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  1. #31
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    A SEASON OF LEARNING

    Students From Across The World Descend On The City, To Research On Ragas or To Get Them With The Best Of Musicians.

    Chennai: It's about a month since Brent Matusiewicz from Chicago came to Chennai. Matusiewicz loves the nadaswaram, he has visited the city before to learn it and this time around he is on a mission to perfect it. But this means more than a month of waiting, when the number of concerts in the city would taper and he can find a guru to tutor him. Until then, Matusiewicz has decided to attend concerts and soak in the season's musical spirit.

    He's among the many arts students and research scholars from across the world who throng the city during the month of Margazhi every year, to learn or publish papers on various attributes of the festival.

    "I had learned to play the nadaswaram from a teacher in a village in Mannargudi. I would wake up at midnight to practise it, and play at the village Shiva temple whenever they needed me to," says Matusiewicz. He had in fact, also spent time at Narasinganpettai in Kumbakonam, the mecca of nadasvaram makers.


    Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/62329704.cms
  2. #32
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    A jugal of a different kind




    Divya Kasturi is a familiar face on the Chennai dance scene. And Chitravina Ganesh is well-known in the kutcheri circuit, both as a chitravina player and a vocalist (as part of the Carnatica Brothers). Tomorrow, on the first day of Brahma Gana Sabha's dance festival, as part of the Margazhi concerts, Divya Kasturi and Chitravina Ganesh will be coming together to perform a one-of-a-kind Bharatanatyam concert, where the vocals will be replaced by the chitravina.

    Divya, who learns Carnatic music from Ganesh, says that the idea just popped up during one of their discussions. "We were having a conversation on different things, and he just brought up this idea. We tried two-three sessions together and it was a pleasure dancing to the chitravina, as it is close to human voice. Since he is my guru, we found that we had a better connection while performing together. We did a performance in London, in September 2017, at the Indian High Commission, and thoroughly enjoyed it. We thought we should do this in Chennai as well, and what better time than during the Margazhi
    season?" she asks.

    She says that replacing vocals with an instrument has been attempted earlier, but this is probably the first time the chitravina is being used in a dance performance in Chennai.

    She says that replacing vocals with an instrument has been attempted earlier, but this is probably the first time the chitravina is being used in a dance performance in Chennai.

    Ganesh says that the chitravina, a 21-string, slided instrument, produces a sound that is close to human voice, and so, using it for a Bharatanatyam recital works very well. "Divya is a multi-faceted artiste; she is a dancer who also knows vocals. I just trust her completely and give her a lot of responsibilities, and play as I usually do in my concerts. She does abhinayams for ragams, swarams, everything... I even asked her to sing a few lines as she danced so that the audience will be surprised," he says and adds, "During the London performance, we took some compositions from the Pancharatna Kritis, for which, when the swaram comes, she put thalam and for the sahityam part, she danced. And towards the climax of the performance, I did a rhythmic exercise for which she had to respond."


    Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/62306793.cms
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  4. #33
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    Lalgudi Jayaraman a treasure house of music: Padma Shankar




    Born and brought up in Mumbai, even as a little child, Padma Shankar could decode any kind of tune. "My mother, Lakshmi Narayanan, is a vocalist and vainika, and any song she would sing, I could tell its swaras. So, she felt that the violin would be the right instrument for me to take up, as you need to have a keen sense of swaras to play the music. She wanted to be a musician, but couldn't, so she wanted me to live her dream," begins Padma Shankar.

    After learning Carnatic vocal under her mother, she started learning the violin under Ramakrishna Sharma, a disciple of Lalgudi Jayaraman. When she got to meet the great violinist in Mumbai, she told him that she wanted to do advance training under him.

    She states that while Ramakrishna Sharma was a music teacher, Lalgudi Jayaraman was a performer, a musician, a musicologist and a teacher all rolled into one. And that made a huge difference. "When a performer is your teacher, he grooms you for the stage. It's like going to a finishing school," she says and elaborates, "He taught me how much music you should have and how much you should present — the balance between learning and performing, what you can perform on stage, and what your stage demeanour should be. For example, when you are learning the violin, you just play it, and you are mostly looking down. But he taught me how to face the audience as I'm playing because when hundreds of people are looking at me, I cannot establish a connect with them, my audience, if I'm looking down. So, the first grooming lesson was how to sit erect while playing the violin. He made me practice looking at myself in the mirror, saying, 'First, look into your own eyes. If you can't see your own eyes, where can you see the audience'," she recalls.

    Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/62352103.cms
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  6. #34
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    Chronicler of the stage, KEEPER OF TRADITION

    City-Based Sruti magazine celebrates 35 years and 400 Editions

    CHENNAI: After a long stint as a diplomat in the United States, N Pattabhi Raman returned to Madras in the 1980s and was struck by the idea of starting an arts magazine — a dream he found wouldn't fade easily and quickly went on to be shared by Gowri Ramnayaran.



    "At that time, we found that The New Yorker had carried a lengthy profile of a Japanese film star neither of us had heard of. It went on to about 10,000 words and we realised we just couldn't put it down until the very end. And I told him, this is the kind of writing we should do," says Gowri, who was involved during the conception of the magazine.


    And so, the first edition of what went on to become one the country's most referred chronicler of everything in Carnatic music and Bharatanatyam, the Sruti magazine, was published in October 1983. Its main story was a profile of 'Mandolin' Srinivas — then a young prodigy who had successfully introduced a western instrument into Carnatic music; and a longer profile of music icon D K Pattammal that ran into the next issue.

    Thirty-five years later, the magazine's latest copy will be unveiled on January 4 at The Folly, Amethyst, that will also be its celebratory 400th edition. "And it will be a collector's edition," promises the magazine's managing trustee Sukanya Sankar. "The issue will trace various art forms from the 1970s and 80s to now, and taking us through their journey and evolution will be experts in each of these fields like Sunil Kothari, Leela Venkataraman," she adds.

    Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/62357845.cms

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  8. #35
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    Carnatic musicians strike a global chord

    CHENNAI: Two Carnatic artists will now feature in a music CDwhich has brought together musicians from across the world. 'Maitree' (Friendship) will have songs based on Carnatic ragas, Irish music, jazz and music from the Middle East.





    Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/62372709.cms
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  10. #36
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    Chennai Margazhi Season 2017: A look at new dance trends and presentations

    There are artistes who balance tradition and trend through their works. A look at some of the contemporary expressions presented recently





    How long can you keep watching the same trope — pining Nayika constantly waiting for her lord and his love — in this day and age, questions one faction of the audience watching dance performances. Contemporary dance is the route that a few dancers take to camouflage their bad dancing skills and poor technique, says another group. Both these viewpoints have been expressed for some time now and there is some truth in both. But it cannot be generalised. Whichever path is chosen, it is the artiste’s calibre, commitment and conviction to their concepts that determines their reach.

    Interestingly, the two dance conferences that unfolded in Chennai during the Season more or less focused on these two diverse angles of tradition and its relevance today.

    Natyadarshan, the dance conference, hosted by Kartik Fine Arts and curated by Krithika Subramanian with the title, ‘Now or Never ‘sought to focus on the traditional finding a voice in a contemporary milieu, initiating a dialogue among the performers, audience and connoisseurs.

    “In today’s world, art forms need to be competitive without diluting their identity and this is the real challenge I had taken on as convener.

    Besides the lectures and discussions, there were performances that were examples of genres pushing the boundaries set by conservative thinking,” says Krithika.

    Read more at: http://www.thehindu.com/entertainmen...le22367024.ece
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  12. #37
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    When Carnatic meets Celtic

    Twin-musicians Sahana and Shruti’s latest work, ‘The Celnatic Experience’, highlights cross-genre influences in world music


    They were born six minutes apart. But that doesn’t stop Sahana and Shruti from completing each other’s sentences.

    These musician-twins have just released a novel music project, titled The Celnatic Experience, which seeks to celebrate the 225-year legacy of Muthuswami Dikshitar and the East India company. The project, which includes a coffee table book, a children’s book and a CD that are available for purchase online, is an extension of their recent thesis in the Berklee College of Music.
    Competitive start

    “We started learning Carnatic music when we were just six and growing up in Muscat,” recalls Sahana. The thrust came from their father, Kumar, an ardent follower of Carnatic music. Soon, the family moved lock, stock and barrel to Chennai to strengthen their musical base under the tutelage of Bombay Jayashree. “It was initially very difficult to cope here because the scene was quite competitive,” says Shruti.

    The two knew that music was their future. After a bachelor’s degree in Electronic Media from MOP Vaishnav College, they packed their bags to Valencia (Spain), to train in the prestigious Berklee College of Music. That sowed the seeds for their present endeavour. “Even before enrolling there, we were supposed to submit a topic that we’d take up for our final thesis, and we chose ‘Nottuswarams’, something close to our heart.”

    Read more at: http://www.thehindu.com/entertainmen...le22352070.ece
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  14. #38
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    This article is shared for the pleasure of reading ... his words ..his style...really touching...

    தமிழை ஆண்டாள் - கவிஞர் வைரமுத்து

    To Read this article please visit this link: http://www.dinamani.com/editorial-ar...D-2840681.html
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