, the regiment helped in the safe transfer of lakhs of refugees, in the face of violent armed mobs,” the official history of the Mahar Regiment reads.

    “In 1956, the regiment absorbed three battalions of the Border Scouts, which had been earlier raised for manning the disturbed Punjab border. The class composition of the regiment changed over the years, to accept men from all states and classes while retaining basic Mahar composition in some battalions.”

    Read more at: https://theprint.in/2018/01/03/india...am-vir-chakra/
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