Bhagavad Gita through a Story
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    Bhagavad Gita through a Story


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    Bhagavad Gita through a Story

    “ There is a story about the building of the great Brihadeeshvara temple thousand years ago by Raja Raja Choza in Thanjavur, probably the most beautiful temple in India The king one day decided to go and inspect the work, so he drove to the temple site, got out of his chariot and walked towards where the temple was being built. He came across a man who was cutting stone and he asked him,
    “What are you doing?”

    The man said, “I am cutting stone”.
    He went a little further, and there was another man who was doing the same thing. He asked,
    “What are you doing?”

    The man answered, “I am earning a living”.
    He went little further and came to a third person who was doing exactly the same thing. He asked,
    “What are you doing?”

    He said, “Sir, I am building a great temple”.
    Now you will see the difference of attitude. They were doing exactly the same thing,they were getting the same wages. But the first man was simply mechanically performing a task. The second one had a slightly broader vision, he had the problem of his family and was earning for them. The third one was earning for his family certainly, but he had the broad vision that he was building a great temple for Lord Shiva.


    This illustrates the theory of correct action. Whatever you may be doing, it does not really matter s long as you are doing it with inner dedication and devotion, and as long as you are using action itself as a powerful means for spiritual development. This is the first major teaching of Gita, the theory of correct action.


    The theory of correct action in the Gita revolves around a single concept: that action should NOT be purely for selfish purposes, although the self is obviously involved. Action must be positive, joyous, affirmative action; it must be an offering to the divine.
    From the book ‘The Gita in World Literature’

    Picture is lifted from another site.

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